Men Can Defeat Depression; Boost Mental Health!

There seems to be a new trend now, whereas everyone seems to be opening up about depression and Mental Health.  I do think it is wonderful and healthy for women and especially for men who are now coming forward in droves to talk about themselves and their depression to their peers,Therapists and Psychologists. This is the healthiest we have seen men open up about Mental Health in a decade, which is fabulous!  Below is a helpful article for men about having to deal with depression!

~Lindsay, Forum Administrator

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Women, Men and the Way We Write About Depression

Happy

Daphne Merkin is the author of the forthcoming book This Close to Happy: A Reckoning with
A woman is standing in her kitchen, making a pot of coffee, spooning out the pungent overpriced ground beans from their snappy little aluminum bag into a paper filter, trying to remember what number tablespoon she was on—four? six? three?—before the dark thoughts began tumbling in, doing their wild and wily gymnastics: You shouldn’t, you should have, why are you, why aren’t you, there’s no hope, it’s too late, it’s always been too late, give up, go back to bed, there’s no hope, the day is half gone, no, the day ahead is too long, there’s so much to do, there’s not enough to do, everything is futile, there is no hope.

‘Tis the Overwhelming Season

 

NewYork-Presbyterian Psychiatrists Offer Advice for Reducing Holiday Stress

 

Newswise — NEW YORK (October 2012) — Crowded shopping centers, visits from long-lost relatives, and the pressure of preparing holiday meals can all summon one universal reaction: stress. The holidays may be the season of love and celebration, but sometimes festivities can become overwhelming.

Dr. Mallay Occhiogrosso, a psychiatrist at the Payne Whitney Clinic at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, says, “Overly high expectations for the holidays — be it around the food, the gifts, or the family relationships — can trigger anxiety and even depression. Prioritizing self-care is important, as well as dialing down those unrealistic ‘Hallmark holiday’ fantasies.”

“During the holidays, our lives become even more stressful as we try to juggle our usual responsibilities with extra holiday preparation and complicated family dynamics,” says Dr. Maria A. Oquendo, a psychiatrist at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center.

Drs. Occhiogrosso and Oquendo suggest that you try to keep your holiday stress to a minimum this year with the following advice:

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How to Age Well

 

The importance of letting regrets go

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

The poem “Maud Muller” by John Greenleaf Whittier aptly ends with the line, “For of all sad words of tongue or pen, The saddest are these: ‘It might have been!’” What if you had gone for the risky investment that you later found out made someone else rich, or if you had had the guts to ask that certain someone to marry you? Certainly, we’ve all had instances in our lives where hindsight makes us regret not sticking our neck out a bit more.

But new research suggests that when we are older these kinds of ‘if only!’ thoughts about the choices we made may not be so good for our mental health. One of the most important determinants of our emotional well being in our golden years might be whether we learn to stop worrying about what might have been.

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The gut-brain connection

Have you ever had a “gut-wrenching” experience? Do certain situations make you “feel nauseous”? Have you ever felt “butterflies” in your stomach? We use these expressions for a reason. The gastrointestinal tract is sensitive to emotion. Anger, anxiety, sadness, elation — all of these feelings (and others) can trigger symptoms in the gut. Continue Reading →