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What Has Been Your Experience With Psychiatrist???


kgpremed11

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I'm a second year medical student and psychiatry is one of the specialties I'm interested in along with internal medicine, and anesthesiology. Whatever I choose to go into, I want to make a significant positive impact on peoples lives. I frequent this board because I first started dealing with depression about 5 years ago while in college, I still battle with depression sometimes but I am able to mange my life better now. I kinda just want to get a feel about what people in general think of psychiatrist and is there anything they can do to make your patient experience better? Would you have liked for them to spend more time with you or offer therapy in addition to medication management? Any feed back is truly appreciated.  

Edited by kgpremed11
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I like my psychiatrist.  He worked with me to find a medicine that worked for me by listening to me and my comments on how I felt while on certain meds.  He would then ask specific questions that I hadn't thought about regarding behavior, moods, or other possible symptoms to see if I had experienced any of them while on the meds.  He is very investigative and attentive.  And what truly sets him apart from most every other psychiatrist I have encountered, he is able to provide talk therapy as well during our 30 min sessions...and the majority of the time he is on point and delivers relevant suggestions, observations, and tools for me to use.  He's also been at it for 37 years and experienced many of the same life events that I have...loss and grief, career mistakes, financial loss, etc. etc.  Which really leads me to the point I'd like to make.  Consider pursuing other careers and give yourself time to experience or observe more real life events.  Chances are, if you are like most men, you will change careers a couple times in your life.  So when you have more life experience I believe you will find it easier to relate to and actually hear what your patients are saying and be able to provide more relevant and helpful treatment.  I didn't know this until after the fact, but that's the route my current therapist took.  And I picked her out of 8 others that I met with/interviewed because in one meeting I felt she understood my statements more clearly and actually made a comment that let me know...she gets it.  I'd also like to encourage you to consider the therapist route over the psychiatrist route.  You could pursue a Psy D for example.  That's just a personal opinion that working as a therapist would be more rewarding than working as a psychiatrist.  

 

Best of luck in your collegiate pursuits and whatever field you choose,

PO 

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I used to go to the university psychiatrist when I went to school, she was great. Really listened to my problems and felt like a second therapist. Since then I've just been to GPs, who mainly focus on meds rather than listening to patients. There's definitely a lot less trust there. Like I would've told my psychiatrist I was suicidal, but I'd never tell my GP. Sometimes a listening ear is what people need most. You are already off to a good start since you have personal experience and are already showing you care for your future patients. Good luck to you :smile:

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Most of the psychiatrists I have been to only did med management.  I have been seeing my current psychiatrist for over a year and I don't think he ever asked me how I am.  Thinking about that, the applies to the one before him as well and that was around 3 years.  It's like going to a Psycho pharmacologist.

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I agree - they seem to a) see things at the 30,000-foot level and b) dispense meds.  Most of my psychiatrist visits lasted 15-20 minutes.

 

As regards the meds, I'd like to see them develop and use a FAQ with their patients.  Why am I prescribing THIS med?  What do my patients see as side effects?  How soon should I see results?  And what would those results be?  Some sort of basic primer to cover pertinent questions that a patient may not think to ask...

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I have only see one so obviously this doesn't count for all psychiatrists but I found he totally underestimated how sick I was (depression) just because I looked OK and I can talk about it easily. He didn't offer me any help, same went for at least 3 psychologists I've seen. Just don't go off on how someone looks (still taking care of themselves) and the fact that they can talk about it like it's no big deal, which was my way of handeling it.

The only person who ever truly took me seriously and saw past it was/is my GP.

Edited by Cupcake_girl
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BTW, Anesthesiologists make a crap ton of money and I believe you can find programs at many hospitals that will actually pay for your Anesthesiology degree in exchange for working for their hospital 5 years.  Or something to that effect.  So go do that for 10 to 15 years and make bank.  Then circle back and pick up an LCSW or LPC and be a Therapist and keep two time slots open per day for patients that can't afford to pay for therapy.  Just some creative thinking I wish someone **cough** useless guidance counselors/dad **cough** would have discussed with me when I was in college.  LOL.  

 

Just keep your mind open and think outside the box.  What you choose to get your degree in does not lock you into a career you have to stay with for the rest of your life. 

 

In the words of Scooby Doo....Rots of Ruck!

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I like my psychiatrist, 'cause she only types what I say. There' s a subjective and an objective point of view ( her point of view) and though I know that most of the time I visit her , I look quite normal, her objective part is not very different from my words.. She believes me but in fact, why she shouln't...

My former psychiatrists didn't trust me yet I never lied to them or I never exaggerated my symptoms. One of these psychiatrists denied to deal with a severe depression of my friend and she later died, alone, deliberately.

But, I mean, in our country, in my district definitely, pdocs say they have a lot of patients and no time for the new ones.

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