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Major Depressive Episode And Treatment For Depression Among Veterans Aged 21 To 39


Lindsay

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An estimated 9.3 percent of veterans aged 21 to 39 (312,000 persons) experienced at least one major depressive episode (MDE) in the past year

Recent research indicates that an estimated 25 to 30 percent of the veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have reported symptoms of a mental disorder or cognitive condition.1,2 Untreated mental health problems can result in long-term negative consequences for the affected individuals, their families, their communities, and our Nation as a whole.

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 8 months later...

I can only imagine that being a veteran could portentially cause a lot of trauma. You have probably seen many things that no one should have to see in this life time.

goo luck to you in your recovery and I hope that this forum helps. I think that in general we can and should be doing so much more for our veterans. Mental health is such a huge thing0- I hope that our government is also helping to take care of your needs and providing you with the assistance you need to feel better.

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  • 1 year later...

Surprisingly, my problems were mostly due to my marriage and my unit, rather than being sent to Iraq. I liked Iraq well enough, I would sit outside usually smoking during the rocket attacks on us until an NCO would order me into a bunker, and I didn't really want to go home to my unfaithful wife and kids who hated me.

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  • 6 months later...
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  • 1 month later...

I serverd from 1991-2002 and never saw combat but seen and heard what went on. I did do rotations to Saudi after the first war. I did a lot of the behind the seen stuff to get soldiers intel and kept them talking while in USAREUR. One of the things that gets me from time to time when I hear about I friend/co-worker that I knew when I was in was why did I not go to combat...... I gues its survivors guilt but I always feel like I should have been there and done my time.

Thanks to those that have and are serving.

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  • 3 months later...

I am also a veteran and I did not realize how much my experience in the military had been contributing to my depression. I always thought that it was only the death of my son that was causing my severe major depression, but it was, well I wouldn't say "the straw" that broke the camel's back, it was more like a dump truck full of anvils. But while working through that, it became quite obvious that I would also dwell on some rather traumatic things I experienced in the military that I had never really acknowledged before. All I can say to other vets, if you're having these problems, don't waste any time getting help, no one will look down on you for doing it, and you will be very glad you did.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm a veteran, although never served overseas but suffered a couple "situations" stateside that have me PTSD... I not work as a civilian for Marines and I deal with Marines being medically retired... So many of these veterans are being discharged due to depression and other mental illnesses. It breaks my heart. I just hope the stigma of seeking help equals being weak goes away. Depression is such an invisible disease and most people see us as "normal" when on the inside we're dying... You all are in my prayers.

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  • 2 weeks later...

My dad was in vietnam and was severely wounded. When he came home he drank heavily. When us kids came along he joined AA and quit; in my 33 years he's never had a drink. What he did do was completely shut down except episodes of anger. Like a stone hardly ever smiled joked or laughed and us kids still are affected by it. He finally dealt with his PTSD when we were grown and he's great, it's just to bad we lost those 20 or so years with him. Any vets out there should deal with it right away for your little ones.

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I served in the military but I never had to go into theatre thankfully. I feel for all those that did. I look at the hardships I endured but it is nothing compared to what you men and women did. Even if you weren't on the front line you still had to give up everything, your life, your friends. Most people will never understand how hard that is. Most people will never understand how hard it is to go back to civilian life after being exposed to the situations the military puts you in.

I have friends that have stood there and watched their friends be killed right in front of them, and it takes a toll on them, it is visually obvious that they still hurt.

There needs to be more resources and help readily available for vets especially those returning from combat. I know they're making new strides and I commend them for that but it still isn't enough for these guys.

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  • 7 months later...

I have seen a couple combat tours, the first being Desert Shield/Storm and last being Iraqi Freedom. I have had a few deployments but I will not get into that. I know and seen too much to talk about. There are many things that have left me more than upset and I will not talk about it other than it has been the cause of my mental issues. I will say that I was first diagnosed 7 years ago, Major Depreesion, PTSD, among other issues and have been getting help through the Army. Counseling, meds, keeping a positive lifestyle, therapeutic activities, no problems. I came on here for a few months then left. After several years I have returned, realizing that nothing has really changed for me. I am stable. I have support there is no reason for me to be like this. But I recently found that there are actual changes in the brain, and brain physiology (if thats the right word) and for me the damage cannot be completely reversed. I have learned to accept and manage rather that to "fight it" or "fake it" and fake being happy when I am not. In addition to other permanent medical issues, I have to live with this neurological , sometimes debilitating "disease" or disorder. Ever second, every day for the rest of my life. I can understand why some people cannot take it any longer and commit suicide. Its like I am incarcerated in a tiny room with no light and I will be there until the day I die. I feel like I am going mad sometimes, but the meds have kept me from becoming unstable. I know that many here understand what I am saying and that is why I have returned after 7 years. Simply "dealing with it " changes nothing. I have learned from others that "acceptance" can be a positive thing. I still have no interest in anything anymore but I will not let it degrade my life. I do not go out anymore but I do not neglect my quality of life, responsibilities and environment. I am a musician and I play video games. These two things have kept me from negative consequences of me trying to "socialize" with people who have no idea about the realities that I have had to deal with. Society has no idea. Some kid thought that Osama Bin Laden was a rock band. The kid's parents did not even care. I am keeping my name witheld because I am well known. I am "venting" and that act of doing this, talking about it, helps me. The fact that Depression Forums is allowing this helps me. Perhaps others can see a therapeutic value in this as well.

Edited by svendorrian
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  • 1 year later...

Not to mention the toxic mold used as a weapon. Mold is so poisonous to the brain, causing inflammation and all kinds of secondary trauma. My job pays very little, but I stay because it's such a wonderful cause. I collect donations for large care packages for active duty soldiers, and to benefit the VA hospitals. We salute you and thank you for your service!

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  • 3 weeks later...

Most of my Battle Buddies I have spoken with have agreed that life was better in Afghanistan, more alive.

Dealing with things back home was the problem, either while away or after coming home.

Spouses, family, work, friggin civilians (no we actually love you) no sence of urgency for anything!

Total frustration and lack of a quality reitegration back into society.  Sure the Army and DOD have awesome policies on reintegration, but none are implamented with any effort, so you reap what you sow...broken Vets.

 

In my current state I could function better in Combat then here, in combat there are difinitive actions and consequences, in civilian life everything is an option and drama based.  That is what is crushing a good number of us.

 

Adrenalin junkie withdrawl?

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  • 1 year later...

Desert storm Vet here..actually i had ETSed before the build up to the first gulf war but got recalled as an IRR.  I was glad to go as i dont think i would have forgiven myself for being home while my friends went.  my time in the military was less stressful than the world after.  i had bouts of depression in my early years in the Army and being forced to go to counciling was not helpful, neither was a chaplain who acted like i was faking it.  

but aside from that i had a sense of purpose that is lacking right now in life

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