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Trace

What Helps Your Depression Most? #2

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378 members have voted

  1. 1. What have you found helps your depression most?

    • Talk therapies
    • Medication
    • Support of friends and relatives
    • Self help books
    • Support groups like DF
    • Exercise
    • Improving your diet
    • Homeopathic remedies ( acupuncture, medication)
    • A combination of all the above
    • Other ( Please list )


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So far...my medication, reading, journaling, yoga, my husband and dog. Knowing that I am love unconditionally even if I do need meds for life. I would rather be here and happy than gone or miserable.

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I have a funny relationship with music.

Sometimes it inspires me to be less depressed....while other times it can set off little triggers from the past.

One song that has helped me a lot is 'Change' from the band Blind Melon. It's main message is 'When life is hard - you have to change it."

'Please PM Member for video'

And here's the lyrics. Very inspiring.

I don't feel the suns comin' out today

its staying in, its gonna find another way.

As I sit here in this misery, I don't

think I'll ever see the sun from here.

And oh as I fade away,

they'll all look at me and say, and they'll say,

Hey look at him! I'll never live that way.

But that's okay

they're just afraid to change.

When you feel your life ain't worth living

you've got to stand up and

take a look around you then a look way up to the sky.

And when your deepest thoughts are broken,

keep on dreaming boy, cause when you stop dreamin' it's time to die.

And as we all play parts of tomorrow,

some ways will work and other ways we'll play.

But I know we all can't stay here forever,

so I want to write my words on the face of today.

and then they'll paint it

And oh as I fade away,

they'll all look at me and they'll say,

Hey look at him and where he is these days.

When life is hard, you have to change.

Edited by Trace
Video removed as per TOS

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Spending time outside in the yard pretending I can keep my flowers alive. . .

LOL

me too! when i buy a plant, i apologize to it

cuz i know i can't keep it alive, but i LOVE tending plants despite my non-green thumb

.... especially gently removing brown leaves from ferns, its sooooo theraputic

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Telling myself, "Be patient with yourself," or "Be kind to yourself." I tend to get impatient for results when I am doing things to help my depression, and I sometimes get down on myself for how I am feeling or thinking, and I don't want to treat myself kindly.

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One thing that has helped me was just talking with someone who I didn't know. I use a Chat called Omegle. It just helps with venting.

I also write, paint, meditate, and garden when i can to get my mind off of things.

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Friends, family and prayer.

Mostly my brother. He knows how to make me laugh :)

Music depresses me! All my music is just so lovey-dovey it reminds me of my recent breakup! I need some angry music, that might help:)

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My medication -- obviously, no serious, without it I am all messed up inside and I am eternally grateful for my psychiatrist finding the right combination for me!

When I feel down at work, a walk outside in the beautiful sunshine.

Exercise, not at a gym though, I hate gyms. I prefer doing physical work around my house such as mowing the lawn, chopping down big trees etc.

Swimming deep in the warm Indian ocean and bodysurfing on a hot summers day, this is extremely exhilirating...(And it is free!)

Writing in my electronic journal where I love to hammer out my depression into words.

Participating on a forum such as this. It seems strange, but reading and posting on these forums just seems to help my depression, I am trying to pinpoint the exact reason...I guess "Sharing is caring..."

Sex (Am I allowed to say that?)

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For me, the very first thing is having a good and insightful psychologist, to whom I can talk honestly about my issues, without having to be afraid of being judged or scolded. She's also able to present me some new points of view I've never even tought about on a conscious level, but they make lots of sense when I start to think about them. Therefore it's quite crucial for my well-being and personal improvement.

Another essential factor is people I can share thoughts with, either friends or peers. I am very happy I finally found my way here, as peer support is really invaluable. Most people don't understand the nature of depression unless they've experienced it themselves, and that's why they aren't always able to relate our problems, or even able to sympathize us. In addition, I find it kind of relieving that I can express myself here in my second language. Sometimes expressing your most delicate thoughts can feel a bit too intense and even intimidating in your native language, so by using a second language you're able to take a healthy distance to your ongoing issues, and therefore talking about them is so much easier.

As I'm single and often go for weeks without physical contact with other people, I find that doing something that makes me feel good physically is important. I lie on my Shakti Mat several times a day and self-pleasuring is important too. The latter is also great cardiovascular exercise, though in general I perhaps should do more physical exercise than I'm currently doing. Good personal hygiene helps me feel healthier, and brushing my teeth, taking a shower and changing clothes do almost miracles.

I try to eat healthily but as I don't always, taking different kinds of supplements is important. Currently I'm taking Vitamin B complex and fish oil capsules, and I aim to take a dose of both every day. I also try to eat foods with lots of vitamins B and D. Milk is my absolute 'mood food'! Besides, I avoid drinking too much coffee and am seriously cutting back my alcohol consumption. Tea makes me feel more balanced and in case I fancy something fizzy, Pepsi Max is a better alternative for booze.

If I'm functional enough, I like to help my friends, lend an ear to them if they're having rough times and in some cases give them advice and seek solutions with them if they wish. Helping others makes me feel I exist for a reason, and it helps me to concentrate on others instead of getting stuck on the Me, Myself and I gear. I think that it is very healthy and helps me to put things into perspective.

And of course there are the little joys in life: engaging in humor, good music, books and movies, cuddling cats and other pets every time I have a chance, eating out in my favorite restaurant every time I can afford it, watching handsome policemen patrolling in the streets, not having to wake up at 6 a.m. etc. Sometimes it's so easy to forget them, especially when going thru a draining episode in life, but I try to notice and enjoy them to the fullest.

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NorthernStar, I enjoyed reading your post and may I say, for a second language you write near perfect English.

Thank you Darrith! It's nice to know my posts are good read despite the fact I'm a non-native English speaker. Of course I have this secret weapon of mine, a Finnish-English-Finnish dictionary thick as a brick I resort to when things get tricky. That's a good way to extend my vocabulary as well.

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these helped me get over my chronic mild depression:

CBT with regular journaling

hormone patch

diet of salmon, fruits and vegetables (decrease caffeine and eliminated processed foods)

exercise and deep breathing

last but not the least, lots of hugs and TLC from hubby and kids

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Seeing as I'm not on medication and I don't talk out my problems, I mainly feel like escapism works best for me.

Because it's not always good to run away from your problems, I tend to try to think out some of the issues via writing them down. Then music, books, TV and film tend to help me escape a bit. Of course, too much escapism can cause a sense of not properly dealing with the problems but for short term issues, this works great for me.

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I think escapism is used by everyone in some sense. How can we possibly resolve all of our problems anyway? I agree that too much of anythng can be problematic, but as long as it's safe for you and others, I see no harm in mindless diversion that keeps despression away.

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Two things: Medication and support from friends and family.

Medication has done a lot for me. I feel better, happier and healthier. I feel almost like before I was depressed again. It's great really, I never thought it would work so well for me.

And then my friends and family who mean the world to me. They're support is awesome. I am very blessed with that, I wish everyone had that.

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Medications are extremely helpful. It helps break apart my depression into manageable pieces that they do not become overwhelming at an instant. Living with a family helps in reducing the cost of living. I have a nice comfy home to live in. Reading books, going to school, and other important activities are important to me as well. Not becoming overwhelmed and being caught with depressing thoughts helps by concentrating in an acitivity instead of dwelling on past events, problems, or recurring themes.

These are just to name a few of things that has helped with my depression.

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It helps me to realize that a person is not put on this earth to populate other people's fantasies. Parents often have a "fantasy" of what an ideal child should be. Sometimes they love the fantasy more than the real child. The same goes for relatives, teachers, friends, lovers, employers and employees, spouses and children. We have a tendecy to "punish" those who fall short of our fantasies and we have a tendency to punish ourselves when we fall short of fantasies. Fantasies like this are often propped up through fiction, music, Hollywood and television: the perfectly "brave" man, the perfectly "feminine" woman . . . the perfectly "cool" person . . . superheroes.

A fantasy is a product of the imagination. It always involves unrealistic elements. There can be no disillusionment without there first being illusionment: you must live up to my "fantasy" or suffer the consequences. Sadly, a lot of the blaming and shaming and finger pointing going on in the world is based on sheer fantasy. 99.9% of criticism and self-criticism is based on oversimplification. We give ourselves and others a grade on the total self: their self and ourself. But there is no rational and sane way to grade a total self. A human being is made up of trillions of things and events and cannot be summed up in a word like: bad, ugly, lazy, dishonest, rude, selfish and so on. That is drawing a conclusion from a small aspect of a person taken out of the context of their whole life. To oversimplify in this way is not only irrational, it is "un-sane". It is to simplify to the point of causing misrepresentation, i.e., untruth. So I guess what I am saying is that we psychologically beat ourselves up and beat up others over untruths and fantasies.

Edited by Epictetus

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