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What's A Good Job For A Depressed Person?


crazydayz

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To anyone reading this,

I am at a really low point again right now, have had depression for years and probably more years to come. I've quit my last 3 jobs and it's getting harder and harder to find work that I can stay in, that will take me and that I can find bearable. I know everybody is different, including different skills and backgrounds, personalities, etc but are there any jobs or employers (in Canada, sorry :) ) that I might be able to do or that you find you can do, despite the major downs depression can have?

Like one of my last jobs was dealing with very difficult clients in bad situations who were either crying or yelling at me at a call centre...and you can maybe imagine how that went...haha...but I was forced to take the job to get by...

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Avoid the corporate world like the plague is my advice. Maybe corporate Canada is a tad more bearable than corporate America? I don't know. A friend of mine works at a hospital cleaning and sterilizing medical instruments and she seems to like it as it involves minimal human contact.

What's your background?

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@InFlames...I think those corporate worlds are quite similar? :) my background is pretty limited as I've been in school for a long time, degrees in HR and business, have had a couple contracts with government in customer service and HR but it's getting harder and harder to deal with people and have any confidence.

@Dolphin2013, I totally hear you...but I give you props for continuing in the job and hope a better opportunity will come...customer service has got to be one of the toughest jobs to do when you're depressed

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I agree. Stay out of the corporate world and maybe something where there is minimal contact if that is something that bothers you. Maybe working with animals - they give unconditional love! Is there anything you can think of where you would feel productive yet not agitated?

I don't enjoy the corporate sector. I've been I it for 30!years. So much red tape, phoniness, a$$ kissing and getting ahead only because of who you know and not because of your accomplishments.

I wish you the best

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@ crazydays,

Sorry to hear that corporate Canada and corporate America are largely the same. You have single-handedly shattered any dreams or illusions I had of moving to Canada (j/k).

Anyway, regardless of your education,'what is it that you like to do? The suggestion of working with animals is a good one actually. Amiable are not stupid and judgmental like people are. If you wanted to stick with working in admin, maybe working in the back office at a vet's practice may work for you.

I wish I had more advice. Unfortunately I am at a crossroads in my life too, won a job that is sucking the life out of me every day, worsening the depression and anxiety I already have. I have considered long haul trucking as a possible (and completely different) career for someone like me to be able to tolerate. I know that's not the answer for everyone though.

The problem with the corporate world is that since the global economy went arse up in 2008, it's become far more cutthroat and uncaring than it was before and is no place for free thinkers who also suffer from depression and anxiety.

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Hey crazydayz,

i'm currently a student so I might not be able to give you the best job advise but I have been looking for the right job/study myself for a long time. I'm currently in my 3th year or my 4th study. I have tried a lot of different things and still haven't found exactly what I want but I have excepted what i'm doing now just to finally finish something.

My advise for a job would be do something you love or enjoy. If that is working in the corporate world and it makes you happy I say do it. I think everyone's depression is individual and everyone handles it in his own way so you need to find a job that fits you best. Of course life isn't easy like this and there isn't a perfect job but I think you should try and find something that comes as close of possible. What do you like to do? What makes you happy?

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I think being a writer would be an excellent job for a depressed person. Many successful writers/novelists/poets suffered from severe depression. The problem is finding time to devote to that pursuit. I mean, you could take some time off to do it, but I'm in a position where I have to keep working and studying at uni. I would love to just become a successful writer though and be able to live by doing that, rather than having a full-time office job that I hate.

Edited by Saliency
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I wish I had a good answer. I've also had to quit two jobs due to depression and am unemployed. My personal experience has been in local government, but although they were similar organisations it was pan luck what my actual managers were like and how understanding they had of depression. In the UK I think the public sector are more likely to follow any discrimination law (if you disclose depression), all my employers did that, but in one case just because it was The Law.

On what type of work I agree if possible something you enjoy if you can. Maybe it is more important to look at the things around the work like whether it could be part time, what your commute is like, whether you could go outside at lunch (to clear your mind maybe) or whether you can work flexible hours so that it is easier to go to a doctor's appointment without as much stress.

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Man, I wish I knew! I need a job badly. Last year I had a fight with my husband about me not working and some things were said (on both sides). Now in this New Year, I would love to find a job that is somewhat flexible and I don't have to deal with extremely stressful people/situations...that is all I need. The pay doesn't even have to be all that good. For me, the environment is what matters more.

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Interesting topic! I'm still at university and frankly, I don't have the strength to think about my studies, much less to think about a job in the future. The future is still a black hole for me, a big question mark.

Someone suggested animals, I like the idea! Animals are supportive and caring, and don't judge.

My studies are focused on Norse Mythology and literature, which I think would lead to a quiet, stress-free kind of job? (if I ever get one, that is)
I'm interested in hearing more from people that have other suggestions as well!

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I know what would work for me, at least, but that kind of thing is unattainable for me, currently.

I'd love a job where I could be left to actually *do* my job, without being constantly micro-managed. That kind of job is hard to come by, especially in this economy, but people have 'em. I actually enjoy the daily structure and routine of working in offices and sharing teamwork, but get extremely aggravated by supervisors or bosses who are constantly coming around to nitpick, pester or anything else just to put their stupid fingers in the pan, when I'm totally fine doing the job without their meddling or "helpful advice". That's where I start to lose it and eventually leave if it gets bad enough. Otherwise, I tend to like the camaraderie of having fellow coworkers around, especially if we're just slogging through it all together, and have separate, unique jobs, but occasionally have to work together to get it done. At least then, you have a sense of importance in being the only one who's doing what you do, rather than another cog among many in the wheel, who has to ass-kiss and put unnecessary energy into trying to be "better" than everyone else doing the same job in your department. I've spent enough time being forced to network to survive to know how much I abhor it, and how much it makes me hate people.

So yeah, I guess that means being a lone gunman on a team.

It pretty much means you'd have to specialize in something a little nichey, that you'd really be needed for (as one of only a few who can do it).

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Thanks for all the great and thoughtful comments :) I've been thinking a career in mental health might be good too...now...how to get it? :)

I really like the writing suggestion too...and I'm unemployed so I have endless amounts of free time...sometimes I just find it hard to get inspired, especially since I've given in to trying more meds, it can really leave the mind feeling blank

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I had a period of unemployment from September 2011-October 2012 and looking back I don't know how I kept my together! I was applying for usually about 20-30 jobs a week in that time and never getting anywhere, felt like I'd never get anywhere anyway. With the exception of about ten weeks split between jobs I've been working pretty much constantly since then. Since then I've done kitchen work, computer monkey work, administration and now I work in a hospital. As nice as it has been to have money coming in again that's nothing compared to the value of the distraction. During my unemployment period I started volunteering at a charity shop just for something to do, to stop me going even more out of my mind. I know it's not particularly helpful but at the time I felt like almost anything would do, so long as it filled the time and served as a distraction. Course there's stuff I wanted to avoid and still will want to avoid if I come out of work again in the future. Alright, people will have different forms and extents of depression but for me, I really wanted to avoid customer service, call centre and sales type stuff. The type of jobs where you could encounter disgruntled customers and have to deal with confrontations. Each to their own though, I think I've been lucky.

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i agree with others on thread. best thing to do is something that you believe is a decent, constructive thing to do or industry to be in, and where you can use your personal skills and abilities to contribute something. it is difficult to find something not completely exhausting though, the people get to me too.

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I have a friend who works in the back room of a clothing store. he basically deals with the delivery and all that. he suffers from depression and anxiety, and does not really like to be around people so it seems to be working for him because he is not around people a lot.

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I live with a person that has her dream job: quiet, highly paid, very little pressure, creative field, great boss, great location.

She's miserable and cannot get herself to do anything, even the simplest tasks. I don't know why they still did not fire her, probably it will happen really soon if she continues like this. The reason i'm telling this is that the job itself might not be the answer or the problem.

Sorry i could not tell anything more positive.

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  • 6 months later...

If you're prepared to start studying to get that perfect job if you don't have the right merits, then maybe a train driver? I don't think they have to interact with people much, like bus drivers. Bus driving, not for introverts or people with social anxiety. Whenever I see a bus driver in an argument with a passanger I get chills in my spine.

Not all people interaction have to be bad, I suppose. In retail and sales I suppose it can be, but I would assume it's less so if you're some kind of doctor like a dentist for example or optician, where people kind of need you to not having to re-inject the anesthesia or poke sharp things in your eyes... 'Oops I missed'.

Maybe pick up bee keeping, which is kind of in line with the animal job suggestions. Now, how do you become a bee keeper...

What other animal jobs are there except for vet (something I could never be)? I know cat shelters are often looking for volunteers, if you're good with dog, work at some dog hotel.

EDIT: I just noticed this is an old post, but I think it's still worth keeping the suggestions coming for anyone who might be interested.

Edited by bellbottoms
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To anyone reading this,

I am at a really low point again right now, have had depression for years and probably more years to come. I've quit my last 3 jobs and it's getting harder and harder to find work that I can stay in, that will take me and that I can find bearable. I know everybody is different, including different skills and backgrounds, personalities, etc but are there any jobs or employers (in Canada, sorry :) ) that I might be able to do or that you find you can do, despite the major downs depression can have?

Like one of my last jobs was dealing with very difficult clients in bad situations who were either crying or yelling at me at a call centre...and you can maybe imagine how that went...haha...but I was forced to take the job to get by...

After years and years of working in the Government cubicle world… I ran screaming out of there (literally, it was a scene) so I would avoid anything with rows and rows of cubicles,,, I finally found a part time job with a private employer where I can either work from home or I have a desk in the back at the company office…. We work to locate suitable employment for people with disabilities … so I am extremely lucky to find this job… maybe try to find some sort of employer like the one I have… work from home type of thing…. with my brain, I wouldn't last a second at a call centre ….If I had to do my degree all over again, I would now study Archeology .. I would love being able to dig in the dirt to look for old bones….

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For me, it isn't so much about the job but how you apply yourself within it.

Having said that..... it is a complicated situation & often things happen that are simply beyond your control.

Even in a really good job, the content of which you enjoy, there may be other influences such as bosses or colleagues who needlessly interfere in the way you manage your workload. Or for no apparent reason, they seem hell-bent on making your life a misery or dragging you down because they have got issues. So rather than deal with those issues, instead they try to drag you down to their level.

As an example, I left what was more or less the job from hell. It was intended as a stop-gap job, in the first week I was bored out of my brains. I have no idea how I stuck it out for over a year but by the end, I was ready to walk out. I don't believe in quitting so it demonstrates how awful it was. I felt so depressed bit managed to hang in there.

The boss sucked the life out of her staff, criticised them unfairly, was generally miserable & was suspicious of anyone appearing happy. I desperately tried not to be unhappy in that job & to get the most out of it but she made it impossible. In the end I was happy to be made redundant. The only good thing to come out of that job was making 3 good friends.

A month later I found the job I am still in now. This job was in a different field entirely. The people were so welcoming. I still found myself looking over my shoulder. It took at least a year to realise I didn't need to. It was such a pleasure to feel relaxed at work. To feel appreciated & be happy in what I was doing. Having Been in jobs where I was glued to a desk, this had some flexibility & I was able to do different stuff about the Office. even tasks like filing, that i know some people hate, seemed refreshing. Thats one of the things I like about it. I am not always sitting there doing the same thing.

If I go to work and apply myself, then the days go quicker & I feel happier. Any time I feel sluggish or dare I say disinterested or even bored, I know the solution is to get stuck in. It works for me. Of course if you like what you are doing, that helps loads!

I could make more effort to get into some aspects of the role but I am content at the level I am at. I have had jobs involving supervising people, had loads more responsibility & the stress that goes with it. But I don't want that anymore. I am happy to work my contracted hours but not go overboard with staying late. I will not let this job impinge on my personal life, I made that clear to my bosses at the outset. I have interests & hobbies that I like having the time to do. My life/work balance is key to everything.

So.... Things were going well. Then a different person joined the company. Hmmn. Their presence has, at times, made my life a misery. She seems determined to drag me down to her level of misery. It's been a real struggle not to be defeated by her.

I am finally beginning to win the battle & recently we did have words as she made one condescending remark too many. I "put her in her place" so to speak & she has backed off.

She is noisy, disruptive, so bothered by what I am up to it's like having a stalker sometimes! Generally she is just downright irritating. She has no idea this is how she comes across. But gradually I have been making remarks designed to gently break it to her that she is a pain in the butt. I don't want to just say it outright to her because we are a small company but I am sick of her trying to walk all over me. I am hoping things can improve enough that I will be much happier at work again.

How apply myself to my work and to the situation with this difficult colleague will continue to have an influence on my enjoyment of the role. Also what happens within the company and how they want me to fulfil my role will also continue to influence my mood at work. This is why I say it's complicated.

Even a "dream job" will have it's moments of irritation. Not that I want to come across as negative, but here & there it might not go swimmingly well, but on the whole you do need to be on a role that is engaging, otherwise you will get bored. So the role and you attitude towards it are definitely two important factors.

For my money, any job you find yourself in can (up to a point) be fulfilling and enjoyable. Some of that is down to how you apply yourself. If you decide it's going to be boring, I guarantee It will be. If you set out to find aspects of the job interesting and enjoyable, similarly I guarantee it will be.

As regards what kind of job you aspire to (particularly one suiting someone with depression), well.... That is like the million dollar question.

It's interesting people mentioned working in mental health, I would like to do that but am not sure I could go through the training required. Also I don't know if the job would end up feeling "too close to home". But I think if it's an area you have an aptitude for or a great interest in, then looking into ways of getting into the field would be an excellent idea.

Also, consider shadowing someone doing a job you like the idea of. I know someone who now works as a qualified medical professional. They went to a seminar about the medical field they are now in. They were able to shadow someone doing the job. They liked it so much they went off and did the training & now are successful in the role.

For anyone who is depressed, what type of role they do can still be the same as they did before depression, the condition doesn't alter the skills you already have, they are still there to be drawn upon. The condition may in fact give you new skills. You learn so much about yourself when depressed. It takes courage to recover from depression & you have to dig deep. Those are attributes that come with experience, you might not even know you possess them until you really need them.

So that's what I suggest. Dig deep, be courageous.

Either......

go back to what you know and ride out the storm. Become good at what you know again. It can be done.

Or......

Perhaps look into an entirely new field. Do you have an interest or hobby you can turn into a profession? Do you have a vocation? Something that's been there all along but you haven't really ever paid enough attention to? Or perhaps through your experiences of late, being depressed or anxious, you realise you have an interest in a field such as mental health. Think about how serious that interest is. Is it enough to spur you on through some training to get a foot hold?

Well, I hope my ramblings are useful. I have enjoyed posting and thank you for reading, :-)

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lately ive come to think theres no escape. in one sense its work, its some absolute chore that has to be done in order to get money to do things that are more desirable. the ideal as the motivational bestsellers are all saying right now is to follow your passion, but that isnt always possible, at least in the immediate present, where we have to wade through floods of crap to get somewhere safer and more bearable. i think the key to surviving in a horrible job is to try to focus on the opportunities for development, such as becoming more patient, or more controlled, or even just getting through it all without self harming. its a means to an end, keep your eye on the horizon, on the bigger picture, not the daily setbacks that seem to make life unbearable.

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