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Depression and Work/Career


How Has Depression Impacted Your Work Life and Career?  

82 members have voted

  1. 1. Has Depression had a substantial negative impact on your ability to work, and to progress in your career?

    • Yes, depression has had a major impact on my ability to be effective at work and keep a job or advance.
      74
    • No, depression has had only a minor impact, if any on my career and worklife.
      5
    • Other;explain
      4


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Sir Robin- you need a different job and maybe a new line of work altogether. Customer dumbness is one thing that does not change, ever. The key is, at least in my experience, to find a job where the amount of dumbness from customers and co-workers is tolerable to you personally. Not an easy task, for sure.

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On 7/1/2017 at 0:55 PM, Misanthrop said:

Can I ask the help of fellow DFers:

Let's list the least stressful, challenging jobs

Because I believe that it is the stress we have to deal with in order to be paid that drives us to depression & possibly even suicide.

That is part of it for me, and the dichotomous thinking (perfectionism, black/white, etc.), and i'm close to it now.

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20 hours ago, uncertain1 said:

I'd like to hear responses on jobs as well. I agree that our careers can be responsible for depression and anxiety. A job you thrive at may be one that I can't handle emotionally (duh). I haven't found satisfactory answers when I've done searches for low stress jobs. Having more autonomy in what, when, and how you work seems to be one factor. Some careers essentially have a never-ending amount of work - even if you work 60 hours / week, there's always more you could do. So you may feel you never really have a chance to relax (without feeling guilty). 

I daydream about working part-time for a small quirky shop near me. It's never busy, lots of friendly repeat customers, and generally a laid-back vibe.  

  

I've gone through the same research too, only to find I"m unable to identify, much less secure, something that would work for me.  I haven't ever fully given up on it, but feel like its pretty futile most of the time.

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On ‎01‎/‎07‎/‎2017 at 9:35 PM, uncertain1 said:

I'd like to hear responses on jobs as well. I agree that our careers can be responsible for depression and anxiety. A job you thrive at may be one that I can't handle emotionally (duh). I haven't found satisfactory answers when I've done searches for low stress jobs. Having more autonomy in what, when, and how you work seems to be one factor. Some careers essentially have a never-ending amount of work - even if you work 60 hours / week, there's always more you could do. So you may feel you never really have a chance to relax (without feeling guilty). 

I daydream about working part-time for a small quirky shop near me. It's never busy, lots of friendly repeat customers, and generally a laid-back vibe.  

  

I do not think you can always categorise jobs into high and low stress jobs.  Many people leave what they regard as high stress jobs to do something they think will be less stressful only to find that the stress of the new job is not less but different.  You get examples of senior professionals who retire early and take jobs such as van drivers only to find that they like driving a van but they do not like being treated like a van driver during the course of their work.  They have found themselves being shouted and cursed at by other drivers, told where and when they can park and basically treated badly by the general public. 

There is one exception perhaps.  If you  you leave a stressful job to do a job which involves a special talent you have, then that job can be less stressful than many jobs.  I know this guy who became a street busker when his IT company went out of business.  He is a very talented musician and at one time was a semi-professional musician.  He has been busking for quite a while now and he told me that he is very happy doing it and makes a fair living out of it. 

Edited by Mistral001
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7 hours ago, Mistral001 said:

I do not think you can always categorise jobs into high and low stress jobs.  Many people leave what they regard as high stress jobs to do something they think will be less stressful only to find that the stress of the new job is not less but different.  You get examples of senior professionals who retire early and take jobs such as van drivers only to find that they like driving a van but they do not like being treated like a van driver during the course of their work.  They have found themselves being shouted and cursed at by other drivers, told where and when they can park and basically treated badly by the general public. 

There is one exception perhaps.  If you  you leave a stressful job to do a job which involves a special talent you have, then that job can be less stressful than many jobs.  I know this guy who became a street busker when his IT company went out of business.  He is a very talented musician and at one time was a semi-professional musician.  He has been busking for quite a while now and he told me that he is very happy doing it and makes a fair living out of it. 

Agreed 100%. Oftentimes, being good at what you do and liking it will remove alot of the stress. My current job is the only one I have ever had in which I am actually really good at it and like it. That by itself removes alot of stress since I don't have to worry so much about whether I can actually get my tasks done and whether I'll be bored to death doing something I don't care about.

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7 hours ago, Mistral001 said:

I do not think you can always categorise jobs into high and low stress jobs.  Many people leave what they regard as high stress jobs to do something they think will be less stressful only to find that the stress of the new job is not less but different.  You get examples of senior professionals who retire early and take jobs such as van drivers only to find that they like driving a van but they do not like being treated like a van driver during the course of their work.  They have found themselves being shouted and cursed at by other drivers, told where and when they can park and basically treated badly by the general public. 

There is one exception perhaps.  If you  you leave a stressful job to do a job which involves a special talent you have, then that job can be less stressful than many jobs.  I know this guy who became a street busker when his IT company went out of business.  He is a very talented musician and at one time was a semi-professional musician.  He has been busking for quite a while now and he told me that he is very happy doing it and makes a fair living out of it. 

You raise a good point that it can be VERY difficult to predict/figure out whether some new job will actually be less stressful.  Also, as a general proposition, even if one will be less stressful in time, there usually is stress involved in learning new things, especially on the job, and perhaps more so as we age and for those of us with depression.

I have found for myself that autonomy and control lead to greater satisfaction and even happiness, while not necessarily a net reduction in stress, a result of a more complicated set of factors.

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Agreed 100%. I find that I need a happy medium between autonomy and structure. I have had jobs that were micromanaged to death, I have also had jobs that were straight up productivity based sink or swim. I can't do either one. I can do pretty well when I am straight salaried or hourly and my employer trusts me to get my work done without dumbing it down.

Everybody at my work I have talked to agrees that me getting the promotion is a given, except of course the people who will actually make that decision. Trouble is, they said that last time also. I am most certainly not counting on anything as I said earlier. I'll put in my quarter, pull the handle on the slot machine, and accept whatever the dials stop at.

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I moved to a new state and had so much anxiety, I couldn't work.  I quit several jobs because I didn't want to be here.  Now I have accepted being here, I cannot find a job! Now this is making me seriously depressed.  I have gone on so many interviews and either over-qualified or under-qualifed.  I don't know what to do anymore.  I'm at the end of my rope.  I keep trying to stay positive, nothing is working.  I don't know what to do anymore and it's starting to scare me. I've completely ruined my career and my awesome work history and now no one will hire me.

Edited by squeakels
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Great topic. Great posts. Here is my two cents. I installed carpet and tile for a decade. Army for three, maybe three years retail, five year sales, and last october i took a chef job at a football stadium. Some places i made a lot, and some not. I was always successful, everywhere i went people loved me. A top producer. For me, the main problem with work are people. People suck d**k. They prove to me everyday that we do not need to exist. If anyone finds a job where you do not enventually want to blow your brains out, pm me that. 

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21 hours ago, squeakels said:

I moved to a new state and had so much anxiety, I couldn't work.  I quit several jobs because I didn't want to be here.  Now I have accepted being here, I cannot find a job! Now this is making me seriously depressed.  I have gone on so many interviews and either over-qualified or under-qualifed.  I don't know what to do anymore.  I'm at the end of my rope.  I keep trying to stay positive, nothing is working.  I don't know what to do anymore and it's starting to scare me. I've completely ruined my career and my awesome work history and now no one will hire me.

I can relate.  I moved from the Midwest to a big east coast city 6 years ago, meanwhile, things have gotten more competitive with technology.

Your statement above, however, sounds like an over-generalization.  Ok, part of the reason I'm saying that is that I am presently returning to work through CBT myself. But still, if you had a great work history, by no means is it ruined by a move to a new city and an appreciable amount of time finding the right next job.  I was a recruiter - that most certainly is a reason that all employers can understand.  It may just take time.  It sounds like you have a lot to offer.  Don't sell yourself short.

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10 hours ago, glfinding said:

Great topic. Great posts. Here is my two cents. I installed carpet and tile for a decade. Army for three, maybe three years retail, five year sales, and last october i took a chef job at a football stadium. Some places i made a lot, and some not. I was always successful, everywhere i went people loved me. A top producer. For me, the main problem with work are people. People suck d**k. They prove to me everyday that we do not need to exist. If anyone finds a job where you do not enventually want to blow your brains out, pm me that. 

"People suck d**k"

Ok that made me laugh.

I think we can all appreciate that sentiment.  Try to remember that without people and our problems, there would be no jobs or need for them.

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I'm posting an email that my family was just circulating and commenting on with the subject: The future change in almost every facet of our life.
We've all seen these.
Our last generation of political leaders said things like, "a rising tide lifts all boats," and "when we all do better, we all do better."  That obviously is not the main direction we have headed. But these changes are the main reason I think our entire economic system is long overdue for a fundamental change...and it seems that here and there...others are starting to voice this as well.  Including Tech Billionaires like Nick Hanauer, Elon Musk, Mark Zukerberg, and others.  That doesn't mean it will happen, but I think either by sheer weight of numbers of fear of revolution, it should and hope it will.  I have to remind myself not to overgeneralize or be overly pessimistic about this, which of course is natural and easy for me to do.

 

 

    In 1998 Kodak had 170,000 employees and sold 85% of all photo paper worldwide.

 

Within just a few years, their business model disappeared and they went bankrupt.

 

What happened to Kodak will happen in a lot of industries in the next 5-10 years and, most people won't see it coming. 

 

Did you think in 1998 that 3 years later you would never take pictures on film again?

 

Yet digital cameras were invented in 1975. The first ones only had 10,000 pixels, but followed Moore 's law.

 

 So as with all exponential technologies, it was a disappointment for a time, before it became way superior and became mainstream in only a few short years.

 

Wx It will now happen again (but much faster) with Artificial Intelligence, health, autonomous and electric cars, education, 3D printing, agriculture and jobs.

 

Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution. Welcome to the Exponential Age. 

 

2.  Software will disrupt most traditional industries in the next 5-10 years.

 

3.  Uber is just a software tool, they don't own any cars, and are now the biggest taxi company in the world.

 

4.  Airbnb is now the biggest hotel company in the world, although they don't own any properties.

 

5.  Artificial Intelligence: Computers become exponentially better in understanding the world This year, a computer beat the best Go-player in the world, 10 years earlier than expected.

 

6.  In the US , young lawyers already don't get jobs. Because of IBM's Watson, you can get legal advice (so far for more or less basic stuff) within seconds, with 90% accuracy compared with 70% accuracy when done by humans.

 

So if you study law, stop immediately. There will be 90% less lawyers in the future, only omniscient specialists  will remain.

 

6A.  Watson already helps nurses diagnosing cancer, its 4 times more accurate than human nurses.

 

7.  Facebook now has a pattern recognition software that can recognize faces better than humans. In 2030, computers will become more intelligent than humans.

 

8.  Autonomous cars : In 2018 the first self driving cars will appear for the public. Around 2020, the complete industry will start to be disrupted. You don't want to own a car anymore. You will call a car with your phone, it will show up at your location and drive you to your destination. You will not need to park it, you only pay for the driven distance and can be productive while driving.

 

The very young children of today will never get a driver's licence and will never own a car.

 

8A.  It will change the cities, because we will need 90-95% less cars for that.   We can transform former parking spaces into parks.

 

1.2 million people die each year in car accidents worldwide. We now have one accident every 60,000 mi (100,000 km), with autonomous driving that will drop to 1 accident in 6 million mi (10 million km).  That will save a million lives world wide each year.

 

8B.  Most car companies will doubtless become bankrupt. Traditional car companies try the evolutionary approach and just build a better car, while tech companies (Tesla, Apple, Google) will do the revolutionary approach and build a computer on wheels.

 

8C.  Many engineers from Volkswagen and Audi; are completely terrified of Tesla.

 

9.  Insurance companies will have massive trouble because, without accidents, the insurance will become 100x cheaper. Their car insurance business model will disappear.

 

10.  Real estate will change. Because if you can work while you commute, people will move further away to live in a more beautiful neighbourhood.

 

11.  Electric cars will become mainstream about 2020.  Cities will be less noisy because all new cars will run on electricity.

 

12.  Electricity will become incredibly cheap and clean: Solar production has been on an exponential curve for 30 years, but you can now see the burgeoning impact.

 

13.  Last year, more solar energy was installed worldwide than fossil. Energy companies are desperately trying to limit access to the grid to prevent competition from home solar installations, but that simply cannot continue - technology will take care of that strategy.

 

14.  With cheap electricity comes cheap and abundant water. Desalination of salt water now only needs 2kWh per cubic meter (@ 0.25 cents). We don't have scarce water in most places, we only have scarce drinking water. Imagine what will be possible if anyone can have as much clean water as he wants, for nearly no cost.

 

15.  Health: The Tricorder X price will be announced this year. There are companies who will build a medical device (called the "Tricorder" from Star Trek) that works with your phone, which takes your retina scan, your blood sample and you breath into it.

 

16.  It then analyses 54 bio-markers that will identify nearly any disease.  It will be cheap, so in a few years everyone on this planet will have access to world class medical analysis, nearly for free.  Goodbye, self-serving medical practitioners and establishments.

 

17.  3D printing: The price of the cheapest 3D printer came down from $18,000 to $400 within 10 years. In the same time, it became 100 times faster. All major shoe companies have already started 3D printing shoes.

18.  Some spare airplane parts are already 3D printed in remote airports. The space station now has a printer that eliminates the need for the large amount of spare parts they used to have in the past.

 

19.  At the end of this year, new smart phones will have 3D scanning possibilities. You can then 3D scan your feet and print your perfect shoe at home.

 

 

I'll add that fast food restaurants have begun to become automated with no more people taking orders.  This is enormously significant in its impact on the workforce.

At the law firm where I'm working, I was sitting in a 1 month review a couple weeks ago, talking about some of the document management software (which I used to sell at Lexis).  I asked or said, 'it seems to me that pretty soon you could have a good algorithm designed to pull information from the digital medical records' and make it almost a fully automated system.  The two supervisors kind of looked at the ground for a minute and said, 'yah, we already do this for a few hundred a week.
This was complete sci-fi fantasy when I went to law school.  You could imagine it, but it didn't actually exist.
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@gandolfication

I work at an indoor pool (a YMCA) and I don't know if depression has deepened my sense of empathy or not, I've always been someone who is considered caring and patient with people. It could be because I fell into depression right after getting to be a little older than just a child. I really never thought of that idea that other people are easier to empathize with.

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3 minutes ago, RobinandBlondie said:

@gandolfication

I work at an indoor pool (a YMCA) and I don't know if depression has deepened my sense of empathy or not, I've always been someone who is considered caring and patient with people. It could be because I fell into depression right after getting to be a little older than just a child. I really never thought of that idea that other people are easier to empathize with.

I think having experienced depression for most people does allow them to better understand pain and suffering in others because it forces them to understand it better in general, including in themselves, if that makes sense.  One distinction:  that doesn't necessarily mean that someone suffering with depression 'treats' others better.  In fact, there is sometimes a cruel paradox that a person suffering from depression can often treat people worse.  The ravages of fear and anger, etc. can do this.

Still, it has been my experience, in general that people who have suffered severe/clinical depression at least have an attitude of wanting to help others when they can, and that is perhaps especially true for others suffering with depression (which is probably intuitive).  

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@gandolfication

That is really interesting, it makes me think about things a lot more. Thank you for putting that into perspective, I think I would've been too dumb to think of something like that. I thought that I was stupid for the contradiction in work, but now I feel a little better knowing I'm not completely crazy.

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10 minutes ago, RobinandBlondie said:

@gandolfication

That is really interesting, it makes me think about things a lot more. Thank you for putting that into perspective, I think I would've been too dumb to think of something like that. I thought that I was stupid for the contradiction in work, but now I feel a little better knowing I'm not completely crazy.

@RobinandBlondie,

I can't imagine what about that would make you say and think that you're somehow unintelligent.  Except that 99.9% of the rest of us hear feel the same feelings of inadequacy.  It is one of the most defining characteristics of this condition/disease.  
Happily, there a lot of people here who have been dealing with this for a long time, and reading and treating with learned professionals and sharing experience, strength and hope.  You're one of them.

I don't know (and possibly don't remember - because my recall ability has really struggled) your story.  But nothing about it so far suggests a whiff of lack of any intelligence.  Just depression.  I just wanted to say that.

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2 hours ago, gandolfication said:

I'm posting an email that my family was just circulating and commenting on with the subject: The future change in almost every facet of our life.
We've all seen these.
Our last generation of political leaders said things like, "a rising tide lifts all boats," and "when we all do better, we all do better."  That obviously is not the main direction we have headed. But these changes are the main reason I think our entire economic system is long overdue for a fundamental change...and it seems that here and there...others are starting to voice this as well.  Including Tech Billionaires like Nick Hanauer, Elon Musk, Mark Zukerberg, and others.  That doesn't mean it will happen, but I think either by sheer weight of numbers of fear of revolution, it should and hope it will.  I have to remind myself not to overgeneralize or be overly pessimistic about this, which of course is natural and easy for me to do

 

    In 1998 Kodak had 170,000 employees and sold 85% of all photo paper worldwide.............

 

...........on the workforce.

At the law firm where I'm working, I was sitting in a 1 month review a couple weeks ago, talking about some of the document management software (which I used to sell at Lexis).  I asked or said, 'it seems to me that pretty soon you could have a good algorithm designed to pull information from the digital medical records' and make it almost a fully automated system.  The two supervisors kind of looked at the ground for a minute and said, 'yah, we already do this for a few hundred a week.
This was complete sci-fi fantasy when I went to law school.  You could imagine it, but it didn't actually exist.

My own view is that while we have to keep up to date in our chosen  professions, we should not lose faith in our basic core knowledge that we learned from our education and training.  

I do many calculations in my work as a chartered engineer.  I was trained to do my calculations by hand on squared-lined headed paper.  A few years ago, I noticed that many of the calculations done by other firms were done on computer and the printouts looked very neat.  I have been using computers for years and have always done some of the more time-consuming calculations using computers, but the basic everyday calcs were always done my hand.  BTW with most of these calculations copies are sent to my clients and the local authorities for checking or their records

When work slackened about three years ago, I decided that I would use the extra time I had on my hands to set up a system to do  all my calculations by computer.  When work picked up and I stopped doing hand calculations, I found that the process of doing the calculations on computer and printing them out took more time than doing them by hand and I was more prone to make errors. 

I am now back doing my calcualtions by hand.  I am saving time and doing things in a more intuitive way as well as being more creative since I can quickly do sketches in the calculation sheets which take an age to do by computer.  I have mentioned this to a few other engineers and they have told me that they still do all their calcs by hand.

I look upon my dalliance  with an all-computer calculation writing as just a lack of confidence in my own abilities and my gullibility at being too easily impressed by appearances.

Edited by Mistral001
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1 hour ago, Mistral001 said:

My own view is that while we have to keep up to date in our chosen  professions, we should not lose faith in our basic core knowledge that we learned from our education and training.  

I do many calculations in my work as a chartered engineer.  I was trained to do my calculations by hand on squared-lined headed paper.  A few years ago, I noticed that many of the calculations done by other firms were done on computer and the printouts looked very neat.  I have been using computers for years and have always done some of the more time-consuming calculations using computers, but the basic everyday calcs were always done my hand.  BTW with most of these calculations copies are sent to my clients and the local authorities for checking or their records

When work slackened about three years ago, I decided that I would use the extra time I had on my hands to set up a system to do  all my calculations by computer.  When work picked up and I stopped doing hand calculations, I found that the process of doing the calculations on computer and printing them out took more time than doing them by hand and I was more prone to make errors. 

I am now back doing my calcualtions by hand.  I am saving time and doing things in a more intuitive way as well as being more creative since I can quickly do sketches in the calculation sheets which take an age to do by computer.  I have mentioned this to a few other engineers and they have told me that they still do all their calcs by hand.

I look upon my dalliance  with an all-computer calculation writing as just a lack of confidence in my own abilities and my gullibility at being too easily impressed by appearances.

That's cool, and maybe is somewhat specific to the place where you're at as an engineer right now.

10 years ago I would have been able to say something very similar about writing legal briefs.  (I came along as something of a hybrid, being born and coming of age at a crossroads -- I was as comfortable creating original work product on a laptop as I was by hand since the beginning of law school).  To be sure, the snippet about Watson providing legal advice "about basic stuff" with greater accuracy and speed is nothing like the work I used to do in complex commercial litigation (and frankly, many legal problems that seem simple at first often don't turn out to be - I bet that Watson program--while amazing and frightening enough also makes some mistakes of a nature that would leave a first-day law student agog).  But everyone says this.  Until it they look around and it has changed.  Most of it is a series of decisions.  10 years ago very few of these decisions or judgments could be made well at all by any computer.  Today that is not the case.

Surely there are engineers coming out now and some if not most will be used to leveraging a computer to make exponentially more calculations, and faster, and because they will at some point have been trained almost natively to do them on a computer, they will not be prone to making more errors versus doing them by hand.  This is the relevant comparison their firms and clients will make in hiring them.  Many in my family would bristle at me saying this (as I do with the legal AI engines).  Same with accounting.  But it is happening.  Computers are writing a significant percentage of news stories now without visibility to us.

And they are programming other computers.

So yes, keep skills up to date. But I think a lot of people have been displaced and feel adrift as in the precisely those skills they were trained in were are no longer valued.  If someone would have told me 10 years ago I'd be writing administrative appeals for $14/hour, I would have thought they were crazy, and I could see this coming in general.  But now I've lived through the first wave or two and see it differently.

 

Edited by gandolfication
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Perhaps of interest: YouTube "Capitalism 2.0 Will Include a Healthy Dose of Socialism | Eric Weinstein" by BigThink.(don't let the title dissuade you)

The connection between depression and empathy is interesting. When I was younger I (too frequently) thought that I knew the better way to do something (better than management for example). I would get irritated at other drivers. My views have softened (mostly). Now that slow driver in front of me may be lost trying to find their way to a doctor's office or is exhausted from working too long... (should this become a new thread?)    

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34 minutes ago, uncertain1 said:

Perhaps of interest: YouTube "Capitalism 2.0 Will Include a Healthy Dose of Socialism | Eric Weinstein" by BigThink.(don't let the title dissuade you)

The connection between depression and empathy is interesting. When I was younger I (too frequently) thought that I knew the better way to do something (better than management for example). I would get irritated at other drivers. My views have softened (mostly). Now that slow driver in front of me may be lost trying to find their way to a doctor's office or is exhausted from working too long... (should this become a new thread?)    

That does sound of interest to me; and something I can listen to while writing appeals.  :)  I don't think socialism is a bad word, but understand the comment as that's not the norm in the U.S.

Those thoughts about drivers are very useful; I will try to remember them.

I can relate to thinking I had a better way of doing things.  I still get tired of monotony and overly paternalistic rules and think that creativity is sometimes stifled. But as some managers have reminded me - if  you have a way that is proven to work better, go for it.  Otherwise, follow the rules and guidelines.  

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37 minutes ago, uncertain1 said:

Perhaps of interest: YouTube "Capitalism 2.0 Will Include a Healthy Dose of Socialism | Eric Weinstein" by BigThink.(don't let the title dissuade you)

The connection between depression and empathy is interesting. When I was younger I (too frequently) thought that I knew the better way to do something (better than management for example). I would get irritated at other drivers. My views have softened (mostly). Now that slow driver in front of me may be lost trying to find their way to a doctor's office or is exhausted from working too long... (should this become a new thread?)    

Feel free to start a new thread (or not).  It's an interesting topic.

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One bit of advice I will throw out there. Being passed up for a job because you are "overqualified" is very real. Last time I was looking to change jobs, all of a sudden I started getting offers of employment as soon as I took my M.A. off the application and just listed my B.A. Unless your education is actually relevant to a particular job I would not tell them about anything more than the average person in that position would have. Unless they know you personally and/or you list all your education on sites such as Linked In and Facebook they aren't going to find out. You should also advise your references not to talk about your education, they should say something like "I never saw his/her education degrees in person so I don't feel comfortable talking about that."

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42 minutes ago, Afterglow1978 said:

One bit of advice I will throw out there. Being passed up for a job because you are "overqualified" is very real. Last time I was looking to change jobs, all of a sudden I started getting offers of employment as soon as I took my M.A. off the application and just listed my B.A. Unless your education is actually relevant to a particular job I would not tell them about anything more than the average person in that position would have. Unless they know you personally and/or you list all your education on sites such as Linked In and Facebook they aren't going to find out. You should also advise your references not to talk about your education, they should say something like "I never saw his/her education degrees in person so I don't feel comfortable talking about that."

This might seem startling or unfair by many, but it is simply the employer finding who they think of as a suitable person for the job.  Employers look at how someone will fit in to their organisation.  Also, they get nervous about whether an over-qualified person will stay with them for long.    

I would caution against actually hiding your qualifications though if you are in certain professions.  In some cases people with certain qualifications are not permitted to take a job which require a lesser qualification than they have.  I think this happens in the medical and teaching professions in many countries, where say a qualified doctor cannot be employed as a nurse or a qualified teacher cannot be employed as a teaching assistant. 

 

Edited by Mistral001
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Sorry, I've been absent from this thread for awhile. Nothing has changed in my situation; I'm still completely overwhelmed at work and I am thoroughly sick of it. I have this ongoing "fear" that the people who I supervise are far more intelligent than I am. That is not a baseless fear. As a manager, I'm supposed to evaluate proposals from employees and decide which course to take. Problem is, I can see many sides of an issue and it's almost impossible for me to make a decision. And then there's the ever-looming spectre of making the "wrong" decision. I generally end up gridlocked and not able to decide. No matter what I do, I'll get called into the boss's office to be grilled.

Anyhoo...music while working. I found a few "alpha wave" and "binaural beat" videos on Youtube that seem to help my concentration. These last for hours and easily become a soothing background sound. I'd provide links but we ain't supposed to do that on these forums (plural of forum is fora? :) ).

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JD:

It sounds like you have found good music to help with concentration.  Well done.  

There is a classical composer named Max Richter who has a series of compositions on an album called "Sleep."  It is soothing for me.  It doesn't put me to sleep.  It helps me concentrate. 

My hope for you is that you'd see that your ability to see several sides of a problem is a strength.  I can imagine that often you feel overwhelmed trying ot make the "right" decision.  But often, in reality, there isn't a "right" decision.  

Have you worked out like four or five "evaluation" questions that would help you address the decision?

What is the net consequence?

What is most likely to work given the present realities?

What disappointment or downside will do the least harm?

Questions like that....

Best to you, 

 

Tim 

 

 

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