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The Different Types Of Bpd! (Why So Rarely Talked Of?)


  

113 members have voted

  1. 1. What type of Borderline Personality Disorder Do You Have?

    • Low Functioning Borderline
      24
    • High Functioning Borderline
      37
    • Extroverted Borderline
      7
    • Introverted Borderline
      49
    • Transparent Borderline
      25
    • Other (please explain...if you want to, of course).
      16
  2. 2. Which effects of BPD do you suffer from?

    • Frantic efforts to avoid abandonment (real or imaged)
      81
    • Unstable relationships alternating between idealization and devaluation
      78
    • Impulsivity in two of the following: spending, sex, substance abuse, reckless driving, binge eating
      79
    • Recurrent suicidal behavior, gestures, or threats, or self-mutiilation
      73
    • Instability due to reactivity of mood (intense and episodic)
      90
    • Identity disturbance/Unstable image of self
      87
    • Chronic feelings of emptiness
      95
    • Inappropriate, intense anger/difficulty controlling anger
      67
    • Transient stress-related paranoid ideation or severe dissociative symptoms
      59
    • Other (please explain...if you want to, of course).
      6
  3. 3. Which comorbid illness do you suffer from?

    • Major Depressive Disorder
      72
    • Bipolar Disorder
      25
    • Anxiety or Panic disorders
      70
    • Schizophrenia
      5
    • Eating disorders
      23
    • Sleep disorders
      39
    • Dissociative Identity Disorder
      3
    • Dysthymia
      26
    • Another Personality Disorder
      10
    • Other (please explain...if you want to, of course).
      16
    • None!
      4


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"been abandoned by all of my friends but two during this latest crash"

I fear rejection and abandonment, so to avoid it I don't form relationships in the first place! (go figure?) If I don't let them in then they can't hurt me by leaving...

I relate to that fear and I act the same way. My shrink and I spent a couple of sessions discussing that issue, but at the moment I thought it was useless. According to him, it is a mental distortion, and used the example of a cut in the finger asking if I would cut the whole finger. Obviously no, but relationships are a different story. I feel I

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  • 2 weeks later...

I haven't been diagnosed as borderline, so I didn't answer the survey. I've been told that I have borderline tendencies, though. If I were to guess which type I was, I'd say transparent borderline. That sounds very much like me and could explain why most professionals haven't spotted my borderline tendencies. I tend to wear a mask and be pretty different in public than in private. I'm a *very* introverted person, and my social anxiety probably has a good bit to do with that. Also, the therapist considers me high-functioning and has even said that my amount of personal interaction is impressive given how much social anxiety I feel. Perhaps that has to do with personality more than anything, because, despite all my fears and desires to flee from certain situations, I have an independent streak that conflicts with my tendency to retreat.

Also, I've described myself as having a Jekyll and Hyde personality (only people I've been close to--family and a couple of friends--have seen this) before I knew about the types of borderline out there . . . so that sticks out, too. It's part of my fear of abandonment, in fact. Once I get too close to someone, the Jekyll inevitably comes out, and afterward the friend doesn't want to associate with me anymore. So fear of abandonment makes sense to me, too . . . because the Jekyll scares people off. I can understand that, but I still feel that I need to protect myself for the moment when that happens.

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  • 1 month later...

*shrugs* I'm all of them.

High functioning- when I'm well i'm well, and function well. can hold down a job, relationship, whatever.

high functioning for any period of time turns into the other three. I burn out at work (record is 5 weeks until total crash), I sabotage relationships, I Self harm.

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Chasing Sanity bpd is a difficult diagnosis and it takes a long time to deal with the symptoms. Are you receiving any threstment to help you?

Yeah I am. Finally on the right cocktail of meds to control most of the mood swings, rages and so on. It took 10 years to diagnose me BPD, but I've never looked back since.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I am diagnosed officially as Bipolar II with mixed states and rapid cycling. Right now, I am spiraling quickly into a mixed state - if I get into a mixed state, it's almost always around this time of day (7 p.m.).

If I had to pick a personality type, I'd say I'm "transparent borderline." At work and out in the world, people might know I have some personal issues, but for the most part I seem high-functioning and productive. At home, my fianc

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  • 1 month later...

I don't know. I'm confused as to why I would have this illness (despite matching almost every section of the criteria). I don't have the meaty back-story. All thats happened to me - parents never wanted me, (boo-hoo), kind of got stalked for a while. (shame) The whole shid-ing.

Bad swings, perhaps. Do I have bad swings? Do I have anything? Is life pointless? Yes it is. Well...at least I know something. Emptiness and all that. Annoying when you are empty. You start looking online for disorders featuring emptiness and start believing that you're some psychopathic narcissist.. And also, I already possess a rather psychopathic face. It's always better to be like a cliched television character with a hard shell but a soft, fluffy inside. Like that hilarious montage in the Arnold Schwarzenegger film 'Commando' when he's wearing a pink shirt and feeding deer. Brilliant.

So yea. Or no. Perhaps.

Edited by lindahurt
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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

I was at one point an extroverted low-functioning BPD, however, the behaviour I displayed got me tore down by my mother who threatened to disown me and used every trick in the book to make me change. In order to comply, I gradually over time became what I am now; a "quiet", moderately functioning (I find work and Uni hard to cope with at times) borderline, leading my family to think it had all just been the typical teenage rebellion. It was only after a suicide attempt that my family realised I was not being an "acting out teenager", but that I was really ill.

So, if you're a family member of anyone you suspect to be Borderline, keep an eye on them if they suddenly stop "acting out", this can be more dangerous than it is healthy.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I was at one point an extroverted low-functioning BPD, however, the behaviour I displayed got me tore down by my mother who threatened to disown me and used every trick in the book to make me change. In order to comply, I gradually over time became what I am now; a "quiet", moderately functioning (I find work and Uni hard to cope with at times) borderline, leading my family to think it had all just been the typical teenage rebellion. It was only after a suicide attempt that my family realised I was not being an "acting out teenager", but that I was really ill.

So, if you're a family member of anyone you suspect to be Borderline, keep an eye on them if they suddenly stop "acting out", this can be more dangerous than it is healthy.

Hi hellosweetie, I feel like I can very much relate to your post there. However, I have not attempted suicide- I have started self harming though as a form of relief and have frequent suicidal thoughts. I do think its more damaging to keep it all in but when I let it out, I feel like I become a big burden to my parents. But if you ask me, I personally would rather damage myself than to cause pain to my parents. :verysad3:

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  • 2 months later...

Hi guys. I was diagnosed with Borderline personality disorder too- new term emotional dysregulation disorder, I know this can be daunting but try not to get to caught up in the labels they are all pretty much the same its just how we manage it that varies but with treatment and persistence things i believe will start to get easier and there is always hope of recovery or just being able to accept it and live as comfortable a life as is possible. Please do not isolate yourself as you are only reverting back into old habits that wiil not help you. Has anyone heard of The Endeavour Programme for Dialaectical Behaviour Therapy? A therapy to help with your symptoms, like cognitive behaviour therapy. This along with medication may help with your symptoms but also i am a firm believer in getting as much of a balance as you can in your life for e.g friends, support networks, healthy diet, exercise, some mindfulness, hobbies and interests some work if you are able and hopefully things will start to seem more manageable and less overwhelming. I forget to concentrate on what i have as opposed to what i don't have sometimes which isn't helpful. Its hard i know feeling sad, scared are you normal, but what is normal? detached, zoning out, annoyed at the world etc but when i talk to friends i discover i am not so different as they can relate to some degree to what i am saying i think some of us just forget to put things in perspective, but say your affirmations daily and believe you are a worthwhile person just like everyone put on this earth for a reason to help others. Remember not everyone will be forthcoming about how they feel in life themselves and could be struggling and uasually are just as much as you or I. Life can be hard in general i know for everybody that is but if you can concentrate more on the good things in life and try to enjoy what time you have left your approach may start to change and become more positive i hope. Foprget about all these mad rules and pressures everybody else tries to follow, make your own set of healthy correct rules that yiou know are true and work for you and best of luck to all. I am glad i came upon this forum as it helps me relate and not feel so alone in this "big" complicated world. I am not a small fish in a big pond, i am a big fish in a very small pond.

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  • 1 month later...

i'm introverted i'm suprise its the most common i always thought thats its the rarest type finally worked up enought self confindence and got rid of some anxiety to go into a relationship with a girl i been intrested with for 2 yrs been to shy and scared

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  • 5 months later...

I don't know. I'm confused as to why I would have this illness (despite matching almost every section of the criteria). I don't have the meaty back-story. All thats happened to me - parents never wanted me, (boo-hoo), kind of got stalked for a while. (shame) The whole shid-ing.

Bad swings, perhaps. Do I have bad swings? Do I have anything? Is life pointless? Yes it is. Well...at least I know something. Emptiness and all that. Annoying when you are empty. You start looking online for disorders featuring emptiness and start believing that you're some psychopathic narcissist.. And also, I already possess a rather psychopathic face. It's always better to be like a cliched television character with a hard shell but a soft, fluffy inside. Like that hilarious montage in the Arnold Schwarzenegger film 'Commando' when he's wearing a pink shirt and feeding deer. Brilliant.

So yea. Or no. Perhaps.

I can relate to this. (Whoever "i' is...) I do know that my cats are beautiful... and that I reached my limit of 'liking' the posts in this forum in record time.

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  • 2 months later...

*********POSSIBLE TRIGGER*********

When I was diagnosed borderline, I was extremely upset. I had heard that therapists hated to treat borderline patients and basically considered them untreatable. There was a common belief that borderline was incurable. My therapist, who believed in full disclosure, said I had been diagnosed borderline, in addition to my major depressive disorder, because I self-injured, I had a sense of emptiness inside, my moods changed quickly and I was very much reactive to other people and their attitude toward me, and my intense emotions which seemed to rule my life. Let me say that I have not self-injured in a very long while.

I discovered a treatment called Dialectical Behavior Therapy. There are no practicing therapists within driving distance to me, but I ended up buying a handbook for DBT that includes worksheets and self-assessment forms. I bought it at a local bookstore (amazing). Marsha Linehan is the creator of this form of treatment for BPD. It has been of great worth to me. Especially distress tolerance.

Distress tolerance is a wonderful practice for those of us with intense emotion swings, and those who SI.

I have also now had two good therapists (one retired) who were happy to work with me, BPD or no, so my fears were only partially justified. Making an effort to find therapy and help for myself has paid off wonderfully.

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  • 2 months later...
  • 4 weeks later...

I didn't know there were different types of bpd.

At first I thought I was just severely depressed but then to be extremely over reactive, quick to go off, suspicious of people, hate feeling abandoned (like a friend of mine just moving a couple streets over!) and my black and white thinking...I'm definitely bpd.

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  • 11 months later...

Hey all,

I have been been struggling to understand my diagnoses, and have been thinking that I am sure other are in the same frustrating predicament. I have been diagnoses with Treatment Resistant Major Depressive disorder (with agoraphobic tendencies), General Anxiety Disorder (with serious panic attacks), Borderline Personality Disorder, and severe Insomnia. I have suffered with all except for BPD, which I was just diagnosed with in November, for the vast majority of my life—I am 27 and was officially deemed to have these illnesses at age 14, though they manifested much earlier. Like many who suffer, I tried to keep them hidden for myriad reasons, but my first serious major depressive crisis in my teens, coupled with a propensity to self-harm, was ultimately impossible to mask. Since then, I have tried more anti-depressants and augmentation attempts with mood stabilizers and anti-psychotics than I care to think about, mostly to no avail. It wasn't until I hit the good old MAOI class that I found some incredible relief from my symptoms; the first AD to ever work for me was Emsam at the highest dose (12mg/24hr). After it pooped out on me and all serious tries to safe it failed, I went into a depressive and acutely suicidal state that dragged on for months, seemingly without end, and I was finally hospitalized this November through the first week of December. It was beyond frightening, and I am still struggling to find solid ground, as I am now combating constant feelings of a hollow emptiness I cannot briefly explain, and therefore choose to write about as fiction and non-fiction essay (my greatest loves). I cannot shake this feeling. It is with me day in and day out. I spend my hours in marked isolation, as I was fired from my job while on medical leave, and live in a city where I do not know anyone. I know I should volunteer while on the job hunt, but it is just so hard; my agoraphobia and misery makes me just feel all is so for naught. I am currently on my second week of Parnate, and am hoping once it levels out in two more weeks, I will have a bit more strength; it does seem to be showing promising signs. And I have faith but just enough; a frayed thread, really. And I am afraid and very, very depressed...but appear to others, I've been told, "extremely calm." And I do feel calm—but I think it's far, far from positive. It's being resigned to this. And I know where that can lead me. And I will not go there. Again and again. I can't...

I am most confused about my BPD diagnosis. While many of the qualities apply (enough for a diagnosis), some are so polar opposite I find it shocking they are even lumped together in the first place. Most would call me a very gentle, sympathetic, and probably overly sensitive person; I am simply not prone to bouts of anger at all—it usually turns inward toward self-flaggulation and toxic self-shaming/blaming. I used to be quite hot-headed as a teenager, but...I'd be hard-pressed to find a calm and cool teen! However, I do have serious fears of abandonment (but again, have been abandoned by all of my friends but two during this latest crash, as it was "a lot" for them"; and thus, I don't see why making efforts to avoid real abandonment is even a problem...I suppose when it becomes "overly willful" to use a DBT term); have had three awful relationships, but they did not jump from "good" to "bad," but were choices of incompatible partners (all also with behavioral health issues and one with a drug addiction); recurrent suicidal behaviors (constant ideation and one attempt); historic self-injury (which I beat for eight years, and recently returned to—though I am proud to say I've been clean for a month!); instability due to reactivity of mood (intense and episodic); and extraordinarily intense and chronic feelings of emptiness and a sort of hollow depression. I do not feel I have an unstable self-image, but one that makes me so f**king hard on myself, with such high and demanding expectation, I am left feeling a failure or even a fraud at my low points. I am sure that factors in somewhere here.

After doing an obsessive quantity of research (I'm of the academic ilk—ugh—and thus cannot help it), I found that there are general five classifications of BPD—something that would be highly useful, I think, to discuss much more openly and often. It seems so oft omitted completely! Is that the experience of others? (I am listing them below for clarification; it seems to vital to learn this, and yet, it is never centered in conversation and feels of the utmost import.) I definitely fit into the Introverted Borderline category and could not argue against it, though I don't think of this as a condition, like others, that is static at all, and plan to discuss this with my therapist next visit. I want to understand this thing. I want to know it; all of it. Through DBT and self-help, I'm getting closer. And yet, I still feel so very far away from beating this depression down.

So, that's my story and I hope I won't be sticking to it. I hope any of the below information is useful—and would LOVE to spark a conversation with my fellow suffers so we can suss this stuff out. We're a community, you know? What do you think of this?

I feel so in this together. With you—with all of us.

Yours truly,

Liliah

Low Functioning Borderline—The “Low Functioning” borderline is what most people think of when they are first introduced to the condition. Low functioning BPDs are a living train wreck. They have intense difficulties taking care of their basic needs, are constantly experiencing mood swings. They also have an extremely hard time managing any sort of relationship with another human being. Low Functioning BPDs are often hospitalized more than other BPD types, for the very reason that they can’t live productively without constant coaching and supervision. These patients are challenging for all but the most experienced psychiatrists. Unless otherwise treated, low functioning borderlines lead self destructive lives and attempt to manipulate those around them with desperate acts, including self harm (cutting, etc.).

High Functioning Borderline—The High Functioning Borderline Personality shares many core aspects of the low functioning borderline personality, except for the fact that they can manage their lives, appear to be productive, and generally keep their relationships civil (even diplomatic in nature). High Functioning borderlines can appear to be normal, driven people one moment; then moody, inconsolable, and manipulative the next. Somehow, there is a mechanism within the minds of High Functioning Borderlines that allows them to lead somewhat “competent” lives, despite the fact that they are in a constant battle with BPD. High functioning BPDs are no better than low functioning: it’s basically the same face wearing a different mask.

Extroverted Borderline—Anyone familiar with the Meyer-Briggs personality tests will understand the psychological differences between extroversion and introversion. When these characteristics are mixed with BPD, there are two different results. The Extroverted Borderline pushes all their feelings, fears, manipulation, rage, and moodiness outward to the people around them. In essence, if you are around an extroverted BPD, you feel like you’re living through their emotions while coping with your own at the same time. Further, extroverted BPDs will attempt self abusive acts in plain view of others in order to avoid abandonment or to express their rage. For example, an Extroverted BPD might cut themselves and then immediately share it with family and friends around them, hoping to gain sympathy or attention. In most cases, these types of behaviors frighten non-Borderlines, and they wonder whether or not the Extroverted BPD should be committed to a psych ward.

Introverted Borderline—Contrary to popular belief, “introverted” doesn’t necessarily describe someone who is a recluse (agoraphobic). Instead, introversion is characterized by experiencing life in a self-reflective, private, and at times distant manner. To others, introverts may appear shy or lacking in people skills. This might be true, however, introverts make up for their lack of social skills with rich inner lives, thoughts, and deep thinking. As a result, the introverted Borderline primarily focuses all their BPD emotions and reactions inward. Instead of having a rage episode in public, they might retreat to their rooms and cry for hours on end, perhaps even cutting themselves for their own amusement or as stress relief. Introverted Borderlines live in an odd world: on one hand, they spend most of their time in personal thought and reflection, looking to fill themselves with a viable sense of self; but on the other, they are conflicted by emptiness and the bottomless emotional pit that BPD produces. Introverted BPDs might be harder to “spot” unless you happen to know one personally, in which case you might notice occasional depressive symptoms and evidence of self harm.

Transparent Borderline—The Transparent Borderline is a bit of a mix between a high functioning borderline and either extroverted or introverted tendencies. In plain terms, Transparent Borderlines live double lives: on the surface, “in public”, they appear one way, but in private, amongst immediate family and friends, they appear completely different. As a result, they may or may not be high functioning due to this conflicted state of mind. Transparent Borderlines spend most of their emotional energy trying to balance the personality demands of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the both of which experience strong BPD emotions like anyone else with the disease. Like Introverted Borderlines, Transparent Borderlines are harder to spot, and often only confess their true disposition after a harrowing rage, major break up, or other severely traumatic event that brings all their BPD feelings to the fore.

Hi guys,

I was surfing the net for a safe place to.. well be able to say stuff without people looking at me like I'm nuts. I'm not diagnosed but I know there's something not quite right with me. I thought I was going completely crazy 3 years ago, it wasn't anything like my depression that I've had since I was 14. And I've been doing a lot better, more in control, sort of. I stumbled across this book: Get Me Out Of Here by Rachel Reiland, and it really hit a chord, I saw myself in her. I saw people in black and white, they were either wonderful or evil. My moods were everywhere. I self-harmed. I was so scared of rejection and abandonment I stayed in what was an abusive relationship. I was hysterical. Anything would trigger me into a rage. My boyfriend at the time just thought I was a child and crazy. By the end, I tried to take my life twice.

Fast forward to today, I'm alot better than I used to be. I'm back home with my Mum and brother. Reading the types of BDP I think I'm more of the transparent type. I hide it so well I fool myself, and then I wrestle with the thought of who is the 'real' me? To people outside of my Mum and brother I am normal, kind and quiet. But inside the house, I'm completely different. It's exhausting. Sometimes I think I'd rather a diagnostic, at least then I won't have to wonder. But.. I've been told before if I'm self-diagnosing myself, I probably don't have anything wrong with me, says a counsellor once upon a time.

Who knows?

Thanks for lending eyes to read, and hearts to understand, friends.

Jamcakes.

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  • 1 year later...

i am probaly a low function borderline because I can,t maintain relationship with anyone,and have had some really bad emotional outbursts throughtout my life.I get frustrated when I read about other borderlines because they seem to have some kind of relationship,family,friends SO,children.i can,t maintain anything like this,and it is beyond my comprehension how others with bpd do,i did intentive outpatient for 4 months of dbt,i have trouble understanding how it will help me much I was trying to explain to my dbt t that my moves swings are very rapid and happen in the middle of conversations where its not feasible for me to do skills in front of people every couple of minutes.My therpist said my behavior is better but I still have very deluded thinking,I am so frustrated because I feel anything I say or think on my own is wrong,i have trouble acting like a civlized person I guess I was worse before going to outpatient,I feel like it is implied I should be a hermit and not associate with people.

 

When I left my therapy group and everyone said goodbye to me I feel like they were slapping me in the face,a few people saw me as sarcastic and funny and told me I made them laugh alot.one person said I have a lot of anger lol Another said I was being sassy today,then  few people couldn,t think of anything to say I felt very hurt and angry everyone else when they left IOP seemed really postive and optimistic.I was sitting there smiling and getting mad,i have to repeat to myself i don,t always have a correct interiptaion of events in my head,it makes it very hard to be around anyone,or connect beyond my sarcastic joking manner.My therpist said to just keep going to the other outpatient group and said I can get better if I just keep going and don,t trust my cognitive distortions,it feels bad,that i can,t trust my interpretion of events.

 

From group I saw people see me in a more negative way then I see myself,I don,t give a good impression to other,people and im still hypersentive to what others say.

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