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    New AAN Guidelines on Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

        April 11, 2011 (Honolulu, Hawaii) — The American Academy of Neurology has released new guidelines on the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN).   The document provides evidence-based guidance on use of a range of pharmacologic agents, including anticonvulsants, antidepressants, opioids, and others, as well as nonpharmacologic treatments, such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and magnetic field treatment. Dr. Vera Bril “We were pleased to see so many of the pain treatments had high-quality studies that support their use,” said Vera Bril, MD, from the University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, lead author of the guidelines. “Still, it is important that more research be done to show how…

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    Should Psychiatrists Manage Pain?

    Charles E. Argoff, MD Hi. My name is Dr. Charles Argoff, Professor of Neurology at Albany Medical College and Director of the Comprehensive Pain Center at Albany Medical Center in Albany, New York. I’d like to talk today about the role of behavioral care, specifically the role of a psychiatrist, in managing chronic pain. I’ve been doing pain management (I don’t want to date myself) for over 20 years. It was an interest of mine when I was doing my neurology residency and thereafter, I focused my professional activities on this area.

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    Researchers Discover Novel Therapeutic For Chronic Pain

    Researchers Discover Novel Therapeutic For Chronic Pain   Columbia scientists working to combat injury-related depression, substance abuse and suicide due to unremitting, persistent pain may have discovered a new way of treating that pain: a powerful analgesic dubbed N60 that leads to neither tolerance nor addiction. Pain is a perception in the brain triggered by signals sent along nerves in the peripheral nervous system. It is a sensation that serves as a defense mechanism for the organism but how it works is only beginning to be understood. Scientists now know, though, that there are several pathways by which the brain perceives different types of pain.

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    Music on prescription could help treat emotional and physical pain

    New research into how music conveys emotion could benefit the treatment of depression and the management of physical pain. Using an innovative combination of music psychology and leading-edge audio engineering the project is looking in more detail than ever before at how music conveys emotion.  The project, at Glasgow Caledonian University is supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).The research could lead to advances in the use of music to help regulate a person’s mood, and promote the development of music-based therapies to tackle conditions like depressive illnesses. It could help alleviate symptoms for people who are dealing with physical pain and even lead to doctors putting…

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    Hidden Disabilities

    Very often our perception and judgment of a person is based on what is visible or apparent to us – what we can readily notice. But what about the things that are invisible to us? How do we access information, or even remember that there is information about a person that we don’t notice?     I recently met Grace, a woman who had a traumatic brain injury when she was sixteen years old. She was in a car accident, an all too common occurrence. An accident occurs, the head hits a part of the car and internal damage to the brain results, ranging from mild to severe. Grace shows…

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    Depression And Chronic pain Are Common And Often Overlapping Disorders

    ScienceDaily (Nov. 5, 2008) — The brains of individuals with major depressive disorder appear to react more strongly when anticipating pain and also display altered functioning of the neural network that modifies pain sensitivity, according to a new report.   “Chronic pain and depression are common and often overlapping syndromes,” the authors write as background information in the article. Recurring or chronic pain occurs in more than 75 percent of patients with depression, and between 30 percent and 60 percent of patients with chronic pain report symptoms of depression “Understanding the neurobiological basis of this relationship is important because the presence of comorbid pain contributes significantly to poorer outcomes and…