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Adjusting your own meds if your doctor screws them up?


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I know this is usually a very bad idea, but if you have a doctor that is perscribing meds that make you feel even worse than before, can someone learn enough about the meds in question to at least avoid doing something dangerous?  I know many people here would say the obvious answer in that case is to find a different doctor, but I have - 3 times!  At this point I have had it!  I can understand that psychiatry involves some trial and error.  I can understand that doctors are human too, and are bound to make an occasional mistake.  However, I cannot accept 3 different doctors making me pay out the nose for their services that don't even help.

I don't really want to mess with these kinds of situations on my own, and am certainly not advocating for others to do so, but I really don't know what else to do at this point.  So, does anyone have some advice about this situation? I'm sorry that I'm not being very clear, but my thought process isn't particularity coherent as of now.  Thank you in advance.

Edited by Wizardwarrior315
Minor screwup
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Contact your doctor and let them know it isn't working! I don't know about other people, but mine stresses phoning him and gives me his number nearly every time I see him if I have any issues. Without feedback from us they can't adjust our treatment to our needs.

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15 minutes ago, LouisRiel said:

Contact your doctor and let them know it isn't working! I don't know about other people, but mine stresses phoning him and gives me his number nearly every time I see him if I have any issues. Without feedback from us they can't adjust our treatment to our needs.

I've tried that.  The doctor usually just makes excuses and/or recommends switching to an equally useless medicine.  The willingness to listen is there, but a working plan is not.  Either that or I'm just a very rare case I guess.

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6 minutes ago, Wizardwarrior315 said:

I've tried that.  The doctor usually just makes excuses and/or recommends switching to an equally useless medicine.  The willingness to listen is there, but a working plan is not.  Either that or I'm just a very rare case I guess.

Do you focus on saying it doesn't work or on your symptoms that they can use to get a better idea? Not judging you they can just have an ego and don't always respond well to criticism. Is it a GP or pdoc? it makes a big difference.

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I stopped one cold turkey when I couldn't manage to get out to refill my script and then couldn't bother to restart. It was a terrible idea since my doctor only adds one med at a time so I had to wait a few months to add to my new medication I was slowly increasing.

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10 minutes ago, LouisRiel said:

Do you focus on saying it doesn't work or on your symptoms that they can use to get a better idea? Not judging you they can just have an ego and don't always respond well to criticism. Is it a GP or pdoc? it makes a big difference.

I do in fact try to offer helpful advice, and all 3 were pdocs.

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i've been through quite a few docs and therapists before i found ones who were in it for my well being and not just my $$$, point is if you tried and gave them sufficient time to listen and understand what you're saying kick them to the curb,  they are supposed to know more than us about the meds so that's why we have to be patient and give it time to work and when it doesn't work something has to change, either the treatment type or the treatment administrator, i am not a fan of self medication, been there made that mistake but that's me you may be good with making the adjustments,  best of luck, hope you find the right solution

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I had a lot of trial and error with my pdoc too before I stick to this prescription. Everyone of us is unique and our brain is not being fully understood. So, doctors can only trial and error to see how u react to the meds and if the meds helps. Changing meds, increasing/decreasing dosage is part of it.

I know u feel frustrated. But hang in there. I stopped my medication once, few years back, thinking that they doesn't help. It was a terrible mistake. I harm myself, and ended up with 30+ stitches because I am unable to control my anger.

Give you and your pdoc some time. Let your body search through the meds prescribed and find the one that suits it the most.

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 Hi Wizardwarrior315,

     Sorry for the ordeal you are going through!!!  How awful!!!

    Are you under any major stress [other than depression]?  I don't know, but I've heard that excess stress works against and can defeat antidepressant chemotherapy. In my own situation, I was taught certain coping skills for reducing stress and that seemed to help my medication regimen to become more effective.  Not sure it would work for you or others though.

       I sure hope you find something that helps you.  You are such a nice person!  - epictetus

     

Edited by Epictetus
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12 hours ago, Epictetus said:

 Hi Wizardwarrior315,

     Sorry for the ordeal you are going through!!!  How awful!!!

    Are you under any major stress [other than depression]?  I don't know, but I've heard that excess stress works against and can defeat antidepressant chemotherapy. In my own situation, I was taught certain coping skills for reducing stress and that seemed to help my medication regimen to become more effective.  Not sure it would work for you or others though.

       I sure hope you find something that helps you.  You are such a nice person!  - epictetus

     

Thank you!  I would like to hear about what you learned if that's ok with you. 

In addition to depression, I have to put up with a pretty insane work schedule (usually only 3-5 days per week, but with 10-12+ hours each shift and of course my job involves constant standing and walking for the entierty of my shift.), along with going back to school in a couple months, and verbally & emotionally abusive parents, but have a snowball's chance in hell of them ever getting held accountable for their actions.  Also I am considering getting an apartment so that I will not have to put up with the Bi**chmobiles (aka parents) anymore, but of course that is a logistical nightmare.

So yeah, just a few difficulties there.

Edited by Wizardwarrior315
Trying to post coherently at 3am
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My heart goes out to you!  What enormously stressful conditions you are living under!  It is just incredible what you face each day!!!

The coping skills I learned come from cognitive therapy.  If you already know about this, please skip the rest of my post.  

Most types of therapy aim at helping someone change their situation in order to regain peace and joy of living.  Cognitive therapy is sort of different.  It primarily aims at helping people feel good no matter how bad things are, but it requires "fighting" the moods that make people miserable.  So it isn't easy.

I guess the idea behind this is to change focus from one view to another.  The view that causes or contributes to so much misery is this:  "Things could be better, but they are not better."  That view generates real feelings and moods:  sadness, anger, resentment, anxiety, rage, guilt, shame, frustration, fatigue, sadness and hopelessness."  And it is true that anything can be looked at that way.  Nothing is perfect.  Everything could be better.  Even a "perfect" diamond has microscopic flaws and could be better.

But the same things, according to cognitive therapy, can be looked at another way, a way that tends to engenders calmness and peace and feeling good.  That view is that things could be worse, but they are not worse, thank goodness!  I am sick right now but it could be worse.  I could have the ebola virus or the plague.  I could be suddenly stricken with blindness or deafness or total body paralysis, but I am not.  My health could be worse but it isn't worse, thank goodness.

Almost anything can be looked at in this way.  I can look at myself and think:  I could be better, but am not better.  I could be stronger, braver, smarter, better looking, more successful, a better person, but I  am not.  But I can also look at myself another way:  I could be worse, but I am not worse.  I could be weaker than I am but I am not weaker, thank goodness.  I could be less courageous, less intelligent, less wise, less attractive, less good, but I am not less, thank goodness.  One way of looking at things generates feelings and moods of dissatisfaction, frustration, aggravation, anger and sadness.  The other way generates feelings of peace and happiness.  One way helps one feel good no matter what is going on in life.

I could have worse parents than I do, worse friends, worse work, worse health, but I don't have worse, thank goodness!   Everyday planes crash, but it could be worse.  Everyday every plane could crash, but does not crash.  Almost weekly a student commits an act of unbelievable violence on a school campus.  But weekly a billion students go to school and do not do this thing.  

Cognitive therapy is about resisting, even fighting depressogenic feelings and moods.  Since these can run quite deep and can be ingrained and strong, it is a kind of fight.  But it is supposed to help antidepressant therapy work better because it attacks the very roots of stress.

One of the suggested insights of cognitive psychology came when the psychologists were studying basically happy people.  There were people, for example, living in a very poor conditions in Third World countries lacking some of the most basic things that many people take for granted.  Some were trapped in poverty and illness and yet they were joyful and peaceful people.  How could that be?  How could someone be basically happy in such circumstances?  I think what they found was that attitude had a lot to do with it and that attitude was something that could be modified although this often involved effort.  If I am not wrong, I think it was later learned that this seemed to help with antidepressant therapy too where the stress had caused organic pathology.

I know I have signs posted everywhere I tend to be that read:  "Things could be worse, but they are not worse, thank goodness!"  I carry a card in my pocket with those words written on it.  In my case, it has helped me and helped my medication therapy work better.

Of course, people are different and what works for one of us might not work for someone else so my case cannot be generalized.  It does not necessarily apply to others.  It will not necessarily work for others.  It can never be "advice."  I am just sharing what has helped me.  When I was first introduced to cognitive psychology it was presented to me like this.  The doctor said:  "Here is a therapy that has helped some people.  Would you like to see if it helps you?"  It was presented to me as a sort of trial as perhaps some medication might be tried.

You are under very stressful conditions to put it mildly.  I am not sure I could endure what you are enduring.  I was hospitalized for depression once when I was under conditions less stressful than the ones you cope with, so I think you are a very strong person.  When I say that "my heart goes to you," I mean just that:  "My heart goes out to you!!!"  

PS:  If you are interested, there is a short YouTube video of one of the founders of Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Aaron T. Beck discussing what I wrote of above.  It is called "Life Wisdom from Dr. Aaron Beck" and is 3 minutes and 34 seconds long.

 

 

Edited by Epictetus
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On 4/6/2018 at 0:23 PM, Epictetus said:

My heart goes out to you!  What enormously stressful conditions you are living under!  It is just incredible what you face each day!!!

The coping skills I learned come from cognitive therapy.  If you already know about this, please skip the rest of my post.  

Most types of therapy aim at helping someone change their situation in order to regain peace and joy of living.  Cognitive therapy is sort of different.  It primarily aims at helping people feel good no matter how bad things are, but it requires "fighting" the moods that make people miserable.  So it isn't easy.

I guess the idea behind this is to change focus from one view to another.  The view that causes or contributes to so much misery is this:  "Things could be better, but they are not better."  That view generates real feelings and moods:  sadness, anger, resentment, anxiety, rage, guilt, shame, frustration, fatigue, sadness and hopelessness."  And it is true that anything can be looked at that way.  Nothing is perfect.  Everything could be better.  Even a "perfect" diamond has microscopic flaws and could be better.

But the same things, according to cognitive therapy, can be looked at another way, a way that tends to engenders calmness and peace and feeling good.  That view is that things could be worse, but they are not worse, thank goodness!  I am sick right now but it could be worse.  I could have the ebola virus or the plague.  I could be suddenly stricken with blindness or deafness or total body paralysis, but I am not.  My health could be worse but it isn't worse, thank goodness.

Almost anything can be looked at in this way.  I can look at myself and think:  I could be better, but am not better.  I could be stronger, braver, smarter, better looking, more successful, a better person, but I  am not.  But I can also look at myself another way:  I could be worse, but I am not worse.  I could be weaker than I am but I am not weaker, thank goodness.  I could be less courageous, less intelligent, less wise, less attractive, less good, but I am not less, thank goodness.  One way of looking at things generates feelings and moods of dissatisfaction, frustration, aggravation, anger and sadness.  The other way generates feelings of peace and happiness.  One way helps one feel good no matter what is going on in life.

I could have worse parents than I do, worse friends, worse work, worse health, but I don't have worse, thank goodness!   Everyday planes crash, but it could be worse.  Everyday every plane could crash, but does not crash.  Almost weekly a student commits an act of unbelievable violence on a school campus.  But weekly a billion students go to school and do not do this thing.  

Cognitive therapy is about resisting, even fighting depressogenic feelings and moods.  Since these can run quite deep and can be ingrained and strong, it is a kind of fight.  But it is supposed to help antidepressant therapy work better because it attacks the very roots of stress.

One of the suggested insights of cognitive psychology came when the psychologists were studying basically happy people.  There were people, for example, living in a very poor conditions in Third World countries lacking some of the most basic things that many people take for granted.  Some were trapped in poverty and illness and yet they were joyful and peaceful people.  How could that be?  How could someone be basically happy in such circumstances?  I think what they found was that attitude had a lot to do with it and that attitude was something that could be modified although this often involved effort.  If I am not wrong, I think it was later learned that this seemed to help with antidepressant therapy too where the stress had caused organic pathology.

I know I have signs posted everywhere I tend to be that read:  "Things could be worse, but they are not worse, thank goodness!"  I carry a card in my pocket with those words written on it.  In my case, it has helped me and helped my medication therapy work better.

Of course, people are different and what works for one of us might not work for someone else so my case cannot be generalized.  It does not necessarily apply to others.  It will not necessarily work for others.  It can never be "advice."  I am just sharing what has helped me.  When I was first introduced to cognitive psychology it was presented to me like this.  The doctor said:  "Here is a therapy that has helped some people.  Would you like to see if it helps you?"  It was presented to me as a sort of trial as perhaps some medication might be tried.

You are under very stressful conditions to put it mildly.  I am not sure I could endure what you are enduring.  I was hospitalized for depression once when I was under conditions less stressful than the ones you cope with, so I think you are a very strong person.  When I say that "my heart goes to you," I mean just that:  "My heart goes out to you!!!"  

PS:  If you are interested, there is a short YouTube video of one of the founders of Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Aaron T. Beck discussing what I wrote of above.  It is called "Life Wisdom from Dr. Aaron Beck" and is 3 minutes and 34 seconds long.

 

 

Thank you.  Honestly, I've already tried that, with some (althogh limited) success.  The problem lies in that my parents being verbally abusive is not ok, and not something I can just sweep under the rug.  Yes, I understand that my parents have their own mental health issues that they are trying to manage.  Yes, I understand that parents can be very annoying.  But what they are doing crosses a line, and they aren't even trying to moderate their actions.  It would appear that nothing short of a lawsuit will get through to them at this point, which is very unfortunate.  

Once again Epicetetus, thanks for your kind words.  As for how I manage this situation, I guess you could say that I am 'stress hardened'.  I have had 10+ stressful life events happen within the past 3 years, and that has taken a toll on many areas of my life.  However, if there is one good thing that comes from that, it would be that it has raised my stress tolerance from "intense" to "triple insanity".  

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