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gandolfication

Depression and Work/Career

How Has Depression Impacted Your Work Life and Career?  

82 members have voted

  1. 1. Has Depression had a substantial negative impact on your ability to work, and to progress in your career?

    • Yes, depression has had a major impact on my ability to be effective at work and keep a job or advance.
      74
    • No, depression has had only a minor impact, if any on my career and worklife.
      5
    • Other;explain
      4


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Depression has affected my work to a greater of lesser extent over the last 15-20 years.  It affects my efficiency mostly.  I cannot let the quality of my work output be affected by my depression, otherwise that will bring a lot of problems for me and frankly make me more depressed.   Thus  the speed of getting things done reduces.  I have to check my work output more rigorously than I used to before I became depressed.  Also, I have to refuse taking on the more challenging projects.    

Even in my everyday life, outside of work, my depression means that it takes longer to do things than it used to do.  Housework, gardening, car maintenance or even just organising a trip or holiday takes longer.  Accepting this, rather than pushing against it, I think, has helped me.  

The option of just not doing something because I cannot do it the way I used to do it I am pretty sure would lead to more severe depression.  

 

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This is just the thread I've been looking for. I need to Biotch about my job. 

I work as a phone sales rep for a travel insurance company. This is not exactly an ideal job for an introverted person like myself; at the same time however when I'm in one of my "better moods" I can charm the pants off of anyone I come into contact with. However those moods are getting fewer and farther between.

There are several reasons this job is a bad fit for me. The first is that I don't like being interrupted when I'm thinking or reading something. My blood pressure rises whenever I'm reading an email or doing some other task and then there's that damned BEEP in my ear and now I have to drop whatever I was doing or thinking to take the stupid call. It gets really irritating when an email comes in that I need to read or take action on but it sits there and sits there because I have to keep taking call after call after call after call after call. And no I can't just "multi-task" because literally EVERYTHING we do on a call is recorded, from the phone conversation to what you are doing on the computer at the time, and I have heard several people say that they have gotten in trouble because a call was reviewed where they read or even just opened an email during the call. I'm surprised they haven't put up cameras to make sure people don't play on their cell phones at their desks. (Course if they did a lot of the supervisors would get in trouble too, I know because I have SEEN IT.)

The second is I am a rather sensitive person and I do NOT like when people are terse or angry with me, especially when it's for something that is not my fault in any way. Today some old woman was crabbing at ME because she had to wait on hold for half an hour before her call got through (because you know that the shlubs like me answering the phones have total control over that.) I got to a point where I quite literally wanted to tell her, "Lady, the world would be a better place if you just went out and jumped in front of a bus." Now of course that's a terrible thing to say but when you deal with garbage like this for nine hours a day you won't be the nicest person on the block either. I am so tired of dealing with people. 

Another problem with being a sensitive person is that it's easy to get overwhelmed and overstressed when we get busy because the calls DO. NOT. STOP. I have had days at this job where it has literally been eight straight hours of calls with no downtime between except for the five-second pause we get between calls. There have been times (like today) where I have been to the point of tears because I just want it all to STOP for a minute so I can catch my breath. I can always put myself into "work" mode for a minute but whenever you do that you put yourself at risk because if you are not in "available" or "ready" mode for too long during the day you can get in trouble for that too. 

The third is that (on a similar note) I don't like confrontation but it seems like every single day I have to argue with people who seem to think that if they pi** and moan enough they can get what they want. If you go to a car dealer looking for a car that has only three wheels, arguing with the salesperson is not going to change the fact that no such product exists; but for some reason people think if they say, "But that's what I WANT" enough times somehow magically they will be able to buy a three-wheeled car. 

Another thing is that I get tired of answering the same questions over and over and over and over and over again. In fact there are times when I have answered the same question five or six times in the same call. Sometimes I just want to scream at people and say, "I TOLD you that already! Take your thumb out of your ear and put it back in your butt!"

It also doesn't help that people get so nitpicky over things. It's important to understand what it is you're buying, yes. One thing I have learned from this job and another similar job I had is that I have very little sympathy for people who buy something without asking questions, just assuming that it will do what they think it does. (And what happens when we "ASSUME," kids?!) Many many times I have people call up and think that just because they bought insurance for their trip or their flight, they can get their money back if they just decide not to go. No insurance company that did that would stay in business very long. On the other end of the spectrum are the people who call up and say, "I want to know why this policy doesn't specifically state in writing that if I am in an Asian country at 4:16 p.m. Zulu time on the third Thursday of a month with the letter 'R' in it and I need an MRI because of a back spasm I suffer in my lower third quadrant that I am covered. I'm going to call my lawyer!"

I'm just so sick of it. I feel a little better now that I vented about it (plus I'm drinking a alcohol at the same time) but now it also feels like I went and got myself riled up for no reason just by dredging all this back up. I need to get away from here for a while. Maybe I'll go to a movie.

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On 6/2/2017 at 1:29 PM, Misanthrop said:

To fellow DFers of this thread: why is it that despite being medically depressed, you still go for getting a job instead of disability benefits? It's basically getting paid without facing wrath of difficult customers, or threats of termination by bosses

Is disability insufficient to support your family/household? Were you unable to prove beyond doubt that you're unable to earn a livable wage?

I'll start: as I've ever mentioned before, in my country welfare assistance only exist for physically illness e.g. complete loss of sight in one eye, complete loss of at least 2 limbs. Disability for mental illnesses does not exist in my country

I am currently on disability benefits. Sadly, the amount that SSI gives me isn't enough to live on, which I feel is unfortunate, because so many people are reduced to a life where they barely have anything simply because SSI gives the disabled so little. With the development of Rexulti and the approval to use it in addition to an antidepressant, I probably shouldn't even be on SSI anymore, so I am currently studying for the purpose of getting a specific job. I plan to get off SSI sometime next year. SSI limits my financial stability to just the bare minimum. It isn't how I want to live my entire life. I'm too young to spend my life on SSI.

To be honest, it's embarrassing that I have never had a job and I'm 25.

----

Response to the thread
In December 2012, I gave up on my depression ever getting better and applied for SSI benefits. I managed to successfully get them. I spent a good few years thinking I'd never be able to work simply because I kept developing so many issues. After being on Rexulti for a while, I decided I wanted to keep taking it and I doubt SSI will cover the costs of me having the medication, so this year, I decided to start a job-specific course, because I'm sick of being on a fixed income and I'm hoping that I've become mature enough to handle working. Unfortunately, I'm scared that I won't be able to keep the job after I've obtained it or that I won't find an available opening for the job position. My mother is paying for the course and I'm determined to get off SSI and start working. I just hope depression doesn't get in the way of me being able to work. It has certainly prevented me from thinking I can work in the past.

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I put in an application tonight for something new. If I get it I would have to move about an hour away, I guess it could be worse, but I absolutely loathe moving. At the same time, however, I absolutely loathe my job too, so I have to do something.

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6 hours ago, Afterglow1978 said:

You need a new line of work, plain and simple. The longer you stay in this the worse it's going to get.

What I didn't get into in my post above, but have posted about in my own threads, is that this type of work is so mentally draining for me that by the time I get done with work I have little energy left for anything else. When I have time off I want to deal with as little stress as possible so most of the time that means avoiding looking for anything new. Obviously this is a bad cycle because it's very difficult to make any progress without looking. Further I'm sure that part of it is that I fear change so much. Even if my current routine is terrible, it's routine and I know what to expect. "The devil you know..."

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5 hours ago, Sir Robin said:

 

 

On ‎04‎/‎06‎/‎2017 at 2:36 AM, Sir Robin said:

This is just the thread I've been looking for. I need to Biotch about my job. 

I work as a phone sales rep for a travel insurance company. This is not exactly an ideal job for an introverted person like myself; at the same time however when I'm in one of my "better moods" I can charm the pants off of anyone I come into contact with. However those moods are getting fewer and farther between.

Do you need to be charming in your job?  Perhaps you just need to be polite and distant with customers without the need to feel that you have to be charming or friendly with them.  

I am also fairly introverted and find that there is a pull for me to try to charm customers and engage with them almost on a personal level.  I can do it, but it can bring problems.  In fact it usually bring problems.  I accept that there are some people who can charm any customer no matter how difficult the customer is, but those people are rare.  

 

The problem I find is that it is difficult to be charming with everybody and there is a pull to be only charming with people I sense I would like personally.  That cause problems as the others get a very less tghan charming person.

Edited by Mistral001

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On ‎4‎/‎20‎/‎2017 at 6:12 PM, Cheddarhead said:

  I basically feel institutionalized because this is all I know.  

OMG.  Yes!!!  I always say that I feel like I'm in an abusive relationship.  I've worked at the same place for 27 years.  I didn't go to college/university so I don't have a degree to fall back on when finding a new job.  My bosses make me feel so dumb; they won't promote me because I don't have some piece of paper but then they'll ask me to train the person they hired who does.  So I'm good enough to train people but not good enough to promote?  It totally undermines my confidence.

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On ‎5‎/‎26‎/‎2017 at 10:09 AM, JD4010 said:

The concerted and sustained attack on social security is another example. This is a fund that is separate from other aspects of the federal budget, yet politicians, in response to wealthy powers, raid it and then loudly proclaim that it's bankrupt.

Not to mention them implying that anyone who draws on social security is a drain to the system.  Even though they paid into it their entire lives.

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Just now, gardengirlbc said:

Not to mention them implying that anyone who draws on social security is a drain to the system.  Even though they paid into it their entire lives.

And! They have Cadillac healthcare and retirement plans that WE pay for!

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3 minutes ago, gardengirlbc said:

OMG.  Yes!!!  I always say that I feel like I'm in an abusive relationship.  I've worked at the same place for 27 years.  I didn't go to college/university so I don't have a degree to fall back on when finding a new job.  My bosses make me feel so dumb; they won't promote me because I don't have some piece of paper but then they'll ask me to train the person they hired who does.  So I'm good enough to train people but not good enough to promote?  It totally undermines my confidence.

My outlook on the importance, need and value of formal education has changed drastically since I was younger.  I was a sufficiently nerdy (and ambitious) personality such that I came to like school quite a bit in college and law school...certainly more than almost any job I've had.  I graduated at the tops of my classes with a bunch of honors that seemed valuable and impressive at the time.  I don't devalue either my degrees or the experience I enjoyed while in school (especially college).  Indeed, I have tried to become a professor at various times.  Sure, my degrees helped me get jobs in sales and in law.

But that has diminished greatly over years (admittedly in part because I am not practicing law these days).  

More to the point, our higher ed system (I'll leave alone K-12 for now) is enormously inefficient and overpriced and is not agile or focused enough on employment marketability or competencies.

More flexible systems including on-line education, self-driven education, probably ideally with assistance, some mentorship, guidance, expanded aptitude and performance testing wherever possible, and probably many other things would be superior.  If I had to do over again, I would focus on a field and learn it, with peers, apprenticeships, intern/externships (I did do some of this).  I'd probably still complete some courses in college, but I don't know that I'd even care about getting an associate's degree, or I would get a current employer to pay for my education while working.  Some of this is a little sad and unfortunate because I do believe we NEED a people who are educated and well-rounded in their knowledge.  Some people can do this on their own.  Some cannot.

There are plenty of wealthy entrepreneur pundits out there who have long made the case that while having degrees is more important than ever in terms of even being considered for more and more jobs, in reality, it is often less and less important in practice, and also does not at all teach the kind of agility, risk-taking, technical skills, sales and other soft/interpersonal skills most needed in today's world.

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A degree can open doors at the start of your career.  Outside of the professions which absolutely require a degree employers often see people with a degree  as a person who has been educated and in many cases trained at someone else's expense.  They see you as a sort of bargain.  But a degree does not mean that you have to stop learning.  It  used to be like that, but  nowadays you have to keep on learning, training and keeping up to date just like anybody else in any other job.  

 

 

 

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21 minutes ago, Mistral001 said:

A degree can open doors at the start of your career.  Outside of the professions which absolutely require a degree employers often see people with a degree  as a person who has been educated and in many cases trained at someone else's expense.  They see you as a sort of bargain.  But a degree does not mean that you have to stop learning.  It  used to be like that, but  nowadays you have to keep on learning, training and keeping up to date just like anybody else in any other job.  

 

That's true.  A good point.  It's been that way for a while now.  

I would argue though, that the range of subjects one can continue learning nowadays that will help them earn income, has narrowed. Technology and global competition has sharply reduced or eliminated many of them.  Yes, there are hybrid versions that combine technology and other skills.  But, virtually all job growth projections right now are in tech, and in these fields and others people who remain competitively employed must somehow find a way to continue to accelerate the pace at which they produce more and higher quality work, in significant part because people more and more do compete with automation (as well as a surplus in cheap labor in the world). This cannot increase indefinitely.  I think that is a societal problem.

But also I have seen from the inside I suppose, that outside of the professions* the only category I can think of where people make a good living without formal education usually fall under the taxonomy of entrepreneurship, i.e. starting a business.  Not everyone should be running a business, and society certainly needs more than that.

Also, who stops learning?  I don't find that overly common.

*Interesting to note that the 'professions' have traditionally been defined as those requiring specialized educational training, to provide objective counsel and service to others, for a direct and definite compensation, wholly apart from expectation of other business gain.  They usually involve adherence to written ethical standards/canons and some authoritative licensing body.  I am by far most familiar with legal, (and then accounting), not as much with medicine or engineering.  It's interesting to note that as much as I think legal--like everything else--is enormously specialized, especially at the top and more profitable tiers.  In the past, people have been able to succeed as a lawyer without going to law school.  Lincoln is the prototypical example of a self-taught lawyer, but he was not such an outlier in his day.  Many people did this.  Makes me think of DiCaprio's character in Catch Me If You Can, who actually took the bar I think in FL without going to law school and it didn't appear he studied much.  I have no idea how a person could do that.  I do easily understand how very unusual focused, capable people could cram for the bar in a month or two and possibly pass it.  What I propose is something like people spend more like 3-6 months in a crash course and then transition into an apprenticeship of sorts which might vary, but they would complete or further their education by working.

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Sir Robin, if you took the new job would you not be able to go back and forth where you live now? I hate moving like death. I drive around an hour and 5 minutes each way and don't mind it at all. Besides, no guarantee a job is going to work out so I think it is wise to wait and see before you move.

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My boss interviewed for the other job today and said it went well. Apparently he and only one other person are interviewing for it so his chance should be at least 50%. 

I wish him all the success in the world but I'm seriously dreading the quandary I will find myself in if he gets it. Which, I detailed in a previous post but it just felt way more real watching my boss come in to the office in his best suit.

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17 hours ago, Mistral001 said:

 

Do you need to be charming in your job?  Perhaps you just need to be polite and distant with customers without the need to feel that you have to be charming or friendly with them.  

I am also fairly introverted and find that there is a pull for me to try to charm customers and engage with them almost on a personal level.  I can do it, but it can bring problems.  In fact it usually bring problems.  I accept that there are some people who can charm any customer no matter how difficult the customer is, but those people are rare.  

 

The problem I find is that it is difficult to be charming with everybody and there is a pull to be only charming with people I sense I would like personally.  That cause problems as the others get a very less tghan charming person.

Thanks for the advice, but we're pretty much required to be charming and engaging. Management calls it "establishing rapport." I call it "having a nice juicy lemon drop shoved up my butt and treating every single person I talk to every day like I've known them since third grade." It's not going to happen. :shifty3:

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2 hours ago, Afterglow1978 said:

Sir Robin, if you took the new job would you not be able to go back and forth where you live now? I hate moving like death. I drive around an hour and 5 minutes each way and don't mind it at all. Besides, no guarantee a job is going to work out so I think it is wise to wait and see before you move.

Thanks for the advice, but I don't like long commutes either. Besides, I could use a change of scenery.

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On 6/3/2017 at 9:36 PM, Sir Robin said:

This is just the thread I've been looking for. I need to Biotch about my job. 

I work as a phone sales rep for a travel insurance company. This is not exactly an ideal job for an introverted person like myself; at the same time however when I'm in one of my "better moods" I can charm the pants off of anyone I come into contact with. However those moods are getting fewer and farther between.

There are several reasons this job is a bad fit for me. The first is that I don't like being interrupted when I'm thinking or reading something. My blood pressure rises whenever I'm reading an email or doing some other task and then there's that damned BEEP in my ear and now I have to drop whatever I was doing or thinking to take the stupid call. It gets really irritating when an email comes in that I need to read or take action on but it sits there and sits there because I have to keep taking call after call after call after call after call. And no I can't just "multi-task" because literally EVERYTHING we do on a call is recorded, from the phone conversation to what you are doing on the computer at the time, and I have heard several people say that they have gotten in trouble because a call was reviewed where they read or even just opened an email during the call. I'm surprised they haven't put up cameras to make sure people don't play on their cell phones at their desks. (Course if they did a lot of the supervisors would get in trouble too, I know because I have SEEN IT.)

The second is I am a rather sensitive person and I do NOT like when people are terse or angry with me, especially when it's for something that is not my fault in any way. Today some old woman was crabbing at ME because she had to wait on hold for half an hour before her call got through (because you know that the shlubs like me answering the phones have total control over that.) I got to a point where I quite literally wanted to tell her, "Lady, the world would be a better place if you just went out and jumped in front of a bus." Now of course that's a terrible thing to say but when you deal with garbage like this for nine hours a day you won't be the nicest person on the block either. I am so tired of dealing with people. 

Another problem with being a sensitive person is that it's easy to get overwhelmed and overstressed when we get busy because the calls DO. NOT. STOP. I have had days at this job where it has literally been eight straight hours of calls with no downtime between except for the five-second pause we get between calls. There have been times (like today) where I have been to the point of tears because I just want it all to STOP for a minute so I can catch my breath. I can always put myself into "work" mode for a minute but whenever you do that you put yourself at risk because if you are not in "available" or "ready" mode for too long during the day you can get in trouble for that too. 

The third is that (on a similar note) I don't like confrontation but it seems like every single day I have to argue with people who seem to think that if they pi** and moan enough they can get what they want. If you go to a car dealer looking for a car that has only three wheels, arguing with the salesperson is not going to change the fact that no such product exists; but for some reason people think if they say, "But that's what I WANT" enough times somehow magically they will be able to buy a three-wheeled car. 

Another thing is that I get tired of answering the same questions over and over and over and over and over again. In fact there are times when I have answered the same question five or six times in the same call. Sometimes I just want to scream at people and say, "I TOLD you that already! Take your thumb out of your ear and put it back in your butt!"

It also doesn't help that people get so nitpicky over things. It's important to understand what it is you're buying, yes. One thing I have learned from this job and another similar job I had is that I have very little sympathy for people who buy something without asking questions, just assuming that it will do what they think it does. (And what happens when we "ASSUME," kids?!) Many many times I have people call up and think that just because they bought insurance for their trip or their flight, they can get their money back if they just decide not to go. No insurance company that did that would stay in business very long. On the other end of the spectrum are the people who call up and say, "I want to know why this policy doesn't specifically state in writing that if I am in an Asian country at 4:16 p.m. Zulu time on the third Thursday of a month with the letter 'R' in it and I need an MRI because of a back spasm I suffer in my lower third quadrant that I am covered. I'm going to call my lawyer!"

I'm just so sick of it. I feel a little better now that I vented about it (plus I'm drinking a alcohol at the same time) but now it also feels like I went and got myself riled up for no reason just by dredging all this back up. I need to get away from here for a while. Maybe I'll go to a movie.

Gawd! Leora,

That's awful. 

I've worked a sales including telesales half my career.  They're the worst. If it wasn't for the ****** management and owners applying management science to the point where food and shelter are optional but sales and calls and activity and metrics must be met.

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What, if anything can we do to be more content with our job or situation?

Or to work to change it for the better?

What has worked?  What hasn't?  

I have some thoughts about this I plan to share in the coming days, but I wanted to post the question here now.

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12 hours ago, gandolfication said:

My outlook on the importance, need and value of formal education has changed drastically since I was younger.  I was a sufficiently nerdy (and ambitious) personality such that I came to like school quite a bit in college and law school...certainly more than almost any job I've had.  I graduated at the tops of my classes with a bunch of honors that seemed valuable and impressive at the time.  I don't devalue either my degrees or the experience I enjoyed while in school (especially college).  Indeed, I have tried to become a professor at various times.  Sure, my degrees helped me get jobs in sales and in law.

But that has diminished greatly over years (admittedly in part because I am not practicing law these days).  

More to the point, our higher ed system (I'll leave alone K-12 for now) is enormously inefficient and overpriced and is not agile or focused enough on employment marketability or competencies.

More flexible systems including on-line education, self-driven education, probably ideally with assistance, some mentorship, guidance, expanded aptitude and performance testing wherever possible, and probably many other things would be superior.  If I had to do over again, I would focus on a field and learn it, with peers, apprenticeships, intern/externships (I did do some of this).  I'd probably still complete some courses in college, but I don't know that I'd even care about getting an associate's degree, or I would get a current employer to pay for my education while working.  Some of this is a little sad and unfortunate because I do believe we NEED a people who are educated and well-rounded in their knowledge.  Some people can do this on their own.  Some cannot.

There are plenty of wealthy entrepreneur pundits out there who have long made the case that while having degrees is more important than ever in terms of even being considered for more and more jobs, in reality, it is often less and less important in practice, and also does not at all teach the kind of agility, risk-taking, technical skills, sales and other soft/interpersonal skills most needed in today's world.

Well said.  I simply went to a technical college and earned an Associates degree in my trade of interest.  (That's about the minimum degree to open doors in my field).  Bang for the buck it was the best investment I ever made.  I paid cash for my degree and had zero debt when I was done.  It opened enough doors and enabled me to make enough money to live well.  Just because you have a bachelors or masters degree doesn't always guarantee a healthy wage.  Only downside to my degree is that it's specialized.  I work in the water treatment industry.  Only so many plants in every city.  Unless your willing to relocate, there is only so much opportunity in one place.  We have many young people that come in the front door with bachelor's degrees that in my opinion are vastly over educated for the type of trade they will be learning.  Most want to go right from training to supervisor, but in reality it doesn't work that way.  Some find this out quickly and leave, others stay for some experience and then leave in bigger pursuits.  I find the minority grind it out long enough to see advancement opportunities open up.  Ive been in this specialty field for 25 years.  If I had to do something else, I most certainly would have to start from scratch.  At this point it doesn't pay to start over, IMHO.

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9 hours ago, gandolfication said:

What, if anything can we do to be more content with our job or situation?

Or to work to change it for the better?

What has worked?  What hasn't?  

I have some thoughts about this I plan to share in the coming days, but I wanted to post the question here now.

The ONLY THING that has ever worked for me is, be willing and ready to find a different job. A job either works or it doesn't, no such thing as fixing it. There is alot of nonsense out there about how to fix a job that isn't working; being more productive, working more hours, there is no "I" in "team", and so on. Such advice is hot air uttered by people who have found a job and/or career ethos that works for them and now think that it can work for anybody. You have to find what works for you, no one is going to do it for you.

What is great about my current job is that it works for me, even if I never get a promotion and things stay exactly the same until I retire. Is it perfect? Hell no, far from it. But it is more than good enough and it took me more than 20 years to find it and I'm not giving it up.

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8 hours ago, Cheddarhead said:

Well said.  I simply went to a technical college and earned an Associates degree in my trade of interest.  (That's about the minimum degree to open doors in my field).  Bang for the buck it was the best investment I ever made.  I paid cash for my degree and had zero debt when I was done.  It opened enough doors and enabled me to make enough money to live well.  Just because you have a bachelors or masters degree doesn't always guarantee a healthy wage.  Only downside to my degree is that it's specialized.  I work in the water treatment industry.  Only so many plants in every city.  Unless your willing to relocate, there is only so much opportunity in one place.  We have many young people that come in the front door with bachelor's degrees that in my opinion are vastly over educated for the type of trade they will be learning.  Most want to go right from training to supervisor, but in reality it doesn't work that way.  Some find this out quickly and leave, others stay for some experience and then leave in bigger pursuits.  I find the minority grind it out long enough to see advancement opportunities open up.  Ive been in this specialty field for 25 years.  If I had to do something else, I most certainly would have to start from scratch.  At this point it doesn't pay to start over, IMHO.

You did well.  I have come to greatly increase the value I perceive for people who were educated, trained and work in their vocation. It is so rare for people with liberal arts degrees to be closely aligned at all with what they focused on studying.  Good for you.

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2 hours ago, Afterglow1978 said:

The ONLY THING that has ever worked for me is, be willing and ready to find a different job. A job either works or it doesn't, no such thing as fixing it. There is alot of nonsense out there about how to fix a job that isn't working; being more productive, working more hours, there is no "I" in "team", and so on. Such advice is hot air uttered by people who have found a job and/or career ethos that works for them and now think that it can work for anybody. You have to find what works for you, no one is going to do it for you.

What is great about my current job is that it works for me, even if I never get a promotion and things stay exactly the same until I retire. Is it perfect? Hell no, far from it. But it is more than good enough and it took me more than 20 years to find it and I'm not giving it up.

I join you in mocking the platitudes you've mentioned above.

But, I think there can be a distinction between the hyperbole of "fixing" a current job versus "fixing" or adjusting/modifying ourselves.  I plan to write more about this later, but I don't think it is a pipe dream to try to do everything in one's power (including yes attitude) to see the value in even a 'bad' or unpleasant job.  I've had to do that, albeit often poorly.  I liken it to the general adage that while positive thinking will not allow one to do anything, it will allow one to do anything better than negative thinking.

That is the basic guiding principle I wish to explore and apply as I have done in the past, which I've allowed depression to largely rob me of in recent years.

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15 hours ago, gandolfication said:

What, if anything can we do to be more content with our job or situation?

Or to work to change it for the better?

What has worked?  What hasn't?  

I have some thoughts about this I plan to share in the coming days, but I wanted to post the question here now.

I think about this A LOT.  I've been at the same company for 27 years - doing many different jobs but with the same employer.  Over the years I've been happy, I've been miserable.  Some managers love me, others loathe me.  My work/attitude is no different, just some people like me and some don't.  Such is life.

For things to be better (for me), I'd need my company to start treating me like a human being, not a "cog in the wheel".  I don't need someone hovering over my shoulder to make sure my break was 15 minutes long and not 16 minutes long. 

My employer has created such a toxic environment, it's exhausting.  For example: You go to the other end of the building to pick up a file or something.  A manager in the department at that end of the building sees you.  They call your manager and say "I just saw your employee down at my end of the building".  ***!  Who cares??  Just because we're not glued to our desks and we're automatically doing something wrong??  It's bizarre.

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53 minutes ago, gardengirlbc said:

I think about this A LOT.  I've been at the same company for 27 years - doing many different jobs but with the same employer.  Over the years I've been happy, I've been miserable.  Some managers love me, others loathe me.  My work/attitude is no different, just some people like me and some don't.  Such is life.

For things to be better (for me), I'd need my company to start treating me like a human being, not a "cog in the wheel".  I don't need someone hovering over my shoulder to make sure my break was 15 minutes long and not 16 minutes long. 

My employer has created such a toxic environment, it's exhausting.  For example: You go to the other end of the building to pick up a file or something.  A manager in the department at that end of the building sees you.  They call your manager and say "I just saw your employee down at my end of the building".  ***!  Who cares??  Just because we're not glued to our desks and we're automatically doing something wrong??  It's bizarre.

Yah, I think I began working at just the ideal time to see this change in modern business.

I think it was inevitable and obvious looking back. You arm owners and managers with extremely simple technological capability to monitor, measure and manage every aspect of work, and naturally that is exactly what they do.  I too worked in a telesales call center where everything was recorded, audio, contemporaneous screen shots, etc.  All sales jobs are metrics driven, and most I've found become oppressive even if the employee has autonomy as some of mine have afforded.  I'd much rather have that freedom....ideally even office from home.

I have to say though that for me, my attitude has changed.  In fact, that's one of the main things I at least want to become more open to examining, while not letting it veer into more self-criticism.

In my early years, I was the proverbial 'go-getter' with energy to burn and wanted to compete and win.  Over time, something in me learned that on the other side, is more work...there is no logical limit except time.  Again, I have to say that if I'd been able to keep my mostly excellent (except for the time and stress) job as an attorney, I would at least have the motivation of having a great paying job that afforded a good life outside of work; only my life outside of work would necessarily be limited by 80 hour weeks most every single week.

I think the big change for me set in as a result of losing hope both consciously and subconsciously.  I know this is the case for so many.  That is something I'm interested in seeing if we can ever improve.

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