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hellnbak

Do You Accept That You May Have To Take Your Ad's For The Rest Of Your Life?

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If I just accept it and take them forever I could get long term side effects.

The long term side effects of depression are much more severe and deadly. I'm not going to list them because you already know what they are, but I will tell you that recent animal studies have shown that depression and anxiety **** brain cells. Yes, depression and anxiety damage your brain. Something else they observed is that antidepressants stimulate neurogenesis. Yes, ADs heal the brain by stimulating the birth of new brain cells. You can read about it yourself by Googling neurogenesis and antidepressants.

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If I just accept it and take them forever I could get long term side effects.

The long term side effects of depression are much more severe and deadly. I'm not going to list them because you already know what they are, but I will tell you that recent animal studies have shown that depression and anxiety **** brain cells. Yes, depression and anxiety damage your brain. Something else they observed is that antidepressants stimulate neurogenesis. Yes, ADs heal the brain by stimulating the birth of new brain cells. You can read about it yourself by Googling neurogenesis and antidepressants.

I'll do that Burgy, thanks.

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but how do you KNOW that this will always be the way.......how do you KNOW that this is a permanent illness for you?

I think the question of why some people KNOW they will be on ADs for the rest of their life and why some people do "get over" depression and go on to live life without ADs is really interesting.

It's definitely NOT true that everyone who takes AD's takes them forever. I know people who took them for a few years while they went through major depression/nervous breakdown as a result of traumatic life circumstances, and then, after intense therapy etc, their life situation changed, they came off the ADs and they have stayed off them with no relapse after many years.

I guess it must depend on the type of depression, the brain chemistry of the individual and the particular life circumstance that made them depressed in the first place.

I'm just guessing, but I think that if you have PTSD, like Hellnbak says here, then maybe there really is a very good chance that you will get over it with therapy and that the ADs will just be something you need for the shortterm.

And then there are people like me who have this thing called dysthymia, which is long-term moderate depression. I've had this for over 20 years and I can manage it fairly well with medication (and after lots of therapy), but I really don't think I'm ever going to be "over it", and each time I have tried coming of ADs, I've relapsed badly, so I'm just not going to try coming off them again.

Anyhow, wish you luck Hellnbak and thanks for posting a really interesting topic.

Joanna

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Just a question that has been rattling around in my head.

I take citalopram and have done for just over 2 years. I tried to stop them not so long ago and ended up suicidal so quickly put myself back on them. It taught me a lesson.

A. Don't cold turkey if you want to stop AD's

B. I can't live without them

The thought that I may have to take them for the rest of my life though, is rather depressing to me in itself.

Have you accepted the fact you may be on AD's forever, or do you believe that in time, you will be able to stop taking them?

I'm pretty sure this is different for everyone. Personally, I couldn't imagine ever being of ADs, I'm pretty sure my depression is chronic, but I could be wrong. Also, I have OCD so i will probably be on ADs for that for the rest of my life. The way i see it, you wouldn't take insulin away from a diabetic, and you shouldn't take ADs away from a depressive.

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The long term side effects of depression are much more severe and deadly. I'm not going to list them because you already know what they are, but I will tell you that recent animal studies have shown that depression and anxiety **** brain cells. Yes, depression and anxiety damage your brain. Something else they observed is that antidepressants stimulate neurogenesis. Yes, ADs heal the brain by stimulating the birth of new brain cells. You can read about it yourself by Googling neurogenesis and antidepressants.

This is really interesting! Thanks for the info Burgy!

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The doctors surgery I go to explained that if you have three bad experiences with depression, they will recommend meds for the rest of your life. Of course I don't HAVE to take them, but I KNOW I need to take them.

This is no worry to me, because I know I would not be here without meds.

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I think I've managed to accept that I'll be on mood stabilisers for life - I'm bipolar - but... I get a feeling I'll probably try to get off them at some stage, despite knowing 99% that it won't work.

:hearts:

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Everytime I've gone off my meds I've relapsed within 3months. I've been off and on meds for the past 10 years. This has happenned about 4 times, each time I've gone back on Aropax and it has worked fine. This last time though I reacted badly to taking aropax again so I had to discontinue it, tried zoloft didn't work, and am now trying Effexor. I wish I'd never gone off the meds as I've had a really rough couple of months trying to find another med to go on.

Since the last relapse I've decided I'd rather bee on meds for life than have to go through relapsing, start up side effects and waiting for the drugs to kick in.

When I'd feel good on meds I'd start to think "I don't need these I fee fine", then I'd relapse after being off the meds and realise I was fine BECAUSE of the meds. I've learnt the hard way but I know now that I need to be on medication for my anxiety.

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I find it interesting that so many of you have no problems with taking medications for the rest of your life. Since i posted this topic my AD's have been changed and i am now taking prozac and promazine (an anti-psychotic). I guess it's because i see it as my 'aim' to 'get better' that makes me question a lifetime of medication. I want to be free from the evil in my head....i would try anything to get rid. I am even considering an exorcism...you never know maybe it will free me from my illness.

In the meantime i carry on taking my meds like a programmed robot.....they subdue me and my mind, but what i would give to not HAVE to take them........and the idea of 'for the rest of my life' still depresses me......

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I won't say that I accept it fully. I still hope that one day I'll be "normal" and be off of meds. I done it before though and I always end of worse the next time around. This time I'm starting or at least trying to come to terms with it. This time it was bad enough to put me in a hospital and see a therapist and a psychiatrist for the first time in my life. And, I can't see him adding a little of this and taking away a little of that only to say "we're done, your cured."

I guess I should say I'm still undecided.

Lost in the Past

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Hi all,

I have accepted that I will need meds the rest of

my life. My problem is that they only work for

3-4 years before they poop out and I have to

switch to another med. That switchover period

is the pits! Anyone else have this problem?

best wishes,

starr

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The long term side effects of depression are much more severe and deadly. I'm not going to list them because you already know what they are, but I will tell you that recent animal studies have shown that depression and anxiety **** brain cells. Yes, depression and anxiety damage your brain. Something else they observed is that antidepressants stimulate neurogenesis. Yes, ADs heal the brain by stimulating the birth of new brain cells. You can read about it yourself by Googling neurogenesis and antidepressants.

This is really interesting! Thanks for the info Burgy!

The above is something that I was not aware of, that depression kills brain cells, interesting. I accept that I may have to be on meds for the rest of my life. I've been on them for 31 years now. Up until a little over 4 years ago i was on a high dose of meds. I have worked with cognitive behavioral therapy, CBT, over the last 7 years and that plus exercise have reduced my anti-Ds by 85% in the last 4 years. I was on anti-anxiety meds from age 27 to age 53. I've been totally off of anti-anxiety meds for 4 plus years and have done great. It's the CBT skills and the exercise which has done that for me.

I don't believe, myself, that anti-depressants can heal the brain. I believe it's our own thinking which changes as a result of being on anti-depressants which heals the brain. If there are scientific studies which prove otherwise please email me and let me look at them. This has been my experience, both at age 18 and now. I believe that in the majority of cases it is our thinking which is the problem that causes us to be clinically depressed. Change or stop the negative, painful thinking and the brain can heal itself, which may involve neurogenesis. There are studies supporting this theory which I can refer anyone to on the net, but you will have to email me. We're not allowed to post links on threads. Dr. David D. Burns also supports this theory. Thinking is an electrical and chemical process which, in my opinion, can cause a depletion or lack of neurotransmitters and good balance of chemicals if it is very negative and cause clinical depression, or if our thinking becomes healthy can restore a good balance of neurotransmitters and chemicals to heal the brain. Again, there are studies suported by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) and other reputable organizations which support this theory. The most recent of such studies have been conducted withtin the last 6 years. Email me if you would like to read about them. I have also found one of these studes referenced on this webstie as well.

I am still hoping against hope that I can be off of meds at some point totally. I am always having to adjust them every so often or they stop working for whatever reason. They are a godsend, but not a solution to psychological problems, in my opinion. If psychological problems got us into our hole, we can climb out by solving those problems psychologically. During this process some of us may need to be on meds.

Edited by Bryce2k5

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My first psychiatrist told me that I'd be on for a year, tops. I finally found my 2nd one, who took her time breaking it to me that #1 was wrong. I felt like everything I'd worked so hard for: getting healthy, strong, stable, was shot to sh*t. If I had to be on meds for life, what was the point of even trying? It took me backwards, waaaaaaay backwards for awhile.

I'm finally STARTING to wrap my head around it. But I don't like it.

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My apologies to suburgatory. I did find a report today which states that ADs do grow new brain cells. This is news to me. I still think there are other factors involved, but that is what the report concludes, so my apologies.

I tried to live and function for 30 years on meds, but found that every year or two needed to adjust the med or try different meds. And I was still trying to cope with stress in the same dysfunctional way I had learned growing up. It simply didn't work well. In addition, the side effects in my case of overeating, impared sexual function, can't sit still at times are very uncomfortable and have caused me to be on average of 30 pounds over weight for much of my adult life. The meds make me tired at times and used to prevent me from concentrating and being able to retain what I had read when I was on a much higher dose. Just too many side effects. CBT helped me to come down drastically on meds to where I can now study, concentrate, and not overeat as much. Weight has dropped a little. Meds are good. I still could not function without them, but CBT has shown me there is another way to think which I have discovered has been my primary problem. Some diseases, such as bi-polar, schizophrenia, etc. are physiological in nature and require meds. But I don't buy that a psychologically induced depression can be as effectively dealt with through meds as learning how to think differently. That has not been my experience. Clinical studies in the last 6 years show that CBT is just as effective as meds in treating severe depression and can prevent a relapse. There is a higher rate of relapse if the only therapy used has been meds because the individual has not learned that his/her thinking is part of the problem.

Edited by Bryce2k5

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I went off the meds too, for other reasons then conquerring it naturally, because within a week of tapering I didn't sleep and went to work on one hours sleep a day. This eventually triggered self-harm and suicide thoughts, and very bizarre and disturbing OCD compulsions like electrocuting myself. Every day I went like this, feeling that I could take my life at any time, anywhere, so my motivation was rock bottom to work. I wanted to be locked up in a straight-jacket. That was scary, and was made even worse by my reaction to anti-depressants which were all very severe that I went to an emergency room. So the doctors were causing anxiety by saying they would not prescribe me any more. I knew I could not survive without the drugs, because they worked for me in the past, and the feeling I was getting off them, was the demon which had made life so hard to live for the fifteen years before it. Every day fear of acting on a compulsion. Suicide was my next step.

After four A&E referralls for attempted suicide over two weeks, I tried a tryclic AD which I foolishly stopped after one day because it made me drowsy. Hysterical and always anxious and feeling death upon me, I began sleeping a bit better. Then work gave me a new, non-stressful role, and the ability to go in afternoons because I wasn't sleeping. I was still depressed. And then after two months they have started to work. I am a different person. I need that kick to give me the energy to want to live, because the price for not having treatment was death.

So yes, AD's for me, I can take any side effects as long as I am not the person I've been for the past three months.

The meds are a life saver for me. I am certain without them I would be dead.

Edited by kirkwuk

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I've been taking ADs since about April when I wnet into the hospital for the first time. To be quite honest, I know part of me has not accepted that I am sick. Heck, it's hard for me to even type it. I don't particularly like taking those pills. Maybe in time I will learn to accept it but right now I'm still fighting it, always trying to convince myself that I don't need them.

I worry about myself.

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I am a lifer. I have tried therapy but unfortunately I just didnt get anything from it.

It was probably my fault but I do try to exercise and I am now trying to eat better.

I am willing to do whatever it takes to stay feeling well but I dont think I could do it

without my meds,

best wishes,

starr

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I personally think that I will have to rely on mine for a long time. If it is the rest of my life, so be it. This is an illness that I have no control over that medicines help. As with any illness, if meds are needed and work you take them for as long as needed. I had wished I would only have to take meds for a short time and be "cured". I no longer think this. We have to work hard every day to feel well. And if we just take it one day at a time....we will all make it through the hard times.

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I'm on them for life. I've accepted it now, but I did not do so easily. I fought against it for many years and had episode after episode. All that railing against it actually entrenched the neural pathways, making it more and more likely to recur. So I was shooting myself in the foot all those years and made it worse for myself. My previous psychiatrist said to think of it as "insurance".

As far as long term effects go and any damage they may cause me: I've accepted that too. We all have to die of something. If they shorten my life, so be it. I don't want to live that long anyways - just more time for more drugs to poop out and more relapses to occur. I know that's cynical and maybe it's just because every day is an ordeal right now.

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I dont think ive completeyl come to let myself understand that ill be on them forever.....wow thats wierd

but i feel like who cares, if its what i need then so be it....theyres so many more poeple out there on multiple medications, why are AD's any different....and plus if its what makes you feel yourself, then its a good thing! :hearts:

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I'll be on them for life. I'd love to be able to go off them at some point, but barring some miracle cure, that's not going to happen for me.

Talk therapy can really help, but in the end, when the old neurotransmitters aren't there, you still can't feel the normal range of emotions. Trust me, I've tried!

I look at it this way: It could be worse. I could spend the rest of my life off of them......

And after trying to go off, I know better.

Take care,

Dewayne

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It's unlikely I'll ever be able to safely go off my meds, since I've got progressive BP. There's always the chance that I'll just keep getting worse without treatment, and where it would stop nobody knows. So, while I HATE taking meds, it's just not worth the risk of dementia, hallucinations, and suicide. :hearts:

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