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What Type Of Lifestyle Do You Lead? (Sedentary, Athletic...)


Which lifestyle best suits you?  

24 members have voted

  1. 1. What type of lifestyle do you lead?

    • Sedentary
      11
    • Moderately Active
      3
    • Exercise Regularly
      8
    • other (explain)
      2


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According to many articles, Anxiety and Depression can be linked to poor exercise, and many people see that after a constant work-out routine lasting 1-2 months, they see significant improvement with their symptoms.

So if you suffer from anxiety, what type of lifestyle do you lead?

-- Angoisse

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I used to be fairly active, frequented the gym three or more times a week and in high school took a couple of gym classes simultaneously. I'd like to be even more active than that and I was really active as a kid like most people. I enjoy walking through wooded areas a lot, but for the past 5 years I've lived in an urban center where you have to travel quite a bit to find any area not paved over. I used to live in the suburbs with a nature reserve across the street, that was very enjoyable and I went for a walk whenever I felt bored to any extent.

I cannot emphasize enough how much I dislike living where I am now. The air quality is terrible because it's a large city in the center of a valley surrounded by mountains on all sides.

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I lead a very sedentary lifestyle. I know that isn't good for me physically, and probably mentally as well.

It's just so hard to take that first step to do something about it.

I am very overweight, and even walking for a very short distance leaves me feeling winded, and out of breath.

I also deal with chronic physical pain.

I know I need to do something about my sedentary life, but it's so hard.

I'd rather just sit in front of my computer, or watch TV.

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I was extremely sendentary during my teen years, so at the age of 20 I decided to do ballet in order to get away from that sedentary life style. In reality, it doesn´t do much moodwise, but it did help with my anxiety. I´m not longer as anxious as I used to be. The good thing is that it keeps me going; I rather spend my afternoons doing something useful as ballet instead of sleeping my life away. I´m also going to start running to get more stamina during ballet performances.

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Unfortunately, I have an all or nothing attitude. My tendency is either to work out obsessively or not at all. Neither has helped my depression and anxiety. Perhaps if I found that balance, things will get better?? However, I think my depression/anxiety stems largely from my poor living environment. Exercise has only helped pass the time and controlled my anxiety while I was working out. Once I stopped, reality came flooding back. This was partly what drove my compulsive overexercising.

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I was extremely sendentary during my teen years, so at the age of 20 I decided to do ballet in order to get away from that sedentary life style. In reality, it doesn´t do much moodwise, but it did help with my anxiety. I´m not longer as anxious as I used to be. The good thing is that it keeps me going; I rather spend my afternoons doing something useful as ballet instead of sleeping my life away. I´m also going to start running to get more stamina during ballet performances.

Helium I am impressed, ballet is an awesome form of expression and exercise. Way to go. I'm hooked on yoga. After starting to frequent the gym a few years ago to get back into shape (56 yrs old) I met a male trainer at the gym that also taught yoga. (I'm fortunate that my gym has free yoga classes included with the membership). All it took was to know I wasn't the only guy doing yoga and I have never looked back. I still see a personal trainer as often as I can (2 times a week ideally). I also fit yoga in about 2 to 3 times a week. Some days I do both but that really kicks my butt. I have lost weight, improved my posture and level of fitness and helped some with depression and anxiety but I am still depressed and still on meds. When I see my psychiatrist the first thing he says is (usually) "how is yoga?" It doesn't matter how much I exercise the thought of going off meds makes me a wreck, as I found out just recently.

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Unfortunately, I have an all or nothing attitude. My tendency is either to work out obsessively or not at all. Neither has helped my depression and anxiety. Perhaps if I found that balance, things will get better?? However, I think my depression/anxiety stems largely from my poor living environment. Exercise has only helped pass the time and controlled my anxiety while I was working out. Once I stopped, reality came flooding back. This was partly what drove my compulsive overexercising.

Couldn't have described myself better than this!

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I've never been too crazy about exercise- it mostly just leaves me sore and tired. I did karate for several years, and it was ok because someone was pushing me to keep going. But I never got much out of it either physically or in terms of helping my mood. I tend to plateau- after some initial gains in strength and ability, I hit an absolute limit where I keep feeling the pain but don't see any more gain no matter how much more effort I put in. Fortunately for me my weight is very stable no matter what I eat, and my overall health is pretty good anyway.

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I am quite active when I'm confident enough to leave the house (or the bed). I would freak out if I put on weight, I worry a lot about it, because it would further decrease my low self-esteem. Fortunately, I'm naturally slim, so it is one of my easier issues, but I can't stop worrying about being active enough.

I go horse-riding once a week and play badminton. I doesn't really affect my anxiety or depression though, except for being with my horse while I'm at the stable. I ride my bike to school and everywhere I can reach (if it's not too cold or rainy), mainly because I don't like driving or taking the bus (motion sickness and OCD).

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I was sedentary due to a very busy life with full time work, single parenthood, and, mixed with my mental illnesses, the only thing I could do was go to work, come home and barely look after things for my daughter, and then collapse into bed. However, since being off work with disability, my doctors have prescribed me moderate exercise. I have managed to go swimming and for walks, and this has helped my self esteem and energy levels. I have to say, though, that it is the hardest thing to even make yourself go outside the door, or start moving even inside the house. With depression its kind of par for the course to be sedentary, as that's what the ill brain is making us do: nothing. So, I have managed moderate physical activity, but it isn't always perfect, and I don't always do it. I do what I can, and have learned after 9 months off work that this is okay. All we can do is what we can do. I am proud I even do a little. Weight loss isn't a goal for me. It's just the activity itself that is the goal. One small step at a time, I say.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I run or bike daily. Running especially gives me almost immediate but usually only moderate relief from anxiety and ocd, but it doesn't last. If I could live on a treadmill I may be okay. I'd say that only minor depression and anxiety respond to exercise in the long term.

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what suites me and what type iof a lifestyle I actually lead right now are 2 different things. I would love to have thetime and energy to exercise regularly, but I don't. With my anxiety and depression the last month or so, I haven not been taking care of myself. I really do need to edercise for healkth reasons... I am also busy with an internship and Grad school, which leave me physically and mentally exhausted.

Woould love to do yoga, pilates, weights nad kickbixing; bit it just is nit happening right now

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I work out regularly and intensely. It's the best way I know to work out the anger, anxiety and frustration. I take it all out on the weights. They represent anything and everything that has ever doubted me. The feeling of accomplishing a goal, even if it's only working the elliptical for 30 minutes, can be a powerful tool when combating some anxiety. The best part is when I come home and treat myself to a nice alcohol. I'll tell you what... it feels really good!

It took a good while to get over the anxiety of even being at a gym. I'm very self-conscious so being in the midst of dozens of people - most of whom I imagined as better looking people who were all judging me - was a tough task. But the more I work out, the better I feel about myself physically, the more confident I am in being there, and then the better the workouts become. After many years I'm honestly in excellent shape and my confidence is through the roof most days. I know it sounds vain but my confidence in my appearance has a lot to do with how I was able to overcome many of my issues.

I don't feel good on days when I sit around and do nothing. That sometimes leads to depression. Stay active for your physical and mental health!

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  • 2 weeks later...

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