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iWantRope

Can the clinically depressed achieve workplace competence?

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Asking because disability for depression don't exist in my country

So if one is depressed, can he/she still achieve competent work performance under workplace pressure? (like multiple service-level agreements that must be fulfilled concurrently, & they're measured in minutes)

P.S. in many offices workplace competence are appraised for management to not just consider eligibility for salary increment, but whether to terminate employment contract also. Whether an employee has any mental illness is never taken into consideration

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The short answer is No. I could never be anything I ever dreamed of being. And the way the world is now and the people in it, I don't think it even matters. People don't care how you feel, it's all about screwing someone over and getting that money!!!!! 

 

If this makes no sense please disregard 😆

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I'll never amount to anything.  What do you do?  What have you done with your life?  I could shrug my shoulders and making a grunting sound and pretty much sum up the whole thing.

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I respectfully disagree.  Depression will always tell you that you cannot succeed in the workplace.  But remember people, depression lies!  

Having said that, there are some workplaces and types of work that would be a lot more difficult than others.  Which places and conditions would be best depends on the individual.  I was going to list good and bad things to watch for, but that would only be my opinion.  

I believe those with depression can succeed in the workplace IF the depression is not too severe and the workplace is not overwhelming.  And remember, even if one attempt (or more!) does not succeed, that does not make you a failure!  Some of the most successful people in history failed multiple times first.  (Thomas Edison, Steve Jobs, Colonel Harland Sanders -- started KFC restaurants, ...)  The list is endless!  Search for "successful failures in history".  Turns out (to rephrase an old saying), if at first you don't succeed, you've got lots of company.

Best wishes, and good luck!  🍀 

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Yes.

I know nothing about your workplace or your duties. I couldn't argue if your work is suitable for someone living with clinical depression or any other mental health diagnosis.

I do think self-stigma is a form of cruelty towards oneself and I've worked hard to personally overcome that. Therefore I must believe that a person living with clinical depression can not only achieve competence in the workplace but thrive, excel -- even in highly competitive environments -- if that person has sufficient support systems. 

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6 hours ago, Atra said:

if that person has sufficient support systems. 

There is no such thing as "support systems". Humans are a selfish & impatient species, the ones in any workplace only know how to say "deal with this asap".. Depressed or not, a person needs to help himself/herself because no one else in this world will!

I kinda agree with @watalife POV more & more

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17 hours ago, iWantRope said:

There is no such thing as "support systems". Humans are a selfish & impatient species, the ones in any workplace only know how to say "deal with this asap".. Depressed or not, a person needs to help himself/herself because no one else in this world will!

I kinda agree with @watalife POV more & more

That is not my experience or my reality, though I will accept this is as your reality.

There are such things as support systems. You and the other members of this forum are one example of the kind of support from others that I rely on. It is outside my workplace and yet has a very direct impact on my ability to thrive in tense conditions at work. 

Overall, I agree that many workplaces fail at encouraging good mental health in employees. Many don't have EAPs or other supports, but some do and I find those jobs more attractive. In my former career my awful job contributed to my depression, a big reason I felt I had to make a change. When I realized it had become a better risk to embrace the unknown. 

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I believe people with depression can succeed in the workplace. This is because many of them have worked jobs or went to highshool or college.

Part of it depends on education.  People who educated, skilled and positive are attractive to employers will get better opportunities. Also the severitity of the depression matters as well so its important to self care.

That is the reality. People may think humans are selfish but we are all humans and its important to see not just where employers fail but where we fail as well.

Many people throughout history have made accomplishments despite their flaws and/or impediments. Just take a look at some silly leaders or celebrities. If they can do it we can all definitely do it!

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You can search on “high functioning depression,” which is a type of mild depression seen in very highly successful people — with the pattern that the depression seems to come from the emptiness of other areas in life besides work. Though there are still cases in these types where it’s serious enough to cause suicidal thoughts, though it’s less common with these types. It often seems to happen more with the bipolar type depression particularly — where someone manages to have a very successful time, but stress triggered a sudden depressive episode that caused suicidal thoughts. I’m sure a visit online of “Famous people who committed suicide,” can show you more real life unfortunate examples. “Celebrities with mental illnesses,” is a less serious term to look at. 

Honestly, my depression growing up has pressured me to work very long hours in school growing up from all the criticism on not being perfect, rather than it making me lazy, and I’ve been suffering from some health issues now because of it. That is, my asthma growing up has gotten worse, and well I still accomplish a lot of work, but I have to slow down. These days I seem better though with a lot of mindfulness issues. People have different responses to insecure thoughts. Some people’s perfectionist thoughts of needing to be perfect make them give up trying much, and others overwork themselves trying to fix the issue. Whether it involves working hard in exercise, relationships, volunteering and so on — my reaction is more of the latter, honestly. 

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Competence, yes. Don't think we're likely to excel though, but why should we anyway? 

I know for a fact that I've had countless times when I could justify to HR going on long term sick for mental health but I've never been able to justify it to myself. Sometimes I think I'd be worse off if I were off work, even with all its frustrations and stresses. 

Now I'm coming at this from a British angle, I have no idea what protection there is in the US. Here, for now at least, we've got the Equality Act which makes it illegal to discriminate against a list of protected characteristics, and mental health is one of them. Course, as far as employment goes it's worthless to anyone who doesn't have a permanent contracted job with guaranteed hours. I've had over 20 jobs and only one of them has been permanent. I once did three years as a temp in the same place, no guaranteed hours, just fortunate that they kept coming. If they wanted rid of me they wouldn't have even had to sack me, no disciplinary routes or procedures or anything like that, they could've sent me home mid-shift or called me telling me not to come in any time they wanted and I'd have had no come back. Still, there's a hell of a lot of lipservice out there from employers who want to be seen to care about mental health, but very little to back that up.

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