Diet Causes Depression, this diet may help.

MediteranianFood

April 5, 2018 by DEREK Food

– Last week, my Twitter feed was dominated by news about a “new organ” that has recently been discovered. Given how many centuries we’ve been conducting autopsies, this newsflash was rather hard to believe. The interstitium is not new, exactly, but its role has been greatly expanded. Once believed to a dense layer of collagen, it turns out these fluid-filled spaces might aid the spread of cancer tumors to lymph nodes.

 

Continue reading “Diet Causes Depression, this diet may help.”

This Artist Depicted Depression Through Photography & Her Work Will Leave You Speechless

Describing depression isn’t easy. It’s more than sadness. It’s emptiness, hopelessness, a place so deep and dark that trying to explain it to someone who hasn’t experienced it can feel impossible. But one artist described depression through photography, though, and it might give you a glimpse into the mind of people suffering from this oftentimes debilitating illness.

Continue reading “This Artist Depicted Depression Through Photography & Her Work Will Leave You Speechless”

DEPRESSED IN THE CITY: 1 in 5 New Yorkers suffer from mental health disorders

 

 

 

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Thursday, November 12, 2015, 1:55 PM
 

For editorial use only. Additional clearance required for commercial or promotional use, contact your local office for assistance. Any commercial or promotional use of Bloomberg content requires Bloomberg's prior written consent. 

At least 8% of New York City residents suffer from symptoms of depression, a new report by the city Department of Health says.

We're the Big Blue Apple.

One in five New Yorkers have a mental health disorder, and at least 8% suffer from symptoms of depression, a new report by the city Department of Health says.

“Major depressive disorder is the single greatest source of disability in NYC,” the report says. "At any given time over half a million adult New Yorkers are estimated to have depression, yet less than 40% report receiving care for it.”

 

Continue reading “DEPRESSED IN THE CITY: 1 in 5 New Yorkers suffer from mental health disorders”

Pumpkin spice with a side of anxiety? How autumn affects mental health

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"I think it's partly the changing of the seasons, but fall is also filled with so much scheduling and newness," said Borchard, founder of Project Beyond Blue, an online community for people affected anxiety and depression.

Borchard is not the only American stressed out by this season. While some people welcome pumpkin spice lattes, football games and changing leaves with open arms, others dread the annual anxiety-level increase that comes with busier schedules and shorter days.

 

Continue reading “Pumpkin spice with a side of anxiety? How autumn affects mental health”

Depression and teens

Learning that your teen has depression can be terrifying for a parent – concerns range from getting the right treatment to general safety. It was estimated in 2013 that 8 percent of high school students attempted suicide one or more times in the previous 12 months, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

And now, a reanalysis of data in The BMJ last week found that Paxil, one of the most prescribed antidepressants on the market, is ineffective and even harmful for treating major depression in adolescents.

The new findings are in contrast to the original study from 2001. Researchers of the original industry-funded study found Paxil, just one of a group of serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, was safe and effective. The reanalysis showed that a number of adolescents from the original study did experience increased thoughts of suicide. But the suicidal thoughts were simply counted as generic adverse events and not clearly presented in the results.

For a long time, there have been some indications that these medicines may raise the rates of thoughts of self-harm in adolescents. This led the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2007 to issue a “black box” warning about increases in suicidal thoughts. In December 2014, the warning was revised to state that attempts at self-harm decreased in patients ages 24 and older with anti-depressant use, but there was no change on the warning for adolescents.

During this nearly decade long discussion, most psychiatrists and many other mental health professionals felt that the warnings were too strict. As a result, they thought many teens were not getting the help that they needed – while others worried that these medicines were possibly harmful. 

What has followed in the wake of this latest reanalysis are stories in the press which have raised the issue of the safety and effectiveness of some antidepressant medications for adolescents.  

 

Continue reading “Depression and teens”

Eating Healthy Lowers Risk Of Declining Memory,Thinking Skills By 24%

Healthy Diet
A healthy diet leads to a healthy mind.  
 
 

It’s no surprise when someone adopts healthier eating habits when they’re trying to slim down and look their best for summer. However, rarely do we hear about someone eating healthier in an effort to improve their cognitive skills. A recent study published in the American Academy of Neurology’s journal Neurology has found that adhering to a healthy diet can lower a person’s risk for suffering a decline in memory and thinking as they get older.

 

Continue reading “Eating Healthy Lowers Risk Of Declining Memory,Thinking Skills By 24%”

No more excuses: Move it or lose it!

 

 

 

Sore knees keeping you from a brisk walk through Valley Forge? Waiting out an aching back before hitting the Y? Ironically, lack of exercise is likely the reason your body is inflamed. Waiting for it to magically heal itself is not only dangerous but could be making it worse. It’s time to dump the excuses and start cycling, hiking and even singing your way back to a healthier and happier lifestyle. You would be surprised at how quickly and favorably your body will respond to even a moderate, low-impact workout.

Reality check
Did you know that every one pound gained puts approximately three to 10 pounds more pressure on your knees when walking, running or climbing stairs? Wincing through a barre class may seem overwhelming at first, but keeping your weight healthy, your muscles flexible and your bones strong are essential to pain relief. The endorphin high after a romp on the Radnor Trail can help ease depression; a weekly dance class can work wonders, increasing memory skills and warding off dementia.
No one knows the magical healing benefits of exercise better than the staff at Bryn Mawr Rehab. Domenica Hottenstein of Paoli is a rehab nurse for patients with brain or joint injuries. “Daily exercise is paramount in the rehabilitation process. We get each patient on his or her feet every day no matter what current condition. Even if they are unable to move themselves, our specialists will physically move them until they can.” Domenica says she still marvels at how quickly the human body can recover as long as it keeps pushing its limits every day.
This lesson became very real for Domenica, 49, last winter when she slipped on black ice and severely injured her ankle, requiring surgery, bed rest and a long recovery process. An active runner, Mojo friend and busy mother of three teenagers, she was devastated but she didn’t sit still for long. “I knew it would get better if I did the time,” Domenica says, “and if I didn’t try to stay in shape, it would take twice as long for me to recover.” With the assistance of her doctor and physical therapist, Domenica developed a workout regimen with high-intensity upper-body movements and lots of loud music. It worked. Less than a year later, she is as fit, trim and youthful as she was before her injury.

High intensity/Low-impact tips

As they say, if it doesn’t challenge you, it won’t change you. It’s up to you to be creative and persistent in finding enjoyable activities that push you physically. Even moderate exercise can do wonders to ease pain and keep your weight in check. Consult your doctor and/or physical therapist to learn your limitations, but don’t let them become a “reason” to sit on the sidelines.
 

Upper-body cardio

It’s a myth that a good cardiovascular workout needs to be high impact – with feet leaving the ground – in order to get results. Not true! As long as your heart rate has been elevated for a minimum of 20 consecutive minutes, you’re getting a great workout and you can certainly get there with low impact exercises. To add intensity, try accessing the upper body with more power and strength. The more muscle groups used simultaneously, the more calories burned and the bigger the metabolic boost. For instance, if walking is your activity of choice, walk briskly. Consciously engage your core by walking tall with your shoulders down and back. It makes me crazy to see people “power walking” with their arms flaccidly at their sides! Increase intensity by treating your arms like they are weights. Bringing them up higher with more force brings more muscles to life and gives you more bang for your efforts.

Continuous movement

Are you someone who stops moving just when your breath gets a little choppy? If so, you are cheating yourself. Keep moving until you reach a level of fatigue and then reach beyond it – regularly and frequently. If your muscles are sore the next day, congrats! It’s a desirable sign that your body is repairing itself and getting stronger for its next play date. Please note that pain is not good. Lay off that movement until you consult a professional.

 

Continue reading “No more excuses: Move it or lose it!”

Demonize Mental Illness – And What to Do About

Stigma and Mental Illness

Samantha Eyler

 

Originally published on Role Reboot and cross-posted here with their permission.

(Trigger Warning: Ableist slurs.)

Last week, the Washington Post ran a version of my last Role Reboot column on how a nervous breakdown helped me to come to terms with my Facebook addiction.

 

Excited as I was to see one of my own articles in a national paper, I was pained to discover, when I first looked over the post, that several dozen commenters had already weighed in with the consensus that I am a “nut job” who really needs to get out of her parents’ basement.

As a woman whose ex-husband once posted a 5,000-word article detailing why he believed her to suffer from borderline personality disorder, this popular excoriation hardly came as a surprise, though a stinging one nonetheless.

But it still prompted a question faced by many other writers who’ve dared to talk about their mental health in a self-compassionate way: When someone calls you crazy in an attempt to stigmatize and silence you, how can you respond?

 

Continue reading “Demonize Mental Illness – And What to Do About”

The Surprising Link Between Gut Bacteria And Anxiety

The Huffington Post  |  By Carolyn Gregoire

 

Posted: 01/04/2015 10:05 am EST

 

 

GUT BACTERIA

 

 

In recent years, neuroscientists have become increasingly interested in the idea that there may be a powerful link between the human brain and gut bacteria. And while a growing body of research has provided evidence of the brain-gut connection, most of these studies so far have been conducted on animals.

 

Now, promising new research from neurobiologists at Oxford University offers some preliminary evidence of a connection between gut bacteria and mental health in humans. The researchers found that supplements designed to boost healthy bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract ("prebiotics") may have an anti-anxiety effect insofar as they alter the way that people process emotional information.

 

While probiotics consist of strains of good bacteria, prebiotics are carbohydrates that act as nourishment for those bacteria. With increasing evidence that gut bacteria may exert some influence on brain function and mental health, probiotics and prebiotics are being increasingly studied for the potential alleviation of anxiety and depression symptoms.

 

"Prebiotics are dietary fibers (short chains of sugar molecules) that good bacteria break down, and use to multiply," the study's lead author, Oxford psychiatrist and neurobiologist Dr. Philip Burnet, told The Huffington Post. "Prebiotics are 'food' for good bacteria already present in the gut. Taking prebiotics therefore increases the numbers of all species of good bacteria in the gut, which will theoretically have greater beneficial effects than [introducing] a single species."

Continue reading “The Surprising Link Between Gut Bacteria And Anxiety”

Making New Year’s Resolutions Succeed

And enjoy the new year

 

Year after year, we make New Year’s resolutions that over time wither and fade into failed attempts to transform some aspect of our lives. The goals may range from health, exercise, relationships and finances all the way to spiritual and personal growth. The moment that we elect to make a significant change, we may begin to feel a bit of an endorphin rush as we fantasize what it would feel like. Yet, what begins with hopeful optimism gets swallowed into the basin of our life’s disappointments. Once again the high derived from the vision of change surrenders to the dulled resignation of the status quo.

It’s curious as to how we try to evoke change in the same way — year in and year out — with similar results. If we conducted a survey six months after the New Year and asked people about the success of their resolutions, we’d no doubt find an abysmal rate of failure. Our struggle with change is resoundingly stubborn and scant attention is devoted toward understanding why that’s the case. Let’s take a look.

 

Change begins as a thought, underscored by a wish or even stronger, an inspiration. This may set in motion an even stronger feeling, an intention. Most people find themselves somewhere within this continuum. Clearly, where you fall within that range is important toward the eventual outcome but nevertheless insufficient for an assurance of reaching your goal.

 

Continue reading “Making New Year’s Resolutions Succeed”