Overcoming Your Manic, Late Night, Emotional, Compulsive, Eating Habits – Strategically

Manic2

How to bounce back from a slip in discipline.

Daniel Thomas Hind
Contributor.

10:05pm. The doorbell rings.

Reflexively, I rise, nerves dulled. I don’t care to put on a shirt.

My cheeks are burning hot and sweat has gathered cold on my forehead, or it was already there.

I open the door and there stands the same Mexican delivery boy from an hour ago, 20 years old, holding a brown paper bag. I pretend not to acknowledge him.

This is no time to be upset. Chipotle has arrived! Dinner #2 for the night.  I say nothing, my eyeballs puffy and hand the kid a $20 bill.

 

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Protocol to Treat Anorexia Is Faulted

When a malnourished teenager with anorexia nervosa is admitted to the hospital, weight gain is a top priority — and food is medicine. But doctors mete out meals with caution, providing fewer calories than needed at first because the patients may be so frail that major swings in diet can be life-threatening.

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Long-Term Effects of Eating Disorders on Fertility and Pregnancy

Long-Term Effects of Eating Disorders on Fertility and Pregnancy

Fertility was modestly affected by lifetime eating disorders.

Eating disorders commonly disrupt menstrual cycles, but information is sparse about long-term effects of these disorders on fertility and attitudes toward pregnancy. Investigators examined these issues in a cohort of 14,600 women that included 171 with lifetime anorexia nervosa, 199 with lifetime bulimia nervosa, and 82 with lifetime anorexia+bulimia. Continue Reading →

Chronic Eating Disorders

A Different Approach to Treatment Resistance

By Allan S. Kaplan, MD and Kate Strasburg, MD 

Eating disorders in general and anorexia nervosa in particular are complex and difficult psychiatric disorders to treat. Empirical research has established effective treatments of bulimia nervosa. However, anorexia nervosa remains without effective empirically based treatments, especially for adult patients. A significant majority of patients with bulimia nervosa will have a good outcome; however, a small minority, approximately 10%, will be refractory to treatment.

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Teens’ Eating Disorders Signal Other Psych Problems

    By Michael Smith, North American Correspondent, MedPage Today
    March 07, 2011
     
     * According to this study, adolescents have eating disorders at rates only slightly lower than adults — and most teens with the problem have at least one other psychiatric comorbidity, including suicidal thoughts.
     * Note that girls were more likely to report bulimia, binge eating, and sub-threshold anorexia, but there were no sex differences in anorexia or in sub-threshold binge eating.

     Adolescents have eating disorders at rates only slightly lower than adults — and most teens with the problem have at least one other psychiatric comorbidity, including suicidal thoughts, researchers reported. Continue Reading →