Meds

New study may take guesswork out of prescribing antidepressants

New study may take guesswork out of prescribing antidepressants August 19, 2006–Houston, Texas — Fourteen million Americans suffer from depression and experts say only about 20 percent are being treated properly. Finding the right medication can be a long process of trial and error. However, doctors may soon have a better way to predict how a person will respond to treatment.

For the last four years, Diana Layton has suffered from depression.

“My worst day is just wishing I didn’t exist. You just, you just don’t want to be. You want to be anywhere else, but where you are” said Diana Layton.

Now Layton is ready to take the next step to treat her depression. She’s taking part in a study that’s looking at a novel way to predict early how patients may respond to antidepressants.

“The goal of this study is to be able to tell, to use a very simple diagnostic test of the brain, to be able to tell within a few days if someone is going to be, respond to an antidepressant instead of having to do trial and error and wait for four to six weeks,” said Psychiatrist Dr. Lauren Marengell.

Experts use EEGs to measure Diana’s brain waves. When her antidepressant starts to work, doctors can see what part of her brain responds.

“We think that by using a computational model of the EEG brain activity, we can actually predict that the brain is starting to wake up,” Marengell said.

Layton is taking an FDA approved medication and will be closely monitored for 13 weeks. She’s hopeful that this new, experimental approach will help her bypass the lengthy process of trial and error and help get her life back on track.

Besides the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, other sites participating in this on-going study include Cedar-Sinai Medical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Northwestern University, University of Pittsburgh, University of Texas Southwestern, UCLA, and University of California San Diego.

SOURCE:- August 19, 2006–Houston, Texas — Fourteen million Americans suffer from depression and experts say only about 20 percent are being treated properly. Finding the right medication can be a long process of trial and error. However, doctors may soon have a better way to predict how a person will respond to treatment.

For the last four years, Diana Layton has suffered from depression.

“My worst day is just wishing I didn’t exist. You just, you just don’t want to be. You want to be anywhere else, but where you are” said Diana Layton.

Now Layton is ready to take the next step to treat her depression. She’s taking part in a study that’s looking at a novel way to predict early how patients may respond to antidepressants.

“The goal of this study is to be able to tell, to use a very simple diagnostic test of the brain, to be able to tell within a few days if someone is going to be, respond to an antidepressant instead of having to do trial and error and wait for four to six weeks,” said Psychiatrist Dr. Lauren Marengell.

Experts use EEGs to measure Diana’s brain waves. When her antidepressant starts to work, doctors can see what part of her brain responds.

“We think that by using a computational model of the EEG brain activity, we can actually predict that the brain is starting to wake up,” Marengell said.

Layton is taking an FDA approved medication and will be closely monitored for 13 weeks. She’s hopeful that this new, experimental approach will help her bypass the lengthy process of trial and error and help get her life back on track.

Besides the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, other sites participating in this on-going study include Cedar-Sinai Medical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Northwestern University, University of Pittsburgh, University of Texas Southwestern, UCLA, and University of California San Diego.

SOURCE:- by Jessica Lovell
49ABCNEWS.COM

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