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Low-Grade Depression ''dysthymia'' Is The Worst Of All

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Mild depression is like mental water torture,you are stuck in between feeling good and bad but you always feel the inner restlessness and deep buried anxiety inside you. That's the chronic form of depression and that tortures you every second.

 

The symptoms are similar to major depression with feelings of despair and hopelessness and low self-esteem.

 

I wish i had an other type of depression instead of that chronic,persistent and never ending dysthymia.

 

 

The Facts on Dysthymic Disorder

Dysthymia is a mood or affective disorder. It is a chronic, mild depression that lasts for a long period of time. The word dysthymia comes from Greek roots meaning "ill-humour." Dysthymic disorder has less of the mental and physical symptoms that a person with major depressive disorder experiences.

The condition usually starts in early adulthood, and the disorder can last for years or even decades. Later onset is usually associated with bereavement or obvious stress, and often follows on the heels of a more extreme depressive episode. Women are twice as likely as men to suffer from dysthymia, in a similar ratio to that seen with major depression.

In the past, dysthymia had several other names: depressive neurosis, neurotic depression, depressive personality disorder, and persistent anxiety depression.

Causes of Dysthymic Disorder

The exact cause of dysthymia is not known, but a combination of factors are thought to play a role in its development. Heredity (genetics) can play a role, and people with family members who have depression or dysthymia are more likely to experience dysthymia, especially when it starts early in life (teens to early 20s).

Changes in neurotransmitters (chemical messengers) in the brain may also precipitate dysthymia. Chronic stress or medical illness, social isolation, and thoughts and perceptions about the world, can all influence the development of dysthymia. Other mental health conditions (e.g., borderline personality disorder) can also increase the risk of its development.

About 1 out of 4 people with dysthymia develop the condition in midlife, known as late-onset dysthymia. Symptoms usually follow a particular depressive episode, related to some shock or loss a person has experienced.

 

 

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Careful what you wish for.

 

I was (mis)diagnosed with dysthymia and put on medication that gave me a taste of what major depression feels like.

 

From my experience there's no "worst of all". It's like trying to compare being burned alive to being buried alive. They're both horrific in their own way.

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yes you are all right but medicines for other type of depression work better and faster for me...it's hard to cure dysthymia and dysthymia can turn into a chronic illness and a burden that you'll have it all life long.

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Dysthymia is a masked depression,but it's a different type of depression

 

 

Dysthymia
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For the genus of moth, see Dysthymia (moth).
Dysthymic disorder Classification and external resources Specialty Psychiatry ICD-10 F34.1 ICD-9-CM 300.4 MedlinePlus 000918 MeSH D019263

Dysthymia (/dɪsˈθmiə/ dis-THY-mee-ə, from Ancient Greek δυσθυμία, "bad state of mind"), sometimes also called neurotic depression,[1]dysthymic disorder, or chronic depression, is a mood disorder consisting of the same cognitive and physical problems as in depression, with less severe but longer-lasting symptoms.[2][3] The concept was coined by Robert Spitzer as a replacement for the term "depressive personality" in the late 1970s.[4]

According to the diagnosis manual DSM-IV of 1994, dysthymia is a serious state of chronic depression, which persists for at least two years (1 year for children and adolescents). Serious state of chronic depression will last at least three years, with this length of recovery, it can stay balanced enough to control it from major depressive disorder. Dysthymia is less acute and severe than major depressive disorder.[5] As dysthymia is a chronic disorder, sufferers may experience symptoms for many years before it is diagnosed, if diagnosis occurs at all. As a result, they may believe that depression is a part of their character, so they may not even discuss their symptoms with doctors, family members, or friends.

Dysthymia often co-occurs with other mental disorders. A "double depression" is the occurrence of episodes of major depression in addition to dysthymia. Switching between periods of dysthymic moods and periods of hypomanic moods is indicative of cyclothymia, which is a mild variant of bipolar disorder.

In the DSM-5, dysthymia is replaced by persistent depressive disorder. This new condition includes both chronic major depressive disorder and the previous dysthymic disorder. The reason for this change is that there was no evidence for meaningful differences between these two conditions.[6]

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You do realize that in that quote it says that it includes both Chronic Major Depressive Disorder too right? Look, my point is, this isn't a competition of who's suffering the most. All mental illnesses suck. 

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Yes it's called ''double depression''....depression from dysthymia is under-recognized.Second, people with dysthymia come to view depression as just part of who they are, and so they don’t come in to treatment as often even when they dip down into a major depression.They found that double-depressed patients had high levels of hopelessness, whereas patients with either major depression or dysthymia alone showed more moderate levels of hopelessness.

 

I'm saying you can have them both the depression from dystimic disorder and the major depressive disorder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Also from wikipedia "sometimes also called neurotic depression,[1]dysthymic disorder, or chronic depression, is a mood disorder consisting of the same cognitive and physical problems as in depression, with less severe but longer-lasting symptoms."

 

Also I never said that you couldn't have depression. That said, it is less "severe" according to multiple sources. As I said before, all mental illnesses suck and frankly I don't know what you're trying to get at. We're all in this together and also, I don't agree with the "moderate levels of hopeless" thing. Oh and I have major depression and have always thought of it as part of me. So yeah, I really don't know what you're trying to get at other than trying to "win" at a competition that doesn't even exist. :/

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It is a chronic low grade depression which is lowering your mood every second. Major depression has its own ups and downs but dystimia doesn't. Common SSRI'S and SNRI'S meds don't cure it fully. 

 

I've found my own meds that work for me,one of them is Mirtazapine which is a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA) and secondly i take Desyrel which triggers major neurotransmitters acetylcholine,norepinephrine,dopamine and serotonin.  

 

I already won the competition cause my pdoc's suggestions didn't work on me..now with my own choices for a week i feel 70% better than the past :O

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Uh.. you're really making stuff up now. Also, anti-depressants don't "cure" depression, they keep it in check.

 

That's great that your meds work for you.

 

Also, there is no competition going on. If your suggestions work for you? Great. Just don't belittle other peoples choices.

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I was diagnosed with dysthymia way back in my 20s and offered counseling but at the time I refused to believe the doctor.  I was stressed and anxious, moody and had what the doctor called a flat effect. My emotions in general were not there.  And though I could laugh and have fun there was a dead spot inside and some dark feelings haunting me.  This was my constant demeanor most of my life and I only had a couple short brushes with severe depression after intense periods of anxiety that was until the last one when I could not come out of it. I then spent 2 full years in constant severe depression.  Emotional pain and despair and an overwhelming need to get out.  Over these past 2 years i have been going back and forth between severe depression and dysthmyia.  Honestly for me the dysthymia is better.  At least I can function and I'm not crying all the time.  Not that crying is bad but the desperate need to get out trumps feeling dead inside from my perspective.  This all said, all of us having our difference of opinion on what is worse, the only thing that is helping both, helping me to recover from all degrees of depression, is facing head on the thoughts and beliefs that are blocking my ability to feel good.  For me those thoughts centered on low self image, self blame, and feeling not good enough. Now that I am working to turn those thoughts around I am starting to feel like I may be able to liberate myself from any degree of depression.  Like Dragonwings said, meds only work to keep the symptoms in check.  What are you doing to try to find and deal with the root cause?  It is a process that takes time to uncover but has been well worth it for me.

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yes you are right i was wrong at that point...there's no endpoint has been defined for the treatment of depression,there's no knowing or a test for you to know that you are fully recovered from that illness forever.

 

i'm toasted between in severe depression and dysthmyia too,im just saying some meds are good for depression and others are good for dysthmyia, i needed to find a good combo of meds to treat them both equally. 

 

it's like having a double depression for me,they have their own unique characteristics and effects.

 

dysthmyia is the worst for me because it triggers an other depression in me.

 

 

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That is interesting. Why do you think simply having dysthymia does it?  Is it the having it or noticing that you have it that does it?   I have been able to learn to be pretty mindful.  It took some time but in doing so I could see the times I get triggered that send me back into severe depression.  What usually makes those trigger points worse is that I then tend to ruminate and talk myself into feeling even worse.  My thoughts basically cause me to spiral into feeling suicidal.  Is it possible it isn't so much feeling dysthymia that is causing you to flip back into severe depression but rather the thoughts that you are putting behind the way you feel?  You have found meds that help the big hurt but not the little so is it possible that you are fretting with your thoughts to the point of things getting worse again? 

 

I guess I find comment interesting to me because I have never thought of my dysthymia in terms of it being the problem.  I have always tried to deny I had a problem in the first place I guess is why.  It was only by becoming severely depressed that I even bothered to look at it.  I likely didn't look at it because the pain behind the severe depression terrified the snot out of me.  I was trying to run like mad from it.  So I guess I just learned to live with generalized depression and became pretty good at pretending.  I see now I never would have dealt with it unless things got worse because I was fine with the status quo.  But even still even when I became severely depressed I didn't so much see depression as the issue.  I guess that is maybe the benefit of having self blame as your root cause.  I blamed myself not my depression for being depressed.  There was something wrong with me.  I was doing something wrong to make myself depressed.  But in doing so I actually put my mind to fixing what I was doing, what I was thinking to be precise and maybe because of it I inadvertently went down a helpful path with mindfulness.  I haven't spent anytime trying to fix depression.  I have spent time trying to fix myself, my thoughts, because for me at least, it is the thoughts that are blocking my ability to be happy.  Fear and low self image kept me from wanting to feel emotions and kept me sitting on the sidelines of life never finding excitement.   And then fear and low self image is what caused me to turn on myself when I could no longer hold the emotions in.  So I have been working on fear and self image thoughts and I honestly feel like I am liberating myself from that dead spot that was my constant companion.  Now I am not naive to think I won't ever crash again, considering I have a brain wired for strong emotions it very well could happen again during another life crisis but I am learning tools at how to be mindful of my triggers and not allow my thoughts to ruminate me into being suicidal.  And I am learning to give myself a break, to allow myself to make mistakes and fail so that I can go out and try and engage the world instead of hiding from it.  It isn't easy to turn a lifetime of thinking around but it feels like I am in some way liberating myself.    I didn't mean to go into a long drawn out story about my depression but your comment gave me perspective on how I was viewing my depression.  I wasn't judging the depression or the depressive state but myself.  Well anyways, maybe try to be a bit mindful of your thoughts when you notice you are in Dysthymia. It might be the noticing that is causing some thoughts to run away with you???

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Yes i feel just like you,yesterday was a miracle for the first time after months i enjoyed a day without depression...i was a normal person with normal emotions but now the effect is gone i'm suicidal again and the black hole inside me is back. :( life is going on..depression has its own deep roots inside us...clearing those roots may take years or a life time long.

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Dysthymia is not very responsive to medications.

Major depressions are more responsive to medication.

 

I always have dysthymia my whole life.

Don't ask me what happiness is. I don't know.

I don't know what being a normal person means.

So I had no idea how to get happiness and enjoy life.

 

Dysthymic persons are much more likely to get major depressive episodes than normal people.

They call it 'double depression'.

I did have double depression twice.

 

Those are the reasons why it is very bad.

But good thing about dysthymia is that it is not very severe.

Your functionality is not impaired as in major depressions and other psychotic illnesses.

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Yes Michelle38 and dolphin2015...3 days ago i found out mirtazapine is the only med responding to my dysthymia i took 60mg of it now i'm high and every energic..kinda i feel 60% of happiness and joy inside me..now it's midnight and i don't want to sleep cause i like this fake happiness effect i'm having now...but after it's effect wears of im suicidal again with deep buried anxiety.

 

 

     

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