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Natural Ways to Fight Your Depression


RAMZY

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While it is a norm to have a medication for your depression after consulting your physician, there is no denial to the fact that apart from these regular meds, there are some natural ways by adopting which you can get some relief from your depression.

Listed below are some of the few natural methods that I found quite effective.

1.      Exercise

When in a depressed mood, this would be the last option that you would consider to go with but studies have proved that exercising helps you relax your mind and gives you a calming effect.

2.      Go Out & Explore Different stuff, Get Your Daily Sunshine Dose

You would want to stay inside and lock yourself in one room in the dark when depressed, this you should try to avoid. Gather some energy and go out, explore different things, meet new people and take your daily dose of sunshine which is very important for you in terms of your vitamin D supplements.

3.      Do Your Regular Work & Sleep Well

Try to follow your regular routine as much as possible. This keeps you busy in productive things and you are avoided from indulging in negative thoughts.

4.      Pet Therapy

Pet therapy is one the most important natural way to overcome depression as you get an unconditional love, support and companion in the form of your pet. They keep you moving all day and give you a good purpose to your life. These specially trained pets are called Emotional Support Animals and you get a license for them to keep them with you at home or anywhere outside.

5.      Do Yoga & Deep Breathing

Yoga in combination with deep breathing is a great activity to perform for a depressed person as it enhances the mood and provide a relaxed mentality.

                                                                                              

These are a few natural ways for me to overcome depression. Let me know any other natural remedy that you know.

 

 

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Okay I'll add my " too sense".

All of the above points are very helpful.

I tend to see depression as a natural condition/formation/resource.

I compare depression to a metaphorical cave.

In nature caves are formed by erosion, stress and upheaval.

(Sound familiar?)

The ENTRANCE to a cave  is also the EXIT.

Trying to figure out how a cave was formed DOESN'T change the cave.

(Endless therapy anyone?)

A metaphorical cave is a great place to consign useless emotional baggage.

A cave is a deep, dark, dangerous place.

Not a place to go too deep or fool around.

Personally I try to "anchor" myself outside my depression cave.

The idea is to be clever with powerful metaphors or as I like to call them "Cleverful MEDaphors".

Food for thought maybe?

My motto: DESPAIR not/REPAIR a lot.

Oscar

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Something else not mentioned is video games because I have to put so much focus into playing the games that my mind shuts off for a while.  Exercise helps me when the weather is well enough to walk or run outside.  For me indoor exercise while I'm doing it makes things worse because the only thing there is to do while staring at the wall is think.  Afterwards I do feel much better but it takes everything in me to get through it.

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Spending time with folks whom I have meaning connections with, this replenishes me. 

Support groups. Depression is by in large an invisible disease. Being around other people living with depression is a way to be seen and talking about it is a way to feel heard and understood. 

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Great thread, all methods Ramsey mentioned are important steps to recovery.

I use meditation before bed using breathing and body scanning technique. All with a view to getting better sleep.

I use an app called insight timer but others are available.10 to 20 mins of meditation usually calms me down enough to get at least a couple of hours sleep, well mostly.

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On 2/1/2020 at 8:14 AM, sober4life said:

Something else not mentioned is video games because I have to put so much focus into playing the games that my mind shuts off for a while.  Exercise helps me when the weather is well enough to walk or run outside.  For me indoor exercise while I'm doing it makes things worse because the only thing there is to do while staring at the wall is think.  Afterwards I do feel much better but it takes everything in me to get through it.

Video Games...  oh yes, that's a great addition to the list indeed. It requires your great focus in the game which diverts you from all the problems for some time.

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Are you talking about therapeutic benefits of having your own pets? Or sessions with a trained therapy animal? I know a bit about both. First thing I want to do is clarify some terms, because it's easy to mix up therapy animals vs. service animals vs. emotional support animals. 

-A therapy animal (usually a dog) will generally work with groups. They visit hospitals, group homes, schools, etc. They have to go through some training and a test to prove they can behave well with larger groups of people. 

-A service animal provides essential services to one person, like a seeing-eye dog. They require months of training, must be certified, and can legally go anywhere with their owner, even places that do not normally allow dogs.

-An emotional support animal is really just a pet. They can be any animal and do not get any special training. If a person has a disorder or disability, and a good claim that their pet helps them emotionally cope with things, their doctor can write them a prescription to designate their pet an ESA. This gives them the ability to have a pet even if their landlord does not generally allow it. Your right to an ESA is protected in the home, but you cannot legally take them into places that don't allow pets, because they are not trained or certified. There have been issues lately with people downloading fake certificates and buying fake vests so that they can try to take their ESAs into restaurants and such, but that is illegal and unethical, because the ESAs misbehave and create a negative perception of real service dogs. 

 

Sorry for the ramble! Anyway, here are some of my experiences. I sat in on some group sessions with a therapy dog when I worked at a mental health hospital. I was there as an employee, not a patient, but it was still fun to observe. A volunteer facilitator would bring in her super adorable, very calm and cuddly Bernese mountain dog. He'd walk around and let people pet him, and the facilitator would ask questions and have people share their experiences with pets. It was pretty cool. I saw some very depressed people light up a bit when they got to pet the dog. The affection of an animal can feel really good.

Having your own pets is really good for your mental health too. I got my first cat when I was 20, and he was an absolute godsend. For a few years I lived alone, and was miserably depressed. I swear, some days he was the thing that kept me going. It's so good to feel needed. I knew I had to hang on because my little guy depended on me. He died last year, and I still miss him terribly.

These days I live with my husband, and we have two new cats (the cute babies in my profile picture) and a dog. The cats are just hilarious. They play together and it is so funny, some days they're the only thing that makes me crack a smile. The dog is also very sweet and loving, and going for walks with him is really healthy for both of us. If I had to move and couldn't find a place that allowed pets, I would definitely ask my psychiatrist to write me a note to say they are emotional support animals so that they could stay with me. My mental health would definitely deteriorate without my fuzz-babies. 

 

__________________________________________________________

I also want to add another natural depression treatment: Food. Trying to eat a varied, healthy diet can really make a difference. If your body isn't getting vital nutrients, it can contribute to depression. Vitamin D is a noteworthy example, but lots of other vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients are involved in the way your brain works. This is like exercise, in that it can be really hard to do when you're already depressed. You either lose your appetite and struggle to eat anything, or you eat low-nutrient, starchy snack foods because they're easy to eat, don't require cooking, and give you a brief dopamine rush. Taking small steps, like snacking on baby carrots instead of Doritos, can help with progress toward healing depression. 

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Reading helps, it's the main thing that has helped me as far as natural things. I am hesitant to say any type of reading though. I have exclusively read mostly math textbooks (it doesn't matter what level it is) and then do some problems after I'm done. Recently, I switch over CAD drawing exercises using AutoCAD. It could be the problem solving combined with reading, I'm really not sure.....or, it could be a simple as reading a book so definitely try it. And it's very important that it's a long reading session as well, short times have never really helped me. I spend hours reading doing problems now. Of course, when I was really sick, forget it, it never would have happen due to the anhedonia.  That's the death of every bit of your interest...it doesn't matter how "strong" an individual your are, it's the death of an individual too. Reading can help though!

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Yes, reading has been part of my recoveries in the past. No matter how Ill I've been, not really taking in or understanding plot lines, characters etc of a novel, the act of reading the words has some therapeutic value.

Deep breathing techniques have also helped me. The technique s I use were passed to me. Can be found by Google 'nimetu antidepressant' My breathing gets really shallow in depression, especially at the panic stage and daily breathing exercises can sort that out.

tt

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Here is a super list I have learned from various people

With self

-smiling

-exercise

-rituals

-laughter yoga

-power poses

-positive affirmations

-sleep

-accomplishments

With environment

-sunlight

-plants

-ASMR

-music

-aromatherapy

-therapy animals

-positive role models

With edibles

-hydration

-vitamin d and b12

-dark chocolate

-red wine (depends if you drink or not)

 

 

 

 

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  • 4 months later...
  • 4 weeks later...

I am looking to buy an emotional support animal....a lady I had met in one of the groups said since nothing worked for her depression as far as treatments, she has found some relief from the Labrador she got a few years ago. does anyone have any experience with that??

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On 2/11/2020 at 11:39 AM, RAMZY said:

Does anyone had any interesting experience of a pet therapy for their depression or any other mental health problem? If yes, please share with us what animal you had and how did it helped you.

did you look into it? i am looking into it now, and i will let you know..

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16 minutes ago, ladysmurf said:

I am looking to buy an emotional support animal....a lady I had met in one of the groups said since nothing worked for her depression as far as treatments, she has found some relief from the Labrador she got a few years ago. does anyone have any experience with that??

I don't know about emotional support animals specifically but I do know the perfect pet will certainly make you feel better!

Edited by sober4life
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2 hours ago, sober4life said:

I don't know about emotional support animals specifically but I do know the perfect pet will certainly make you feel better!

Is it same for aquatic aquarium pets like fish or opae ula?

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3 hours ago, ladysmurf said:

I am looking to buy an emotional support animal....a lady I had met in one of the groups said since nothing worked for her depression as far as treatments, she has found some relief from the Labrador she got a few years ago. does anyone have any experience with that??

I've never had one for that purpose but the brief time in my life when I was optimistic and energetic did coincide with having a pet rat. I don't know if he contributed to that or not, but either way he was wonderfully affectionate, well behaved, and I loved him dearly. Having him around made my whole world great. For a while.

 

Although wickedly allergic to both them and dogs, I've always been around cats, and they are very sensitive to my struggles. A good fluffy, snuggly one with a motor is never a bad thing. Unless, of course, you're wickedly allergic.

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15 hours ago, iWantRope said:

Is it same for aquatic aquarium pets like fish or opae ula?

I am definitely not an expert, but it is my understanding that an aquarium can be helpful but in a different way.  Watching fish in an aquarium has been shown to be calming and can even help to lower high blood pressure.  A pet that you can directly interact with (touch) like a cat, dog, or guinea pig can have different benefits.  The actual touch can be similar to hugging a person.  Dogs need to be taken out for walks which encourages you to get out of your home and exercise.  Cats (well, most of them 😉) cuddle up which is comforting; and their purring has been shown to have health benefits.  (The exact effects are still being studied.)  Also, needing to take care of a pet and their attempts to get your attention help keep you from dwelling on downward spiraling thoughts.  I am sure there is more information on the internet.

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On 7/14/2020 at 8:20 PM, iWantRope said:

Is it same for aquatic aquarium pets like fish or opae ula?

Can Any Animal be an Emotional Support Animal?

Almost any animal can be prescribed to provide an individual with a psychological disability.

The best way to look at it is, if it would be kept as a pet, it can also be used as an ESA. Naturally, a wild animal such as a polar bear definitely wouldn’t be suitable, but any domesticated animal such as the most typical options like cats and dogs, down to spiders and snakes can be used – whatever the individual being treated is comfortable with and can adequately care for. As long as the animal contributes towards the individual’s wellbeing, there are no real restrictions as to the type of animal to be used.

 

I will say probably talk to your doctor. i think it can be any animal from what the organization says, as long as it helps you with your illness and you feel better, i don't see why not.  I'm not sure I can post the website here, but look ESA

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