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Admitting Mental Illness


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How many of us are having a difficult time admitting we have a problem?

I try to say no everything is normal...I think its a step in the right direction

to give yourself a break & say maybe things are a little messed up...

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Screenman:

I concur. Sometimes it difficult to come to terms with knowing one has a mental illness or a behavioral challenge. But it is certainly not a weakness to seek assistance or support or healing. Indeed, such a search is a sign of courage and willingness to take the risk to be a more whole human being.

Life is messy. And we all need help in one way or another.

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I'd requote Tim.

There is a release of demands upon ourselves when we finally admit we have a problem and need help. Then after we seek help and find it, it is a release to find out our feelings are normal for people with our problems.

I tried to fake it and deny I had a problem but when I finally did, it helped me so very much. Not only me but my family as well. I went to see a Pdoc and was then gave the option to enter a mental hospital. I chose the mental hospital and have never requetted it. I am a better man for it. It opened my eyes to meet other with the same problems with depression. I thought I was all alone until then.

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How many of us are having a difficult time admitting we have a problem?

I try to say no everything is normal...I think its a step in the right direction

to give yourself a break & say maybe things are a little messed up...

I admitted it when all other methods were exhausted and my breakdowns made me go to the doctor. Glad I'm on medication now and I'm definitely not in denial that I am depressed, have servere anxiety and ocd. I call my head med my nice little yellow 100mg pill. Soon I'll be calling them my nice 150mg pills.

Edited by flasquish
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Thats the first step in recovering. You won't fix something that isn't broken.

Until I admitted I was an alcoholic I couldn't stop drinking.

Until I admitted I wasn't thinking good I started therapy.

Until I admitted I couldn't be honest with myself I started to see a p doc and meds.

I've had to hit bottom with everything so far that I needed to change in my life. And more to come I'm sure.

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There as a period in my life where I was in denial of my issues. I knew I had anxiety, but it was no issue to me. I knew deep down that I was ignoring the fact I was ruining my life, and I knew that ignoring my physical and mental health disorders/syndromes would not benefit me in anyway.

Naturally I am somebody who answers a "how are you?" question with "I'm good, how are you?" even when I'm really low.

It takes quite a lot in yourself to admit that you do have an issue, to know that you're in denial and you do have a serious problem. It took me some time to realize my coping mechanisms and my way of life weren't healthy, and they stunted my ability to grow, change and learn, which is something I strive for.

I think admitting, at least to yourself, that you have an issue and you need to take a break is a very good thing, and I'm glad that you've been able to see this. I wish you the absolute best and I hope things get easier, and talking about what goes on in your head is easier to talk about to other people.

Edited by Lucerne
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