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Found 73 results

  1. I am so depressed and anxious lately, I can't escape these negative thoughts or panic feelings, I cant go out, I cant work, I can do nothing. I feel like a failure, like my life has been a waste and that I'm worthless, ugly, fat, disgusting, dumb, that I cant do it. These words circle round my head constantly all day, everyday. I cant get away. Ive started therapy because I've tried everything to help myself and not need therapy, but I do and I cant help myself, and I know I'm in a really bad place right now and there's nothing I can do to help myself out, I cant crawl out of this. And death feels like the only way. Im aware of how depressing and hopeless this message sounds, and I do not want to die. I want to get better and live a life of freedom. That feels impossible.
  2. This is probably going to be a long post. I am a single male who has recently turned thirty who is going through a crisis of sorts. I've posted about this before but I'm feeling bad once again so I need to vent. I did not have my first real "girlfriend" until about 4 months ago. The relationship was great at first (save some red flags I blissfully ignored), but it quickly deteriorated and she dumped me... on the day before I turned 30. This hit me really hard. I'm still not over it. The day after I got dumped I started messaging someone else I met online. We never met up, but we texted a lot and she really helped me get through the breakup. She had recently gotten out of a relationship too and was kind of going through the same thing. Eventually I asked her if she wanted to meet up and she said "sure". She went on vacation and we were going to meet up after she got back. When she got back I texted her and she said she didn't "think either of us was in a good place to meet up". I was really upset, but I pretended like nothing happened and kept texting, and she kept texting back. A couple weeks later she texted me and said she was "going to try and go on a date with someone, could backfire". I was floored. I didn't know what to say so I just wished her well. The next day I texted her and asked her how it went, and she said it went well. I later texted her and told her that I thought it was really crappy that I met her on a dating site and after having gone back on her offer to meet up is now telling me about other guys she is dating. I told her I didn't go online looking for a platonic relationship and that she should not have led me on. She got defensive, telling me how I wasn't over my ex, but somehow she was magically over hers. We argued back and forth, and she blamed me for getting bitter at her, but I think that relationship is done. I feel like my ex treated me much the same way. She would lead me on and talk about doing certain things but when I would call her out on something she would get defensive. Eventually she broke up with me because we couldn't get along. Here comes the fun part. I've dealt with depression my whole life. The only reason I was able to get a girlfriend was I had gotten to a place where I actually felt pretty good about myself. Now, having been rejected, and I feel, mislead, twice, I'm at the lowest point I've ever been. I no longer smoke cigarettes. but I'm extremely addicted to e-cigs, and I am going through those so fast its blowing so much money. I'm also on three different antidepressants and am seeing a therapist. It seems like none of this is helping. I literally feel miserable 90 percent of the time. The other 10 percent is not great, because I know I'm going to feel miserable again soon. The cloud that is looming over my head is unreal. Almost nothing will help me escape the mental hell that I am feeling. I feel completely worthless. I'm 6'1", have been told I'm attractive, but feel like I'm an absolute ogre when I look at myself in the mirror. Additionally I feel really insecure about my career and feel like I'm spinning my wheels. I work a data entry job, and while that is mostly low stress, I don't make a ton of money and I feel like I'm wasting my talents. I only have a Bachelors degree, but I have a major in business, and minors in information systems and Spanish. I feel like I learned almost nothing in college, and career wise I have nothing to show for it. This all feeds my insecurity. I feel like women take one look at me and they see that I'm a failure. I also feel incredibly socially awkward, and while I can make small talk with people I'm not trying to impress, if its a potential love interest or someone of high status that may be able to get me a job, I feel like a bumbling idiot. I feel like people can almost sense desperation in me, and maybe even a hint of creepiness. The only debt I have is my house. Its an inexpensive house, but my parents loaned me the money and I am paying them back. I love that I am a homeowner but I don't feel that I have earned it. I feel like they feel guilty that I turned out the way I did and are doing everything they can to help me out. Because of this, I feel like a leech. Probably if I had no help I'd be more motivated because if I was starving, well, that's a hell of a motivator. I've talked to my mom about some of these concerns and she assures me that none of the negative things I think about myself are true, but of course she's my mom, she has to say that. I've tried delving into self help and religion in order to attempt to help myself. I go to church and try to pray and occasionally read scripture. I also have listened to The Secret several times on audio book, and have really tried to utilize the power of positive thinking. The problem is at a certain point I can't muster the strength to think positive anymore and I think I've just been deluding myself all the times I actually do feel good about myself. Its gotten so bad lately that I've had thoughts of suicide. I don't think I would ever act out, but my therapist was concerned that if we don't meet more I may end up putting myself in the hospital. Sometimes I wonder if therapy and antidepressants are actually helping and think that all the money is just going down the drain. I feel incredibly alone. I have a dog, and that helps, but I need human companionship. When I get dumped or rejected, the pain is unreal and I end up acting like a complete asshole, sealing the entire deal for certain. I've also developed an incredibly negative attitude towards women which I am not proud of. I want to get married. Maybe one day have kids, who knows. But the depression, the insecurity, the anxiety... its unreal. I honestly feel like my brain is constantly telling my body it needs to die... and there's not a damn thing I can do about it. If I could snap out of it, get a better career, develop a healthy relationship with someone, maybe things would get better. But right now, I feel helpless. I feel like no one can help me, and I have no idea what to do in order to move myself forward and get out of this terrible rut (or canyon) that I'm stuck in.
  3. Hello, only been here a while after I spiraled down pretty fast emotionally. Since then, I've come to reevaluate some decisions I've made. One of these decisions was quitting my medication for anxiety: venlafaxine. I was prescribed it while at college but I decided through supervision of the university health center to taper off it in anticipation of graduation and a bumpy road I had with withdrawal symptoms and whatnot. I just didn't want to deal with withdrawal symptoms that came too often because getting a new prescription got tricky often. I honestly thought I had worked enough within myself to no longer need it and be able to cope without it, but I'm just not sure anymore. Now, I have a lot of questions and no professionals to ask it too while I'm away from school. FYI, I still haven't graduated, took a semester's hiatus thinking I could save money while I got some other life stuff in check; no luck on much of that and I regret not having kept on track with school now. If I were to go on medication for anxiety, would it be venlafaxine again? I remember having tried to get on prozac before some fluke happened. Would I be able to go on that or another medication altogether? How do I know if I need it or if it's something else that makes me go down mentally? I'm not in great circumstances right now so it's felt like an emotional rollercoaster between trying to keep my spirits up and sinking straight down to the dumps. Is it just the situation that's draining me so bad or is it just my lack of medication no longer making up for it? I remember I could still get pretty sour even when on venlafaxine, so I just have no idea if it would be any better if I got on it or any other meds.
  4. PTSD - Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: It’s Not Just Veterans Sources: National Institute of Mental Health: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd/index.shtml HelpGuide: http://www.helpguide.org/articles/ptsd-trauma/post-traumatic-stress-disorder.htm Anxiety & Depression Association of America: http://www.adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/posttraumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd National Institute of Mental Health What is Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)? When in danger, it’s natural to feel afraid. This fear triggers many split-second changes in the body to prepare to defend against the danger or to avoid it. This “fight-or-flight” response is a healthy reaction meant to protect a person from harm. But in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this reaction is changed or damaged. People who have PTSD may feel stressed or frightened even when they’re no longer in danger. PTSD develops after a terrifying ordeal that involved physical harm or the threat of physical harm. The person who develops PTSD may have been the one who was harmed, the harm may have happened to a loved one, or the person may have witnessed a harmful event that happened to loved ones or strangers. PTSD was first brought to public attention in relation to war veterans, but it can result from a variety of traumatic incidents, such as mugging, rape, torture, being kidnapped or held captive, child abuse, car accidents, train wrecks, plane crashes, bombings, or natural disasters such as floods or earthquakes. Signs & Symptoms PTSD can cause many symptoms. These symptoms can be grouped into three categories: 1. Re-experiencing symptoms Flashbacks—reliving the trauma over and over, including physical symptoms like a racing heart or sweatingBad dreamsFrightening thoughts. Re-experiencing symptoms may cause problems in a person’s everyday routine. They can start from the person’s own thoughts and feelings. Words, objects, or situations that are reminders of the event can also trigger re-experiencing. 2. Avoidance symptoms Staying away from places, events, or objects that are reminders of the experienceFeeling emotionally numbFeeling strong guilt, depression, or worryLosing interest in activities that were enjoyable in the pastHaving trouble remembering the dangerous event. Things that remind a person of the traumatic event can trigger avoidance symptoms. These symptoms may cause a person to change his or her personal routine. For example, after a bad car accident, a person who usually drives may avoid driving or riding in a car. 3. Hyperarousal symptoms Being easily startledFeeling tense or “on edge”Having difficulty sleeping, and/or having angry outbursts. Hyperarousal symptoms are usually constant, instead of being triggered by things that remind one of the traumatic event. They can make the person feel stressed and angry. These symptoms may make it hard to do daily tasks, such as sleeping, eating, or concentrating. It’s natural to have some of these symptoms after a dangerous event. Sometimes people have very serious symptoms that go away after a few weeks. This is called acute stress disorder, or ASD. When the symptoms last more than a few weeks and become an ongoing problem, they might be PTSD. Some people with PTSD don’t show any symptoms for weeks or months. Who Is At Risk? PTSD can occur at any age, including childhood. Women are more likely to develop PTSD than men, and there is some evidence that susceptibility to the disorder may run in families. Anyone can get PTSD at any age. This includes war veterans and survivors of physical and sexual assault, abuse, accidents, disasters, and many other serious events. Not everyone with PTSD has been through a dangerous event. Some people get PTSD after a friend or family member experiences danger or is harmed. The sudden, unexpected death of a loved one can also cause PTSD. Why do some people get PTSD and other people do not? It is important to remember that not everyone who lives through a dangerous event gets PTSD. In fact, most will not get the disorder. Many factors play a part in whether a person will get PTSD. Some of these are risk factors that make a person more likely to get PTSD. Other factors, called resilience factors, can help reduce the risk of the disorder. Some of these risk and resilience factors are present before the trauma and others become important during and after a traumatic event. Risk factors for PTSD include: Living through dangerous events and traumasHaving a history of mental illnessGetting hurtSeeing people hurt or killedFeeling horror, helplessness, or extreme fearHaving little or no social support after the eventDealing with extra stress after the event, such as loss of a loved one, pain and injury, or loss of a job or home.Resilience factors that may reduce the risk of PTSD include: Seeking out support from other people, such as friends and familyFinding a support group after a traumatic eventFeeling good about one’s own actions in the face of dangerHaving a coping strategy, or a way of getting through the bad event and learning from itBeing able to act and respond effectively despite feeling fear. Researchers are studying the importance of various risk and resilience factors. With more study, it may be possible someday to predict who is likely to get PTSD and prevent it. HelpGuide Getting help for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Recovering from PTSD involves helping your nervous system return to its pre-trauma state of balance. As discussed above, the best way to regulate your nervous system is through social engagement—interacting with another human being—be it a loved one, a friend, or a professional therapist. However, as someone with PTSD, you need to first become “unstuck” and move out of the immobilization stress response. While this process is easier with the guidance and support of an experienced therapist or doctor, you don’t need to wait for a medical appointment to start feeling better. There are plenty of things you can do now to help yourself cope with symptoms, reduce anxiety and fear, and take back control of your life. PTSD Self-Help Tips (See the website for more details) 1) Get moving. (spending time in nature) 2) Connect with others. 3) Challenge your sense of helplessness. 4) Take care of yourself. Helping someone with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) If a loved one has post-traumatic stress disorder, it can take a heavy toll on your relationship and family life. It can be hard to understand why your loved one won’t open up to you—why he or she is less affectionate and more volatile. The symptoms of PTSD can also result in job loss, substance abuse, and other stressful problems. Letting your family member’s PTSD dominate your life while ignoring your own needs is a surefire recipe for burnout. In order to take care of your loved one, you first need to take care of yourself. It’s also helpful to learn all you can about PTSD. The more you know about the symptoms and treatment options, the better equipped you'll be to help your loved one and keep things in perspective. Tips for helping a loved one with PTSD Be patient and understanding. Getting better takes time so be patient with the pace of recovery and offer a sympathetic ear. A person with PTSD may need to talk about the traumatic event over and over again. This is part of the healing process, so avoid the temptation to tell your loved one to stop rehashing the past and move on. Try to anticipate and prepare for PTSD triggers. Common triggers include anniversary dates; people or places associated with the trauma; and certain sights, sounds, or smells. If you are aware of what triggers may cause an upsetting reaction, you’ll be in a better position to offer your support and help your loved one calm down. Don’t take the symptoms of PTSD personally. Common symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder include emotional numbness, anger, and withdrawal. If your loved one seems distant, irritable, or closed off, remember that this may not have anything to do with you or your relationship. Don’t pressure your loved one into talking. It is often very difficult for people with PTSD to talk about their traumatic experiences. For some, it can even make things worse. Never try to force your loved one to open up. Let the person know, however, that you’re there when and if he or she wants to talk.
  5. Non-Soldiers Suffer Post-Traumatic Stress August 15, 2005 GLENVILLE, N.Y. (AP) -- For hundreds of thousands of Americans, mental illness is just a drive down the road. Ask Beth Puglisi. The 45-year-old mother was out to fill her gas tank on a bitter-cold January day last year. She turned the wheel of her pickup, felt a wrenching jolt, and watched the roadway fly into a spin. "No!" she heard herself screech. The rubbery aroma of spilled antifreeze filled her nostrils. In the days after her crash with a car, she took to the couch, weeping -- but not over her fractured vertebra and dislocated shoulder. Her mind was staggering. "It felt like a death," she says. Her body was quickly tended, but it took months before doctors even put a name to her other injury: post-traumatic stress disorder. Once associated mainly with the horror of combat, PTSD has stretched to take in more frequent swerves along life's road -- car crashes, house fires, a sudden death or severe family illness, witnessing a disaster, or even learning of one. PTSD has broadened the model of mental illness to cover disturbances set off solely by external events, outside of the mind. Almost anyone can be vulnerable. Research suggests the disorder is now present in 5 percent of Americans, or more than 13 million, according to the PTSD Alliance, which unites professionals and advocates. It is expected to touch 8 percent of adults during their lives. By contrast, just over 3 percent of Americans have cancer. Puglisi had been in accidents before, but she never felt this way. She couldn't stop picking over this crash in her mind. It wasn't her fault; it just wasn't. So why did it have to happen? Why? Her family encouraged her to talk: "Each time I would tell someone about it, I could feel it and smell it -- the whole thing." In a kind of flashback typical of PTSD, she could still smell the antifreeze. As PTSD's debilitating anxiety took hold, Puglisi started to feel nervous, flushed, even lightheaded when she was driven to a doctor or physical therapist. She would tremble, and her chest would tighten: "Just thinking about it was making me crazy." When she tried driving again, she'd have to circle around to avoid making the same kind of turn as in the crash. She'd bypass where it happened. Ashamed, she asked her husband to drive the children to their activities. While television droned war news from Iraq, she felt trapped in her own combat zone: "When you're in the war, you have no idea if you're going to be alive or dead in 10 minutes. That's exactly the way I felt." Warring soldiers have carried home psychological scars for centuries. The ancient Greeks noticed it. In American wars, it has been called shell shock, combat fatigue and post-Vietnam syndrome. Though skeptics discounted some cases as shams meant to win compensation, other extreme cases were taken for schizophrenia. Medical authorities first accepted PTSD as a distinct psychiatric condition in 1980 at the urging of Vietnam veterans and their medical caretakers. In PTSD, stress hormones like adrenaline scorch a painful event deep into long-term memory, scientists believe. Lab studies show such hormones normally improve memory in animals. They seem to overshoot the mark in PTSD. People get very edgy and fearful, prone to nightmares or flashbacks. They desperately want to avoid reminders of their shock, even to the point of feeling numb. PTSD happens more often in women, in cases of multiple traumas (Puglisi had another road accident just a couple weeks earlier), and in people with depression. Once defined, the disease was soon embraced, and insurance coverage expanded. Here was a psychiatric condition touched off by concrete events, not something hidden in the mind's dim recesses. It could theoretically happen to anyone, even the hardiest and soundest of mind. It wasn't your fault. The federal government established the National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. It began researching PTSD and treating hundreds of thousands of veterans. Survivors from rape and car crashes began to seek therapy in greater numbers too. In 1994, the sudden death of a relative, or even learning that one was hurt, joined the expanding list of PTSD traumas in the chief diagnostic manual for psychiatry. By the late 1990s, when Dr. Greenbrier Almond was working as a psychiatrist at a West Virginia veterans hospital, PTSD was already its leading diagnosis, above heart disease and diabetes, he says. Over the past five years, the number of cases among veterans -- mostly from combat -- has exploded nationally by almost 80 percent to 215,871 last year, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs. It is the agency's fastest-growing disability. No similar statistics are collected for civilians, but the numbers are clearly substantial. Dr. Almond, who has left the veterans hospital, now treats PTSD in abused children at a community health clinic. Research at Henry Ford Health System, Harvard and Georgia State has identified the two leading causes of PTSD as unexpected deaths of relatives and car crashes. Combat ranks far down on the list. Some bad diagnosticians and purveyors of pop culture have come to consider just about any of life's shocks -- divorcing, losing a job, even failing a test -- as triggers for PTSD. Though veterans officials say rising awareness has driven most of their growth, they are also reviewing whether some cases have been diagnosed too readily. "Anything that happens to you that's remotely icky now qualifies," says psychologist J. Gayle Beck, at the University at Buffalo-State University of New York. "It's been culturally overdiagnosed." This psychiatric illness has carried cultural baggage since its birth in the social turmoil over the Vietnam War. The new disorder tied to external events meshed with a Kafkaesque view of society inherited from the 1960s: Outside forces constantly threaten peace of mind. Since 2001, PTSD has tapped into another source of anxiety: terrorists who can inflict mass death in an instant. A survey found highly elevated rates of PTSD in the New York metropolitan area, where the smoking towers of the World Trade Center could be seen for miles. Afterward, some companies sent reassuring notices to workers listing PTSD symptoms and saying they were common responses. One compared them to a minor flu. "It speaks to dangerous times and threats, and that certainly defines our era," says Dr. Robert Jay Lifton, a Harvard University psychiatrist who helped define PTSD as a condition. "There is bound to be widespread PTSD and an awareness of it." Even so, many people with PTSD still do not come forward for help, caregivers say. And even experts may miss the signs. "My father dropped dead in front of my mother. She developed PTSD for two years, and I was completely unaware of it. I knew something was wrong, but I didn't know it was PTSD," says psychologist Terence Keane. Yet he is director of behavioral science at the federal PTSD center. The good news is this: Even untreated, PTSD goes away in about half of the cases within six months, research indicates. The bad news: When it doesn't, it can last for decades. Puglisi had never needed therapy before and didn't think of treating her embarrassing automotive anxiety. "I would say I'm all right," she recalls. But she wasn't. Her doctor told her she'd soon get over it, but her physical therapists knew better. After several months, they persuaded her to look for help. She found Edward Hickling, a former veterans psychologist who now specializes in road-accident PTSD. "I came to private practice, and I saw motor-vehicle accident victims that looked a lot like ... the post-traumatic stress responses I saw in the veterans hospital," says the therapist based in nearby Albany. Like many PTSD therapists, he relies on cognitive behavioral therapy. A common psychological treatment, it teaches how to replace negative mental monologues ("I could die on the way to work") with positive, rational ones ("I'll probably get there just fine, as usual"). It can be carried out one-on-one or in groups. Like many PTSD therapists, Hickling re-exposes participants to memories of the terrifying situation, while desensitizing them over a few months or longer. They start by telling what happened and graduate to driving back to the crash site. One woman was able to drive back and gaze at the place where her car plunged down a hill, trapping her for more than two hours. Later, she felt as though she had "removed a cloud from her brain," according to Hickling. The therapy can work in up to 75 percent of road-accident survivors with chronic PTSD, research suggests. Some patients, though, can't tolerate thoughts of their ordeal. "It's just too painful," says psychologist Charles Figley, at Florida State University. Lesser symptoms persist in many people. Psychiatrists often treat PTSD with drugs. The federal government has approved two depression medicines, Zoloft and Paxil, for PTSD. Research suggests they help at least a quarter of PTSD patients. Other researchers are experimenting with potential PTSD drugs like anti-adrenaline agents and the antibiotic D-cycloserine. In theory, they might disrupt the consolidation of long-term PTSD memories or help the brain forget them later. Psychological therapy alone conquered Puglisi's symptoms, though it took a year. She still hasn't gone back to work but doesn't feel so alone. Now she knows of many others like her: "The mind does this sometimes." What happened to her, she has learned, is normal. Copyright 2005 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.
  6. Hello, I always come here when i want to vent or talk about my anxiety or depression that i try to hide on a daily basis. I want to talk about how in certain social situations I shake uncontrollably and stammer with my speech. Around 2 weeks ago I got myself together and started applying to places for a job. I ended up talking to a manager at Bed Bath & Beyond. My voice started trembling, which I honestly expected. After a few Q&A exchanges back and forth my chest and head started shaking, I had to lean forward and pretend I was grooming my hair but i was really trying to hold my head steady. It was definitely an experience that i wouldn't soon forget. Well that moment came and went, today I was meeting someone from Craigslist to whom of which i was selling a Megalodon shark tooth that i found a few years back. I dressed in clothes that would make me feel confident, I listened to music that put me in a good mood all morning. Essentially doing my rituals to try to curb my social anxiety before i go into public. I met the guy, Shook his hand and it started again. Uncontrollable shaking from my feet to my hands all the way up to my neck and head. I feel really comfortable in my skin, right until the eye contact and dialogue exchange begins. As I start talking in situations such as this, I have these thoughts racing through my head such as; Why am i shaking, continuously re-assuring myself "im cool, im cool, people like me, why should i be nervous and uncontrollably shaking and anxious. I can stop doing this any time i want." I stopped shaking for seconds at a time, numerous times, as my self-supportive thoughts raced through my head. I couldn't turn it around, actually I turn things into a vicious cycle. I keep these thoughts racing through my head, and as the social interaction is going on I am almost oblivious as to what to say or how to reply because the majority of my mental capacity is used trying to re-assure my thoughts and stop myself from shaking. I am posting this looking for people who deal with these same sort of situations in life. I am not really looking for somebody to show me a wikipedia link and to quote a generic psychology book. If you reply I would like to hear real stories, I want to hear that I am not the only one with crippling and self consuming anxiety. Thank you all for helping me relieve my cloudy head, I hope that i can talk to someone and share experiences with anxiety via this post. Benjamin
  7. By Roni Caryn Rabin May 9, 2016 2:30 pmMay 9, 2016 2:30 pm Photo Credit Oliver Munday May 9, 2016 2:30 pm I’m a worrier. Deadlines, my children, all the time they spend online — you name it, it’s on my list of worries. I even worry when I’m not worried. What am I forgetting to worry about? Turns out I’m not alone. Two out of five Americans say they worry every day, according to a new white paper released by Liberty Mutual Insurance. Among the findings in the “Worry Less Report”: Millennials worry about money. Single people worry about housing (and money). Women generally worry more than men do and often about interpersonal relationships. The good news: Everyone worries less as they get older. “People have a love-hate relationship with worry,” said Michelle Newman, a professor of psychology and psychiatry at Pennsylvania State University, who was not involved in the writing of the report. “They think at some level that it helps them.” The belief that worrying somehow helps to prevent bad things from happening is more common than you might think. Researchers say the notion is reinforced by the fact that we tend to worry about rare events, like plane crashes, and are reassured when they don’t happen, but we worry less about common events, like car accidents. But that doesn’t mean all worrying is futile. “Some worry is actually good for you,” said Simon A. Rego, the author of the new report and a cognitive behavioral psychologist who specializes in anxiety disorders and analyzed decades of research on worrying for the paper. “It’s what we call productive or instructive worry, that can help us take steps to solve a problem.” One study published in 2002 recruited 57 young adults and asked them to list their worries in a diary for seven days and rate each worrying episode. When the researchers analyzed the results, they determined that about 20 percent of the worries were about anticipating a negative outcome in the future. But nearly half of all the documented worries reflected a process of problem solving. While that can be constructive, people who worried a lot and couldn’t control their worrying were less likely to find a solution to their problem. The researchers, Marianna Szabo, now at the University of Sydney, and Peter F. Lovibond of the University of New South Wales in Australia, concluded that failing to come up with solutions may actually lead to more pathological worrying. In 2007, the same researchers tried to correlate aspects of worrying with specific components of problem solving, like defining the problem, gathering information, generating solutions, evaluating and choosing a solution. Once again, they concluded about half the cognitive content of the worry episodes included attempts to solve a problem. Once people devise a solution, they quit worrying one-third of the time. But people found it hard to stop worrying if they weren’t satisfied with the solution they came up with. People “get caught up in the worry itself,” Dr. Newman said. “It becomes so habitual, I call it ‘a process looking for content.’” That kind of worrying can get out of hand. “Excessive worriers have multiple domains that they worry about, and if something triggers a worry in one domain, it can seep into other areas,” Dr. Rego said, “and things can move back and forth like wildfires — once one gets going, it can start other fires as well.” Worrying, a cognitive process, should not be confused with anxiety, which generally refers to an emotional state of unease that also includes worry. While 38 percent of people worry every day, most of them do not have anxiety. Generalized anxiety disorder, the primary feature of which is excessive and uncontrollable worrying, affects only 2 to 5 percent of the population. Liberty Mutual Insurance officials commissioned the report to better understand how Americans can “break the worry cycle,” since the insurance business is designed “around helping people live with less worry,” said Margaret Dillon, the company’s executive vice president and chief customer officer for the United States, adding that it could also help them develop the most appropriate products. The report noted, for example, that top worries for people ages 25 to 44 are about finances and housing, she said. If you’re worried about your worrying, the report suggests some coping strategies, including: Divide and conquer Try to come up with a solution to a worrisome problem by breaking it down into four parts: defining the problem, clarifying your goals, generating solutions and experimenting with solutions. Grab a pen and paper and brainstorm, the report suggests.Studies have shown this approach can help ease depression and anxiety. Practice mindfulness Choose a routine activity or part of the day and try to experience it fully. Set aside concerns, and try to be “in the moment.” Schedule a worry session Pick a designated time of day to mull your problems. If a worrying thought enters your mind outside of your scheduled worry session, jot it down so you can think about it during your scheduled worry time. Then get back to your day. Practice accepting uncertainty Notice your thoughts and label them (as in, “there is the thought that I can’t manage”). Let go of tension in your body; soften your forehead, drop your shoulders and relax your grip.
  8. This class of drugs, which includes Xanax and Valium, helps control anxiety and panic attacks. A recent study found 1 in 20 adults received a prescription for benzodiazepines in 2008. By Kirstin Fawcett Feb. 19, 2015 | 10:28 a.m. EST+ More The mere thought of climbing into a car sends Jenn Waterman spiraling into a state of agitation and fear. Waterman, a 30-year-old freelance book editor who lives in Arapaho, North Carolina, survived two near-fatal car accidents as a teenager. Since then, she’s battled post-traumatic stress disorder and panic attacks. Waterman has visited a therapist, and she regularly takes Zoloft, a medication that treats depression, anxiety and other conditions. But the only thing that truly quells her nerves before sliding into a vehicle’s passenger seat, she says, is Valium. “I notice that once I go ahead and take it, I feel so much better – like I can finally relax,” she says. “Sometimes that makes all the difference in the world.” Valium is a medication that’s part of a larger class of drugs called benzodiazepines. Benzodiazepines are commonly prescribed for anxiety and agitation. They can also be used for insomnia, seizures and alcohol withdrawal. Some types of benzodiazepines are instantly recognizable; Ativan and Xanax, for example, have infiltrated popular culture and are now colloquially considered “quick fixes” for everything from poor sleep to panic disorders. But other forms include – but aren’t limited to – the drugs Klonopin and Valium. Benzodiazepines are some of the most common medications in the world; a recent study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health found that about 1 in 20 adults received a prescription for them in 2008. They’re extremely effective for patients like Waterman, who have crippling anxiety. Unlike medications like selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors, which take several weeks to reach full efficacy, benzodiazepines work almost immediately. They can also be good for treating chronic anxiety in patients who have adverse reactions to SSRIs and similar medicines. The drawbacks? Benzodiazepines can be habit-forming. And they carry a host of dangerous side effects – including impaired cognition and mobility in older individuals, and potentially life-threatening withdrawal symptoms in people with severe addictions. A study sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health recently linked long-term use of benzodiazepines to a heightened risk for Alzheimer’s disease. And data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed that benzodiazepines, along with opioid pain relievers, are the prescription drugs most often responsible for emergency department visits and drug-related deaths. So are benzodiazepines helpful or dangerous? Like most pharmaceutical drugs, experts say, they’re a mixed bag. Despite studies suggesting that physicians over-prescribe them, even those in the medical community tend to disagree on whether the benefits of benzodiazepines outweigh the risks. For every doctor who writes a prescription for Xanax, there’s another who refuses to do so, says Jerrold Rosenbaum, chief of psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital. “It’s amazing how polarizing the conversation gets,” Rosenbaum says. "There is a constituency that views [benzodiazepines] as evil and harmful; they tend to come out of the substance use disorder community. They’re not perfect drugs, but they do work for conditions for which nothing else [is as effective].” Benzodiazepines can be safe for short-term use. “Benzodiazapines are very effective, particularly in the short term, for the treatment of acute anxiety and insomnia,” says Larissa Mooney, an assistant professor of psychiatry and director of the Addiction Medicine Clinic at the University of California-Los Angeles. “They calm people down, and they help people fall asleep and stay asleep.” Most doctors say benzodiazepines should not be prescribed for more than a few weeks. The body slowly builds up a dependency to the pills, which can be averted by not taking them for an extended duration. Patients should also make sure to follow their doctor's dosage instructions, and to slowly taper off the medication instead of stopping cold turkey. In some cases, though, long-term use of benzodiazepines can be acceptable, Mooney says. “There are a subset of people who seem to respond very well to long-term benzodiazepines,” she says. “They may be maintained on a low dose and never need anything higher – meaning they don’t develop a tolerance. They may be intolerant to other classes of medications. And it seems to augment their treatment for anxiety.” All of the above are true for Waterman, who has sporadically taken Valium over the years. She sticks to a low dosage, goes periods of time without taking the medicine and says she’s never felt any physical side effects. She’s also had bad reactions to other antianxiety drugs; Valium is the only medicine she’s taken that hasn't produced physical side effects. And while Zoloft helps her anxiety, Valium is more effective at halting her nightmares and panic attacks. Benzodiazepines are not a cure-all. Many people with panic disorder or acute anxiety use benzodiazepines as a first-line method of treatment until they’re able to find another coping mechanism. But they might also have underlying issues that contribute to their anxiety, Rosenbaum says. These problems might be best addressed by tackling life stressors, taking an antidepressant that helps with anxiety or trying cognitive-behavioral therapy. Certain people should not take benzodiazepines – or they should take extra precautions. People with a history of alcoholism or drug addiction are advised against taking benzodiazepines. Similarly, elderly people face an increased risk of falls, cognitive disturbance, sleep apnea and a potentially heightened chance of dementia, says Charles Reynolds, a professor of geriatric psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. However, he says, certain factors that often appear with aging – for instance, bereavement, insomnia and low-grade depression complicated by anxiety – mean benzodiazepines “do have a place in the management of emotional distress in older adults.” In these cases, he says their best bet is a short-acting benzodiazepine prescribed for a limited duration. And it goes without saying, he adds, that anyone taking benzodiazepines should avoid depressants such as alcohol or opioids. Doctors should carefully monitor patients’ use of benzodiazepines. “In most cases of benzodiazepine dependence, addiction begins with a legitimate prescription,” says Tiffany Jones-Rouse, a licensed social worker and substance abuse counselor based in the Baltimore-District of Columbia metro area. “Folks seek intervention for a variety of conditions, from muscle spasms to chronic anxiety disorders, and they're often issued a prescription for Xanax, Valium, Klonazepam, Ativan or another tranquilizer.” These drugs, she says, can be beneficial for people who have never demonstrated drug or alcohol dependence. In this case, their dosage should always be time-limited and closely monitored by a physician who addresses the potential for addiction. The problem, Jones-Rouse says, is that while many physicians impose prescription time limits and address the risks and side effects, others might not. Over time, a patient will sometimes develop a tolerance toward the benzodiazepines. Their negative symptoms will return, and they will either request a larger dosage from their doctors, buy the medicine illegally or turn to another substance, like alcohol. In certain cases, Jones-Rouse adds, people don't recognize that they're dependent until they make the decision to stop taking the medication. They’ll quickly find that they experience uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms such as mood swings, agitation and irritability, and changes in appetite and sleep patterns, among others. In worst-case scenarios, unmonitored benzodiazepine withdrawal can lead to stroke, seizures and heart attacks. And benzodiazepines, when combined with other drugs, can result in overdose and death. It's possible to safely withdraw from benzodiazepines, even after extended use or abuse. According to Jones-Rouse, hospitals and treatment programs provide medical monitoring for the detoxification phase. Therapists, social workers and psychologists trained in dealing with substance abuse can provide longer-term psychological care. And public support programs such as the 12-step programs Narcotics Anonymous and Chemically Dependents Anonymous provide a social support network that aids in recovery. SOURCE: Lloyd Sederer is medical director of the New York State Office of Mental Health, adjunct professor at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and medical editor for Mental Health for the Huffington Post. Follow him @askdrlloyd and visit his website www.askdrlloyd.com. The opinions expressed here are his own However, experts say most physicians agree on the following guidelines – independent of whether or not they themselves prescribe benzodiazepines.
  9. Hi there, Just signed myself up for the first time after years of occasionally wondering if an online support group would help. I was diagnosed with depression over 10 years ago and have responded very well to medications (various SSRI's) and have put a fair bit of work into doing all the "other stuff" (exercise, eating right, sleeping well etc) but I'm still struggling with the need to take medication. I've tried stopping a few times (once cold turkey and you learn that lesson the hard way... don't do it!) and since then a couple of times while taking a program on mindfulness as a relapse prevention tool etc... Over the years I've also realised that while my problem was depression back in high school (I'm now 30), it's anxiety that has stuck and bothers me most now, if I don't take my meds and be very aware of my mood. Basically I'm on a pretty low dose of Celexa and I'm a totally "normal" person as long as I take it and use other strategies that I've learned over the years. My desire to stop taking meds came about mostly because I'm convinced that taking SSRI's has killed my sex drive. I'm in a reasonably long-term relationship, we live together, and I think he's the one I want to marry. I think I had an average sex drive over the years but now it's pretty much the last thing I ever want and has been for a few years now... I worried that it was because my oppinion of myself had dropped over the years and so I didn't want to be seen naked etc except that's not really true. I worried that it was because I wasn't sexually attracted to my boyfriend but despite years of not wanting to have sex with him, I've had no desire to cheat and no attraction to anyone else. And no desire to *********. It's like I'm a 90 year old woman, trapped in the body of a 30 year old (no offense to horny 90 year old) and it's one of the most embarrassing things to talk about, so I don't (which causes all kinds of relationship problems). So I went to my GP and she suggested trying a different medication and switched me to Wellbutrin. I was thrilled that I lost weight almost right away, could concievably have quit smoking, and convinced myself that I was starting to feel slight sexual urges again. Except once the Celexa completely wore off, my anxiety level started to build and I couldn't think properly; the best way to describe this is that it was like my brain had been put in a blender. I don't know if that was caused by anxiety or if my brain just needs more serotonin to function. The other symptom that comes back when I stop taking Celexa is my irritability... what finally convinced me to sign up for this site was going searching for ANYTHING about depression, anxiety and irritability because I just tried to set up my new iPhone, that I've waited forever to get... not being able to get it out of the case and get the SIM card out almost made me throw it against the wall in frustration. WHen I googled the topic, I found a post on this site from a few years ago and it completely describes the way I feel... Becca158 wrote: " I am fine and perfectly calm if on my own, but if I have to go out and eg go shopping I tend to slowly start to get tense and angry. People just seem to wander aimlessley and get in my way. I start screaming in my head "for god sake get out the ****** way" and just stand there, fists clenched. Or if someone doesn't hold a door when they have finished etc again the comments begin in my head. I get aggitated and irritable very easily, if for some reason I am doing my coat up and the zip gets stuck I try once or twice and then I can' t stand it anymore I will physically just rip the thing of and chuck across the room my anger is so fierce. It scares me sometimes. If I am driving and someone cuts me up, I am a lunatic! I used to be calm, but I feel like a frayed peice of rope. My control isn't what it used to be. Even now, when I sit next to my mom in the evenings and she is watching tv, the rustle of her newpaper has my eye twitching and fists clenching and I long to scream at her "be quiet". I don't of course, because that is rude and its not her fault. But I can rationalise myself till I'm blue in the face but I still can't control my temper. When no one is around and something happens I punch walls, kick things. I just wondered if anyone else was like this? I am cheery and cheerful, but quick to temper is someone says something I think is stupid, even if its a valid question. i get angry and think "why are they wasting my time" I don't understand why I am like this. Like I said before i have always had anger issues but the pills to begin seemed to rein in that side of my temper. I do lots of physical activity like go to the gym and go out running and cycling just to try and burn of some of the energy because it feels like a ball of flames trying to consume me. Sometimes its almost like ants crawling up my skins, just everything is an irritation. its not fair on me, but mostly its not fair on others around me." A few people responded but most offered suggestions and like Becca158, I've tried so many of the CBT techniques and other things, I just need to know if other people feel the same way. It makes me cry just writing all of this because I know I'm completely irrational when I'm like this (my beloved cat kept jumping up on my desk when I was trying to fix the iphone and I wanted to just throw him across the room... yet I love him so much it hurts. I also kicked and put a huge dent in my car when I was fighting with my b/f once) and I'm too embarrassed to talk to anyone about it. So now I don't know what to do... it seems like an obvious fix to just start taking the Celexa again and not be anxious or angry (I should mention too that my dad had huge rage issues when I was growing up and used to exhibit the same behaviour so I worry too that it's just learned behavious) but I so badly want to know once and for all if the medications are causing other side effects (ie. preventing me from losing weight and more importantly, ******* my sex drive). I don't know which is worse for my boyfriend, never getting laid or having screaming matches with someone totally raging and irrational. Most of all, it just feels like this is a symptom that no one ever talks about.... it seems like it's becoming more okay to say that you couldn't go to work etc because you were depressed but I feel SO alone with things like the anger/irritability and trouble thinking or processing information. I think I partly just needed to spew all of this and get it out of my system but it's making me feel depressed again that I've worked so hard over the years to manage my depression and now my anxiety, to still be feeling like I'm the only person in the world who gets irrationally angry like this. :o( And so so alone.....
  10. Hi guys, I'm (obviously) new here, but I've been looking for somewhere I can pour out my anxieties without feeling too judged, or judged at all if I can avoid it. I'm female, 29 living in the UK and have suffered depression since a young age. I think I was first aware I was suffering low moods when I was fifteen, but never thought too much about them. As I look back now, I have always had major avoidance issues with people, out of fear of being judged and reprimanded and I just don't work well with strangers. Over the years I've been to university twice and gained two seperate high qualifications, but each has been a dark struggle with wanting to lie in bed, cry and sleep all day. Over the next few years I've yo-yo'd with what I call 'highest highs and lowest lows'. I don't think I'm bi-polar, but let me explain a bit more. On a 'high' day, I consider myself active, functional, chirpy and happy. I don't often have days like these so I find it increasingly neccessary to fake it to those who love me and know me well. I know it's never a good thing, I recently found out. On a low day, I stay in bed, stare at the paint and I find my mind blank and numb. I interact with people but I feel so dead inside, nothing they say has absolutely any impact on me whatsoever. I had a big episode last year, in the middle of march. This was set off by me catching pnuemonia. I worked in customer service at an open window (I think we can all guess where this was...) and the extreme cold in the UK coupled with me constantly going in and out of hot to cold, made my chest and illness worse despite me telling management I was too wheezy to work at the window day after day. The outcome was predictable, I began coughing up blood and spent a considerable time at home, feeling like crud and wishing against hope I could drag myself out of the despair. This year, after limping onward with a mood I could feel getting lower and lower, I began to suffer stomach pains. My boss then fired me without cause and it felt like something in me finally snapped. I don't remember too much, which is probably for the best. I know I made out my will and settled my funeral arrangements. Despite being caught writing the note and frantic calls from my mother to the doctors, I attempted to take my own life. I was seen by an emergency assessor who diagnosed me with 'major depressive disorder' with 'extreme social anxiety'. It's taken them a long time to arrange counselling, almost two months, and in that time I've tried three further times. Each time I've been stopped by someone else. I feel at the end of a long dark road. I haven't showered or brushed my teeth since mid january. I dont think I've even washed my clothes or changed my bedding. I either sleep all day or come down to my desk like a ghost and fill my head with video games and documentaries about people who suffer. I seem to find it soothing watching those. My mother has attempted to lighten my day with aromatherapy and I know it's hard on her, hearing me cry and knowing I get 'out of my mind' sometimes. When I have days of insomnia, I stay awake doing nothing at all. My anxiety is probably even worse; I've never been good with strangers and lately this has become almost crushing. I don't leave the house, I haven't in almost three weeks. I know I have to soon because there is my counselling coming up. The last time I left the house, I tried to brave the outside and hit Asda. The bus journey was deafening in silence, and I was sure everyone was looking at me. I can't help but imagine their eyes boring into my skin and the things they;re thinking about me, the words they're whispering about me. In Asda, with so many people in a tighter space, I could feel the panic starting to rise and I avoided looking at faces, trying not to notice their eyes or their lips and pressing myself against shelves to avoid touch. I was bumped into and I had a full blown panic attack. It felt like my windpipe was closing and no air could get in. My hands were shaking and the blood was pounding in my ears, and I went to my knees and then I blacked out. I haven't been out since. One of my qualifications is as an illustrator, digital. I can't even bring myself to put a pencil onto paper. Art was my greatest passion, now I can't even face it. On a lighter note; I hope one day that I can manage this properly. My aim is to be able to go into a cinema filled with people and sit there alone with them and watch a film. It's nothing grand or fancy, but if I can manage that step one day (hopefully soon) - then I can finally see some light on my road. (ps sorry if this depressed anyone, I'm having such a hard time right now and I'm struggling like mad to cope, thanks xx)
  11. Here is a new idea--actually an old idea that has been around for decades--that works: Transcendental Meditation. By USA Col. Brian Rees (ret.), MD, MPH, David O'Connell, PhD, and David Leffler, PhD Primary treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) such as Prolonged Exposure Therapy and Cognitive Processing Therapy are not proving effective. That's the conclusion of a recent Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) article calling for new ideas. The reality, the article points out, is that some two-thirds of combat veterans with PTSD are unable to free themselves from PTSD symptoms despite undergoing conventional treatments. Here is a new idea--actually an old idea that has been around for decades--that works: Transcendental Meditation. Research has shown that the practice of Transcendental Meditation ™ generates significant reductions in PTSD symptoms and in a short period of time. Examples: In a 1985 study, American Vietnam-era veterans with PTSD who were taught TM experienced major reductions in anxiety, depression, and negative personality traits. Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, taught TM in 2011, had a 50 percent reduction in symptoms within a 3-month period. In a 2013 study of Congolese refugees who had been exposed to civil war, sexual abuse, torture, and/or the brutal slaying of loved ones, 90 percent of subjects improved into a "non-symptomatic" range within 30 days of learning TM and remained that way throughout the more than 4-month monitoring period. A follow-up 2014 study of Congolese refugees showed that major benefits occurred within a mere 10 days of learning TM. The benefits were determined to be larger than those seen with other behavioral and meditation, relaxation or stress management techniques. TM is a cost-effective, easily learned, and effortless mental technique derived from ancient practices in India. It is taught in a systematic, highly structured and standardized manner by highly trained teachers throughout the world. More than 350 peer-reviewed studies, showing positive effects on mental and physical health, have been published in research journals. Based on the science, the American Heart Association has described TM as the only behavioral technique that can be recommended for lowering hypertension. Moreover, research reviews have shown TM to be the most effective behavioral technique in reducing anxiety. Prolonged Exposure Therapy and Cognitive Processing Therapy, conventional treatments used for PTSD, have been described as uncomfortable by many patients because they explicitly address and attempt to help patients process traumatic events and accompanying negative emotions and memories. In contrast, TM is not a therapy per se. Practitioners regularly describe their experiences with it as being pleasant and restful. With TM, negative emotions, thoughts and memories of past trauma are not explicitly addressed. Rather, regular TM practice leads to deep rest and a kind of passive processing of trauma. TM dissolves the deep stresses incurred on the physiological level and lessens identification with the trauma on the mental level. Brain wave activity becomes highly coherent, indicating orderliness and brain integration. Stress hormones such as cortisol, epinephrine and nor-epinephrine, decrease. Measurements of relaxation and well-being, such as serotonin levels, galvanic skin resistance, and immune-modulatory effects, all increase. Although conventional approaches to PTSD can increase one's self-confidence and sense of mastery and provide better coping mechanisms, TM practice apparently goes deeper. It provides a broader spectrum of benefits, including increases in ego development, executive functioning, personality integration, creativity, problem-solving abilities and intelligence--improvements well beyond disorder-specific symptom reduction. Military personnel and veterans are often hesitant to seek PTSD treatment because it could be viewed as a sign of weakness. TM is a self-sufficient technique free from the possible stigma of mental health services. The U.S. Army's Comprehensive Soldier and Family Fitness Program manual recognizes the need for "spiritual fitness." The fundamental damage in PTSD can be seen as spiritual. The individual is faced (over and over again for those tormented by intrusive thoughts and memories) with what seems to be hopelessly discouraging experiences that are irreconcilable with optimism. The Department of Defense and the Veterans Administration have worked hard to address PTSD, but in the United States we have frequently medicalized what is essentially a moral/spiritual injury. Resolution may lie in the benefits generated by something simple and broadly effective such as TM, where individuals can find quick and easy access to inner calm, stress release, and even bliss. With regular practice of just 20 minutes twice a day, tormented souls get measurable psychological and physical benefits--and a real chance to become more peaceful, productive, and fulfilled, and to enjoy more of what life has to offer. Although more high quality research is needed to test TM as a stand-alone treatment as well as an adjunct to conventional and other novel PTSD approaches, we now know from existing studies that the practice works well. Very well. And our veterans should have access to it--and to any other programs that work well. They deserve it. Rees, a former VA doctor, is a graduate of the U.S. Army War College who served in the Army Reserve for 37 years, including five deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. He was the lead author of the two studies on TM for PTSD in Congolese refugees. His most recent book, Detained: Emails and musings from a spiritual journey through Abu Ghraib, Kandahar and other garden spots, was published this month; O'Connell is an author and has been a clinical and forensic psychologist for over 35 years. He most recently edited Prescribing Health: Transcendental Meditation in Contemporary Medical Care (New York, London: Rowman & Littlefield; 2015); Leffler is the executive director at the Center for Advanced Military Science (CAMS). He served in the U.S. Air Force for nearly nine years and has published articles about TM in over 1,000 locations worldwide.
  12. P. T. S. D. – Veterans Sources: HelpGuide: http://www.helpguide.org/articles/ptsd-trauma/ptsd-in-veterans.htm http://www.helpguide.org/articles/stress/stress-relief-in-the-moment.htm Veterans’ Administration: http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/family/ptsd-and-relationships.asp HelpGuide PTSD in Military Veterans Symptoms, Treatment, and the Road to Recovery for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Are you having a hard time readjusting to life outside the military? Are you always on edge, always on the verge of panicking or exploding, or, on the flip side, do you feel emotionally numb and disconnected from your loved ones? Do you believe that you’ll never feel normal again? For all too many veterans, these are common experiences—lingering symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It’s hard living with untreated PTSD and, with long V.A. wait times, it’s easy to get discouraged. But you can feel better, and you can start today, even while you’re waiting for professional treatment. There are things you can do to help yourself overcome PTSD and come out the other side even stronger than before. What is PTSD? Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), sometimes known as shell shock or combat stress, occurs after experiencing severe trauma or a life-threatening event. It’s normal for the mind and body to be in shock after such an event, but this normal response becomes PTSD when your nervous system gets “stuck.” The latest research into the brain shows that there are three ways of regulating the nervous system and responding to stressful events: Social engagement is the most evolved strategy for keeping yourself feeling calm and safe. Socially interacting with another person—making eye contact, listening in an attentive way, talking—can quickly calm you down and put the brakes on defensive responses like “fight-or-flight.”Mobilization, otherwise known as the fight-or-flight response, occurs when social engagement isn’t an appropriate response—such as in a combat situation—and you need to either defend yourself or escape the danger at hand. Your heart pounds faster, muscles tighten, blood pressure rises, breath quickens, and your senses become sharper. These physical changes increase your strength and stamina, speed your reaction time, and enhance your focus. Once the danger has passed, your nervous system then calms the body, slowing heart rate, lowering blood pressure, and winding back down to its normal balance.Immobilization. Immobilization occurs when you’ve experienced a traumatic amount of stress—in combat, for example. The physical danger of war has passed but you find yourself “stuck,” your nervous system unable to return to its pre-stress state of balance. This is PTSD.Who is affected by PTSD? Many military veterans develop symptoms of PTSD. In fact, military service is the most common cause of PTSD in men. Close to 30 percent of Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans treated at V.A. hospitals and clinics have been diagnosed with PTSD. For veterans who saw combat, the numbers are even higher, up to 49%. The more tours you made and the more combat you experienced, the more likely it is that you’ll develop PTSD. But however isolated or emotionally cut off from others you feel, it’s important to know that you’re not alone and there are things you can do to help yourself. What are the symptoms of PTSD in veterans? Symptoms sometimes don’t surface for months or even years after returning from deployment. While PTSD develops differently from veteran to veteran, there are four symptom clusters: Recurrent, intrusive reminders of the traumatic event, including distressing thoughts, nightmares, and flashbacks where you feel like it’s happening again. Experiencing extreme emotional and physical reactions to reminders of the trauma (panic attacks, uncontrollable shaking, heart palpitations, etc.).Extreme avoidance of things that remind you of the traumatic event, including people, places, people, thoughts, or situations you associate with the bad memories. Withdrawing from friends and family and losing interest in everyday activities.Negative changes in thoughts and mood, such as exaggerated negative beliefs about yourself or the world and persistent feelings of fear, guilt, or shame. Diminished ability to experience positive emotions and feeling detached from others.Being on guard all the time, jumpy, and emotionally reactive, as indicated by irritability, angry outbursts, reckless behavior, difficulty sleeping, trouble concentrating, hypervigilance, and an exaggerated start response.Suicide prevention in veterans with PTSD Suicidal thoughts and feelings are common symptoms of PTSD among military veterans. Feeling suicidal is not a character defect, and it doesn't mean that you are crazy, weak, or flawed. If you are thinking about taking your own life, seek help immediately. Please read Suicide Help, talk to someone you trust, or call a suicide helpline: In the U.S., call 1-800-273-TALK (8255).In the UK, call 08457 90 90 90.In Australia, call 13 11 14. Or visit IASP to find a helpline in your country. Self-help for PTSD in veterans While it’s common for veterans with PTSD to have to endure long waits for treatment at the V.A., there are plenty of things you can do for yourself to start feeling better. The job of recovery is to transition out of the mental and emotional war zone you’re still living in and help your nervous system return to its pre-war state of balance. As discussed above, the best way to regulate your nervous system is through social engagement—interacting with another human being, be it a loved one, a family member or a professional therapist. However, as a veteran with PTSD, you need to first become “unstuck” and move out of the immobilization stress response. With these recovery steps, you’ll learn how to deal with your combat stress and also learn skills that can benefit the rest of your post-war life. You’ll learn how to feel calm again, reconnect with others, deal with nightmares and flashbacks, cope with feelings of depression, anxiety, or guilt, and restore your sense of control. And when you do get to see a doctor or therapist at the V.A., you’ll be in a better position to benefit from professional treatment as well. The Road to PTSD Recovery for Veterans, 7 Steps: 1) The road to PTSD recovery step 1: Get moving Getting regular exercise has always been important for veterans with PTSD. As well as helping to burn off adrenaline, exercise can release endorphins and make you feel better, both mentally and physically. However, new research suggests that by really focusing on your body and how it feels as you exercise, you can actually help your nervous system become “unstuck” and move out of the immobilization stress response. Any exercise that engages both your arms and legs—such as running, swimming, basketball, or even dancing—will work well if, instead of continuing to focus on your thoughts as you exercise, you focus on how your body feels instead. Try to notice the sensation of your feet hitting the ground, for example, or the rhythm of your breathing, or the feeling of the wind on your skin. Many veterans find rock climbing, boxing, or martial arts especially effective as these activities make it easier to focus on your body movements—after all, if you don’t, you could get seriously hurt. 2) The road to PTSD recovery step 2: Connect with others Social interaction with someone who cares about you is an effective way to calm your nervous system. For any veteran with PTSD, it’s important to find someone you can connect with face to face—someone you can talk to for an uninterrupted period of time, someone who will listen to you without judging, criticizing, or continually being distracted by the phone or other people. That person may be your significant other, a family member, one of your buddies from the service, or a civilian friend. You may feel like the civilians in your life can’t understand you since they don't know what it's like to be in the military or to have seen the things you have. But people don't have to have gone through the exact same experiences to understand and relate to painful emotions and be able to offer support. What matters is that the person you're turning to cares about you, is a good listener, and is able to be there for you as a source of strength and comfort. If you're not ready to open up about the details of what happened, that's perfectly okay. You can talk about how you feel without going into a blow-by-blow account of events. You can also tell the other person what you need or what they can do to help, whether it's just sitting with you, listening, or doing something practical. Comfort comes from someone else understanding your emotional experience. You’ll also find that people who care about you welcome the opportunity to help. Listening is not a burden for them but an opportunity. How PTSD can get in the way of connecting with others Many veterans find that PTSD can leave them feeling disconnected, withdrawn and, while their nervous system is still stuck, make it tough to connect with other people. No matter how close they are to the person, or how helpful that person tries to be, they just don’t feel any better after talking with them. If that describes you, there are some things you can do to help the process along. Before you’re due to sit down with a friend over a alcohol or coffee, for example, take some time to exercise, as described in step 1 above. As well as calming you when you’re feeling anxious, irritable or on edge, physical movement can also open your nervous system’s pathway to social engagement. Think of it as shaking loose all the blockages to connecting with people. If working out isn’t practical, find a quiet place and take a few minutes before you meet your friend to move around, jump up and down, swing your arms and legs—in other words, flail around like you did as a three year old. A few minutes of that and you’ll be breathing heavily, your head will feel clearer, and you’ll be in a better place to connect. It may sound weird, but vocal toning is also a great way to open up your nervous system to social engagement—even if you can’t sing or consider yourself “tone-deaf.” Again, find a quiet place before hooking up with a buddy and, with your lips together and teeth slightly apart, simply make “mmmm” sounds. Change the pitch and volume until you experience a pleasant vibration in your face. Practice for a few minutes and notice if the vibration spreads to your heart and stomach as well. Other ways to connect with others Many veterans find it helpful to join a PTSD support group or to connect with other veterans or trauma survivors. Listening to others' stories and struggles may help you feel less isolated. You can also volunteer in the community, which can help you feel more connected and useful, especially if you’re not currently working. 3) The road to PTSD recovery step 3: More ways to calm your nervous system Just as loud noises, certain smells, or the feel of sand in your clothes can instantly transport you back to the trauma of a combat zone, so too can sights, sounds, smells, and other sensory input quickly calm you down. The key is to find the sensory input that works for you. Think back to your time on deployment: what brought you comfort at the end of the day? Perhaps it was looking at photos of your family? Or maybe it was the taste of candy in a care package from home, or listening to a favorite song, or smelling a certain brand of soap or cologne? Or maybe petting an animal works quickly to make you feel calm and centered? Everyone responds to sensory input a little differently, so experiment to find what works best for you. 4) The road to PTSD recovery step 4: Take care of your body The symptoms of PTSD can be hard on your body so it’s important to put a priority on sleep, exercise, healthy food, and relaxing activities. You may find it very difficult to relax at first. It’s common for veterans to be drawn to behaviors that pump up adrenaline. After being in a combat zone, that’s what feels normal. Without the rush, you feel strange or even dead inside. Things you may turn to for that familiar adrenaline rush include energy drinks, coffee, drugs, cigarettes, violent video games, and daredevil sports. If you recognize these urges for what they are, you can make better choices that will calm and care for your body and mind. Healthy habits for veterans with PTSD Here are some active steps you can take to improve your PTSD symptoms: Take time to rest and restore your body’s balance. Relaxation techniques such as massage, meditation, yoga, and tai chi are powerful defensive weapons against the symptoms of PTSD.Avoid alcohol and drugs (including nicotine). It can be tempting to turn to drugs and alcohol to numb painful feelings and memories and get to sleep. But substance abuse can make the symptoms of PTSD worse and compound your problems. The same goes for cigarettes.Find safe ways to blow off steam. Pound on a punching bag, pummel a pillow, go for a hard run, sing along to loud music, head to the gym for a vigorous workout, go somewhere private where you can scream at the top of your lungs, or vent in your journal or to someone you trust.Support your body with a healthy diet. Eat plenty of complex carbohydrates, such as potatoes and whole grains, to support mental clarity and physical stamina. Limit processed sugars, which can exacerbate mood swings and energy fluctuations.Get plenty of sleep. Sleep deprivation exacerbates anger, irritability, and moodiness. Aim for somewhere between 7 to 9 hours of sleep each night. Develop a relaxing bedtime ritual (listen to calming music, watch a funny show, or read something light) and make your bedroom as soothing as possible. Use curtains to block outside light and if noise is a problem, try using a sound machine. 5) The road to PTSD recovery step 5: Deal with flashbacks, nightmares, and intrusive thoughts Flashbacks usually involve visual and auditory memories of combat or other trauma you experienced. It feels as if it’s happening all over again so it’s vital for you to accept and reassure yourself that your traumatic experience is not occurring in the present. One effective technique is to state to yourself (either out loud or in your head) the reality that while you feel as if the trauma is currently happening, you can look around and recognize that you’re safe. Here’s a simple script you can use when you awaken from a nightmare or start to experience a flashback or intrusive thought: “I am feeling [panicked, overwhelmed, etc.] because I am remembering [traumatic event], but as I look around I can see that the event isn’t happening right now and I’m not actually in danger.” Other techniques that can be helpful in bringing you back to the present include tapping your arms or describing what you see when look around (name the place where you are, the current date, and three things you see when you look around). Tips for grounding yourself during a flashback If you’re starting to disassociate or experience a flashback, try using your senses to bring you back to the present and "ground" yourself. Experiment to find what works best for you. Movement: Move around vigorously (run in place, jump up and down, etc.); rub your hands together; shake your head Touch : Splash cold water on your face; grip a piece of ice; touch or grab on to a safe object; pinch yourself; play with worry beads or a stress ball Sight: Blink rapidly and firmly; look around and take inventory of what you see Sound : Turn on loud music; clap your hands or stomp your feet; talk to yourself (tell yourself you’re safe, that you’ll be okay) Smell: Smell something that links you to the present (coffee, mouthwash, your wife’s perfume) or a scent that has good memories Taste : Suck on a strong mint or chew a piece of gum; bite into something tart or spicy; drink a glass of cold water or juice 6) The road to PTSD recovery step 6: Work through survivor's guilt Feelings of guilt are very common among veterans with PTSD. You may have seen people injured or killed, often your friends and comrades. You may ask yourself questions such as: Why didn’t I get hurt?Why did I survive when others didn’t?Could I have done something differently to save them? You may end up blaming yourself for what happened and believing that your actions (or inability to act) led to someone else’s death. You may feel like others deserved to live more than you—that you’re the one who should have died. This is survivor’s guilt. Healing from survivor's guilt Healing doesn’t mean that you’ll forget what happened or those who died. And it doesn’t mean you’ll have no regrets. What it does mean is that you’ll look at your role more realistically. Remember, you are only human. The following questions can help you “reality test” your guilty feelings: Is the amount of responsibility you’re assuming reasonable?Could you really have prevented or stopped what happened? Could you really have reacted differently?Are you judging your decisions based on full information about the event, or just your emotions?Did you do your best at the time, under challenging circumstances?Do you truly believe that if you had died, someone else would have survived? Honestly assessing your responsibility and role can free you to move on and grieve your losses. Instead of punishing yourself, you can redirect your energy into honoring those you lost and finding ways to keep their memory alive. And in those cases where you truly believe you did something wrong, you can make amends. Even when you can’t make amends directly, there is always something you can do (such as volunteering for a cause that’s connected in some way to one of the friends you lost). The goal is to put your guilt to positive use, and thus transform tragedy, even in a small way, into something good. 7) The road to PTSD recovery step 7: Seek professional treatment Under the guidance of an experienced therapist or doctor, there are several different types of professional treatment for PTSD available. Cognitive-behavioral therapy or “counselling” involves carefully and gradually “exposing” yourself to thoughts and feelings that remind you of the event. Therapy also involves identifying distorted and irrational thoughts about the event—and replacing them with more balanced picture.Medication, such as antidepressants, is sometimes prescribed to people with PTSD to relieve secondary symptoms of depression or anxiety. While antidepressants may help you feel less sad, worried, or on edge, they do not treat the causes of PTSD.EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) incorporates elements of cognitive-behavioral therapy with eye movements or other forms of rhythmic, left-right stimulation, such as hand taps or sounds. These work by helping the nervous system become “unstuck.” Veterans’ Administration Relationships and PTSD How does trauma affect relationships? Trauma survivors with PTSD may have trouble with their close family relationships or friendships. The symptoms of PTSD can cause problems with trust, closeness, communication, and problem solving. These problems may affect the way the survivor acts with others. In turn, the way a loved one responds to him or her affects the trauma survivor. A circular pattern can develop that may sometimes harm relationships. How might trauma survivors react? In the first weeks and months following a trauma, survivors may feel angry, detached, tense or worried in their relationships. In time, most are able to resume their prior level of closeness in relationships. Yet the 5% to 10% of survivors who develop PTSD may have lasting relationship problems. Survivors with PTSD may feel distant from others and feel numb. They may have less interest in social or sexual activities. Because survivors feel irritable, on guard, jumpy, worried, or nervous, they may not be able to relax or be intimate. They may also feel an increased need to protect their loved ones. They may come across as tense or demanding. The trauma survivor may often have trauma memories or flashbacks. He or she might go to great lengths to avoid such memories. Survivors may avoid any activity that could trigger a memory. If the survivor has trouble sleeping or has nightmares, both the survivor and partner may not be able to get enough rest. This may make sleeping together harder. Survivors often struggle with intense anger and impulses. In order to suppress angry feelings and actions, they may avoid closeness. They may push away or find fault with loved ones and friends. Also, drinking and drug problems, which can be an attempt to cope with PTSD, can destroy intimacy and friendships. Verbal or physical violence can occur. In other cases, survivors may depend too much on their partners, family members, and friends. This could also include support persons such as health care providers or therapists. Dealing with these symptoms can take up a lot of the survivor's attention. He or she may not be able to focus on the partner. It may be hard to listen carefully and make decisions together with someone else. Partners may come to feel that talking together and working as a team are not possible. How might loved ones react? Partners, friends, or family members may feel hurt, cut off, or down because the survivor has not been able to get over the trauma. Loved ones may become angry or distant toward the survivor. They may feel pressured, tense, and controlled. The survivor's symptoms can make a loved one feel like he or she is living in a war zone or in constant threat of danger. Living with someone who has PTSD can sometimes lead the partner to have some of the same feelings of having been through trauma. In sum, a person who goes through a trauma may have certain common reactions. These reactions affect the people around the survivor. Family, friends, and others then react to how the survivor is behaving. This in turn comes back to affect the person who went through the trauma. Trauma types and relationships Certain types of "man-made" traumas can have a more severe effect on relationships. These traumas include: Childhood sexual and physical abuseRapeDomestic violenceCombatTerrorismGenocideTortureKidnappingPrisoner of war Survivors of man-made traumas often feel a lasting sense of terror, horror, endangerment, and betrayal. These feelings affect how they relate to others. They may feel like they are letting down their guard if they get close to someone else and trust them. This is not to say a survivor never feels a strong bond of love or friendship. However, a close relationship can also feel scary or dangerous to a trauma survivor. Do all trauma survivors have relationship problems? Many trauma survivors do not develop PTSD. Also, many people with PTSD do not have relationship problems. People with PTSD can create and maintain good relationships by: Building a personal support network to help cope with PTSD while working on family and friend relationshipsSharing feelings honestly and openly, with respect and compassionBuilding skills at problem solving and connecting with othersIncluding ways to play, be creative, relax, and enjoy others What can be done to help someone who has PTSD? Relations with others are very important for trauma survivors. Social support is one of the best things to protect against getting PTSD. Relationships can offset feelings of being alone. Relationships may also help the survivor's self-esteem. This may help reduce depression and guilt. A relationship can also give the survivor a way to help someone else. Helping others can reduce feelings of failure or feeling cut off from others. Lastly, relationships are a source of support when coping with stress. If you need to seek professional help, try to find a therapist who has skills in treating PTSD as well as working with couples or families. For resources, please see our Where to Get Help for PTSD page. Many treatment approaches may be helpful for dealing with relationship issues. Options include: One-to-one and group therapyAnger and stress managementAssertiveness trainingCouples counselingFamily education classesFamily therapy
  13. P. T. S. D. – Helping Your Child Cope With Traumatic Events Sources: Anxiety & Depression Association of America: http://www.adaa.org/living-with-anxiety/children-and-teens/tips-parents-and-caregivers/help-your-child-manage-traumatic- http://www.adaa.org/living-with-anxiety/children National Institute of Mental Health: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd/index.shtml HelpGuide: http://www.helpguide.org/articles/ptsd-trauma/post-traumatic-stress-disorder.htm KidsHealth: http://kidshealth.org/parent/emotions/feelings/ptsd.html Veterans’ Administration: http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/family/ptsd-children-adolescents.asp http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/family/very_young_trauma_survivors.asp Anxiety & Depression Association of America Help Your Child Manage Traumatic Events Since the terrorist attacks of 9/11, most adults have accepted that we live in a new era of trying times. Tornadoes, hurricanes, and other natural disasters, as well as explosions, and other traumatic events threaten our sense of safety and security, and they occur around the world on any given day. Adults often struggle with the effects of trauma, even though they understand them. But children react differently based on their personality, age, and circumstances. Children rely on the support of parents and teachers to help them deal with their emotions during and after traumatic events. Parents should decide how much information their children can handle. ADAA member Aureen Wagner, PhD, Director of The Anxiety Wellness Center in Cary, North Carolina, offers this recommendation for parents: “Remain as calm as possible; watch and listen to your child to understand how upset he or she is. Explain a traumatic event as accurately as possible, but don’t give graphic details. It’s best not to give more information than your child asks for. Let your child know that it is normal to feel upset, scared or angry. If older children or teenagers want to watch television or read news online about a traumatic event, be available to them, especially to discuss what they are seeing and reading.” These tips are important for children and adolescents of all ages: Reassure them that you’ll do everything you can to keep them and their loved ones safe.Encourage them to talk and ask questionsLet them know that they can be open about their feelings.Answer questions honestly.Protect them from what they don’t need to know.Avoid discussing worst-case scenarios.Limit excessive watching and listening to graphic replays of the traumatic eventStick to your daily routine as much as possible. Most children and teenagers will recover from their fear. But you can watch for these signs of ongoing distress: Difficulty sleepingChange in eating habitsClinginessRe-experiencing the event through nightmares, recollections, or playAvoidance anything reminiscent of the eventEmotional numbing or lack of feeling about the eventJumpinessPersistent fears about another disaster If after a month or so your child is still showing signs of distress, professional help may be indicated. Children who have trouble getting beyond their fears may be suffering from PTSD, or posttraumatic stress disorder. And that’s when it’s time to seek the assistance of a mental health professional. Many effective treatments are available for children and teens. Anxiety & Depression Association of America (Anxiety & Depression In) Children & Teens Anxiety and depression are treatable, but 80% of kids with a diagnosable anxiety disorder and 60% of kids with diagnosable depression are not getting treatment, according to the 2015 Child Mind Institute Children’s Mental Health Report. Anxiety is a normal part of childhood, and every child goes through phases. A phase is temporary and usually harmless. But children who suffer from an anxiety disorder experience fear, nervousness, and shyness, and they start to avoid places and activities. A child who sees a scary movie and then has trouble falling asleep or has a similar temporary fear can be reassured and comforted. But that is not enough to help a child with an anxiety disorder get past his or her fear and anxiety. Anxiety disorders affect one in eight children. Research shows that untreated children with anxiety disorders are at higher risk to perform poorly in school, miss out on important social experiences, and engage in substance abuse. Anxiety disorders often co-occur with depression as well as eating disorders, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and others. With treatment and support, your child can learn how to successfully manage the symptoms of an anxiety disorder and depression and live a normal childhood. National Institute of Mental Health Do Children React Differently (To PTSD) Than Adults? Children and teens can have extreme reactions to trauma, but their symptoms may not be the same as adults. In very young children, these symptoms can include: Bedwetting, when they’d learned how to use the toilet beforeForgetting how or being unable to talkActing out the scary event during playtimeBeing unusually clingy with a parent or other adult. Older children and teens usually show symptoms more like those seen in adults. They may also develop disruptive, disrespectful, or destructive behaviors. Older children and teens may feel guilty for not preventing injury or deaths. They may also have thoughts of revenge. For more information, see the NIMH booklets on helping children cope with violence and disasters. HelpGuide Symptoms of PTSD In Children & Adolescents In children—especially those who are very young—the symptoms of PTSD can be different than those in adults. Symptoms in children include: Fear of being separated from parentLosing previously-acquired skills (such as toilet training)Sleep problems and nightmares without recognizable contentSomber, compulsive play in which themes or aspects of the trauma are repeatedNew phobias and anxieties that seem unrelated to the trauma (such as a fear of monsters)Acting out the trauma through play, stories, or drawingsAches and pains with no apparent causeIrritability and aggression Veterans’ Administration Very Young Trauma Survivors: The Role of Attachment Years ago, little was known about PTSD in infants and young children. Today, we know that trauma and abuse can have grave impact on the very young. We also know how much the attachment or bond between a child and parent matters as a young child grows. This can make a difference in how a child responds to trauma. Below we discuss rates of trauma-related problems in infants and young children, as well as treatment options. How many infants and young children are abused? In the United States, Child Protective Services receives reports on the abuse or neglect of about 5.5 million children in a year. Infants and young children have more risk of abuse than older children. Over one-third of proven reports to child protection services are for children under the age of five years. Further, children are most often hurt or killed from abuse when they are in the first year of life. Over three-quarters of children killed due to abuse are under the age of three years. How do trauma and neglect affect infants and young children? As with adults, following trauma, most children will have some symptoms. Young children may show a fear of strangers or be scared to leave their parent. They might also have sleep problems or bad dreams. Young children may also repeat themes of the trauma in their play. For example, a child who was sexually abused in her bed might play out "dark" bedroom scenes with dolls. They might also be more fussy, irritable, aggressive, or reckless. Young children may lose skills they once had, such as toilet training. They might go back to earlier habits, like sucking their thumb. Very young children may not show the same PTSD symptoms we see in adults. This may be because many of the symptoms of PTSD require that the child be able to talk about what happened. Early trauma affects the child's nervous system. The nervous system is shaped by the child's experiences. Stress over a period of time can lead to changes in the parts of the brain that control and manage feelings. That is to say, stress and trauma early in life can change the brain. This can have long-term effects on physical, mental, and emotional growth. What's more, the impact of early abuse often extends into later childhood, teen, and even adult years. Diagnosing PTSD in infants and young children Although most children have symptoms following trauma, only a few will go on to get PTSD. Diagnosing PTSD in children can be difficult. The definition of trauma that is used to diagnose PTSD is specific. It says that a person must feel fear, helplessness, or horror for an event to be a "trauma." It is hard to say if this happens for a very small child. Young children are often not able to describe in words the event or how they felt about it. For this reason, other ways of diagnosing PTSD have been created for use with children ages zero to three years. What is attachment? Attachment is the connection found in the main relationship in a child's life. Usually it is with his or her caregiver. Children and parents are meant to form attachments with each other. For example, your baby is born knowing how to cuddle and cry, and it causes you to respond. Also, infants like their caregiver's face and voice more than other sights and sounds. The type of attachment between a child and caregiver can affect how a child will relate to the people she or he comes across in life. Why is attachment important when dealing with trauma? A child's main attachment helps him learn to control his emotions and thoughts. When a caregiver's responses are in tune with a child's needs, the child feels secure. The child then uses this relationship pattern as practice to build coping skills. On the other hand, a child who gets confusing or inconsistent responses from the caregiver might be fussy, have a hard time calming down, withdraw from others, or have tantrums. Children also use their caregivers to guide how they should respond to events. Have you noticed how a child sometimes looks at his or her parent to know how to respond? When you stop your child from doing something unsafe, he in time learns to stop himself. So a parent's reaction to trauma affects the child. Through a relationship with their caregiver, children learn how to be in charge of feelings and behaviors, and how to act with other people. Here are some examples: If a caregiver often helps a child manage her feelings, the child can build coping skills. This could lead to better healing for children who go through trauma.A traumatic event might hurt the attachment between a caregiver and child due to strong feelings that get in the way of a good relationship. Sometimes a child can be angry toward her parent for not keeping her safe. Even very young children can have these feelings. Or, a parent might feel guilty about the event and this might affect the relationship.If the caregiver has her own trauma history, her symptoms (trying not to feel, always worried about danger) might get in the way of caring for her child. What kind of help is out there? Child health care settings, doctors, and other health care providers can give support, education, safety planning, and information about treatment.Child and family social services can help caregivers with many issues.In-home nurses and other providers can help new parents provide good care for their young children. They might help with feeding, sleep, safety, or illness.Therapy is needed if relationship problems or PTSD symptoms do not get better. Treatment that involves the caregiver and child together is best for cases with poor attachment and trauma. One such treatment is called child-parent psychotherapy (CPP). CPP helps caregivers understand their children, keep them safe, and give emotional help.For some children, treatment does not take place for many years. No matter the age, when trauma and PTSD are involved, evidence-based, effective treatment exists. Veterans’ Administration PTSD In Children & Teens What events cause PTSD in children? Children and teens could have PTSD if they have lived through an event that could have caused them or someone else to be killed or badly hurt. Such events include sexual or physical abuse or other violent crimes. Disasters such as floods, school shootings, car crashes, or fires might also cause PTSD. Other events that can cause PTSD are war, a friend's suicide, or seeing violence in the area they live. Child protection services in the U.S. get around three million reports each year. This involves 5.5 million children. Of the reported cases, there is proof of abuse in about 30%. From these cases, we have an idea how often different types of abuse occur: 65% neglect18% physical abuse10% sexual abuse7% psychological (mental) abuse Also, three to ten million children witness family violence each year. Around 40% to 60% of those cases involve child physical abuse. (Note: It is thought that two-thirds of child abuse cases are not reported.) How many children get PTSD? Studies show that about 15% to 43% of girls and 14% to 43% of boys go through at least one trauma. Of those children and teens who have had a trauma, 3% to 15% of girls and 1% to 6% of boys develop PTSD. Rates of PTSD are higher for certain types of trauma survivors. What are the risk factors for PTSD? Three factors have been shown to raise the chances that children will get PTSD. These factors are: How severe the trauma isHow the parents react to the traumaHow close or far away the child is from the trauma Children and teens that go through the most severe traumas tend to have the highest levels of PTSD symptoms. The PTSD symptoms may be less severe if the child has more family support and if the parents are less upset by the trauma. Lastly, children and teens who are farther away from the event report less distress. Other factors can also affect PTSD. Events that involve people hurting other people, such as rape and assault, are more likely to result in PTSD than other types of traumas. Also, the more traumas a child goes through, the higher the risk of getting PTSD. Girls are more likely than boys to get PTSD. It is not clear whether a child's ethnic group may affect PTSD. Some research shows that minorities have higher levels of PTSD symptoms. Other research suggests this may be because minorities may go through more traumas. Another question is whether a child's age at the time of the trauma has an effect on PTSD. Researchers think it may not be that the effects of trauma differ according to the child's age. Rather, it may be that PTSD looks different in children of different ages. What does PTSD look like in children? School-aged children (ages 5-12) These children may not have flashbacks or problems remembering parts of the trauma, the way adults with PTSD often do. Children, though, might put the events of the trauma in the wrong order. They might also think there were signs that the trauma was going to happen. As a result, they think that they will see these signs again before another trauma happens. They think that if they pay attention, they can avoid future traumas. Children of this age might also show signs of PTSD in their play. They might keep repeating a part of the trauma. These games do not make their worry and distress go away. For example, a child might always want to play shooting games after he sees a school shooting. Children may also fit parts of the trauma into their daily lives. For example, a child might carry a gun to school after seeing a school shooting. Teens (ages 12-18) Teens are in between children and adults. Some PTSD symptoms in teens begin to look like those of adults. One difference is that teens are more likely than younger children or adults to show impulsive and aggressive behaviors. What are the other effects of trauma on children? Besides PTSD, children and teens that have gone through trauma often have other types of problems. Much of what we know about the effects of trauma on children comes from the research on child sexual abuse. This research shows that sexually abused children often have problems with Fear, worry, sadness, anger, feeling alone and apart from others, feeling as if people are looking down on them, low self-worth, and not being able to trust othersBehaviors such as aggression, out-of-place sexual behavior, self-harm, and abuse of drugs or alcoholHow is PTSD treated in children and teens? For many children, PTSD symptoms go away on their own after a few months. Yet some children show symptoms for years if they do not get treatment. There are many treatment options, described below: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) CBT is the most effective approach for treating children. One type of CBT is called Trauma-Focused CBT (TF-CBT). In TF-CBT, the child may talk about his or her memory of the trauma. TF-CBT also includes techniques to help lower worry and stress. The child may learn how to assert himself or herself. The therapy may involve learning to change thoughts or beliefs about the trauma that are not correct or true. For example, after a trauma, a child may start thinking, "the world is totally unsafe." Some may question whether children should be asked to think about and remember events that scared them. However, this type of treatment approach is useful when children are distressed by memories of the trauma. The child can be taught at his or her own pace to relax while they are thinking about the trauma. That way, they learn that they do not have to be afraid of their memories. Research shows that TF-CBT is safe and effective for children with PTSD. CBT often uses training for parents and caregivers as well. It is important for caregivers to understand the effects of PTSD. Parents need to learn coping skills that will help them help their children. Psychological first aid/crisis management Psychological First Aid (PFA) has been used with school-aged children and teens that have been through violence where they live. PFA can be used in schools and traditional settings. It involves providing comfort and support, and letting children know their reactions are normal. PFA teaches calming and problem solving skills. PFA also helps caregivers deal with changes in the child's feelings and behavior. Children with more severe symptoms may be referred for added treatment. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) EMDR combines cognitive therapy with directed eye movements. EMDR is effective in treating both children and adults with PTSD, yet studies indicate that the eye movements are not needed to make it work. Play therapy Play therapy can be used to treat young children with PTSD who are not able to deal with the trauma more directly. The therapist uses games, drawings, and other methods to help children process their traumatic memories. Other treatments Special treatments may be needed for children who show out-of-place sexual behaviors, extreme behavior problems, or problems with drugs or alcohol. What can you do to help? Reading this fact sheet is a first step toward helping your child. Learn about PTSD and pay attention to how your child is doing. Watch for signs such as sleep problems, anger, and avoidance of certain people or places. Also watch for changes in school performance and problems with friends. You may need to get professional help for your child. Find a mental health provider who has treated PTSD in children. Ask how the therapist treats PTSD, and choose someone who makes you and your child feel at ease. You, as a parent, might also get help from talking to a therapist on your own.
  14. I know a lot of people, including myself, get apprehensive when starting a new medication. Especially if Zoloft is your first antidepressant, you may have fears and questions left unanswered. I stand firmly by: Your doctor or other prescriber is the best person to talk to about this. However, I know how compelling it is to look to the internet for some answers, so I am writing this post to list some common concerns. I am not a medical professional, just a DF moderator trying to help my Zoloft/Sertraline buddies out. All information is taken from the FDA Zoloft Medication Guide, though some of it is put in a more "reader-friendly" fashion by yours truly. If you feel you are in a medical emergency, please dial 911 or go to your nearest emergency room. "I'm freaking out! I didn't feel like this yesterday! What is this?!" ----> DEEP BREATHS, and read on. "When should I get offline and call my doctor right away OR go to the ER?" If you've attempted to commit suicide since starting Zoloft. Whether or not the Zoloft caused the attempt is important, but not as immediately important as your safety right now.If you are acting on dangerous impulses since taking Zoloft. If you've ever heard the expression "don't play with fire", it definitely applies here. If your behavior is changing for the worse and you are doing dangerous things, you must alert your doctor or go to the ER ASAP.If you're feeling agitated,restless, angry, or irritable since starting Zoloft.If you are acting aggressive or violentIf you're having thoughts about suicide or dyingIf you have new or worse depressionIf you have new or worse anxiety or panic attacks. (Note from Christina: When starting an SSRI like Zoloft, some 'start-up' anxiety and panic is fairly common. This DOESN'T change how uncomfortable it is. Let your doctor know about this ASAP, as he or she may add another prescription to ease your symptoms).Trouble sleeping. (Another common start-up symptom that passes for some and lingers for others. Talk to your doctor - they may prescribe a sleep-aid or give you tips on getting a restful night's sleep)An increase in activity or talking, more than what is normal for you (outside of depression)Other unusual changes in behavior or mood. "...OK, any other times that I should get off of Depression Forums and call my doctor right away OR go to the ER?" If you have symptoms of Serotonin Syndrome: Agitation, hallucinations, coma, other changes in mental status; coordination problems; racing heartbeat, abnormally high or low blood pressure; sweating, fever; nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; muscle rigidity. (Important to note: Nausea, digestive problems, and agitation are ALSO on the list of common potential side effects and do not necessarily = Serotonin Syndrome, a rare but potentially fatal condition)If you're having a severe Allergic Reaction: trouble breathing; swelling of face, tongue, eyes, or mouth; rash, itchy welts (hives), or blisters, alone or with fever or joint pain.If you have abnormal bleeding. Zoloft may increase your risk of bleeding/bruising, especially if taken with a blood-thinner like Warfarin or NSAIDS like Ibuprofen/Motrin or Naproxen/Aleve. ("But I take Zoloft and am prescribed an NSAID!" As long as your doctor knows ALL of your current medications (OTC and Rx) and you are not bleeding abnormally, the doctor likely determined the benefits of Zoloft + NSAID outweighed any risks. Talk to your doctor if you're still worried.)If you're having seizures or convulsions I think this goes without saying.Manic EpisodesChanges in weightLow salt (sodium) levels in the blood. <--- The Elderly are at a higher riskIf you experience one of these RARE (but serious) side effects: black or ****** stools, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, eye pain/swelling/redness, vision problems. (Source: WebMD: Zoloft Oral - Uses and Side Effects)Moving On Now... "I stopped taking Zoloft and don't feel right! HELP!" DO NOT stop taking Zoloft or increase/decrease your dose without first talking to your doctor. Stopping Zoloft/sertraline too quickly can make you feel... "crappy", to say the least. The FDA lists several uncomfortable Zoloft discontinuation symptoms: anxiety, irritability, high or low mood, feeling restless, or changes in sleep habits.headache, sweating, nausea, dizziness.electric shock-like sensations, shaking, confusion....and to think, all of this can be avoided by working with your doctor to taper you down off of Zoloft slowly. Please let your doctor know immediately. "OK, I'm done being 100% petrified, so, what are some of the most common Zoloft side effects?" nausea, loss of appetite, diarrhea, or indigestion.change in sleep habits, including insomnia and increased sleepiness.increased sweatingsexual problemstremor or shakingfeeling tired or fatiguedagitationdizziness, drowsiness (Source: WebMD: Zoloft Oral - Uses and Side Effects)drymouth (Source: WebMD: Zoloft Oral - Uses and Side Effects)These are not ALL OF the potential side effects of Zoloft. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that bothers you or does not go away. In the U.S, to report a side effect to the FDA, call 1-800-FDA-1088 , "Is there anything to avoid while taking Zoloft? Where can I find more information?" To read more, visit the FDA's Zoloft Medication Guide (PDF): http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm089832.pdf; WebMD: Zoloft Oral - Uses and Side Effects. End Note SSRI start-up, including Zoloft/sertraline start-up, isn't always fun - even if it's for a good cause. It takes time for the rewards to come, sometimes it feels like at a snail's pace. . But many times, the start-up effects pass as your body adjusts to the medication. I'd like to add that, regardless of what this list says, if you feel like you are in an emergency situation and/or need immediate relief from a severe side effect, call 911 or go to your local ER. Zoloft 'Veteran'? Post the start-up side effects you experienced and whether they passed.
  15. Okay, I'm am physicly healthy 20 year old male who never had bouts with depression/anhedonia before. However, I have always been considered a oversensitive person. About 2 months ago I was I was taking a 60 mg every day (for 2 weeks) of prednisone, along with an antibiotic to treat a spreading rash. During this time I was EXTREAMLY stressed about a girl whom I loved (really my first true love) who wanted nothing to do with me. One day I tried talking to another girl to get my mind off of the girl I loved and EVERYTHING STOPPED. As crazy as it sound I stopped having ANY emotion. No love, happieness, sadness, stress, nervoussness. Simply nothing. I must say that during the time I was stressed and on medication I did drink a little alcohol and smoke an illegal substance (stupid I know, but I was stressed at the time. However I am not a substance abuser). Over time, through exercise and trying to keep up with school and social life even though i had no interest I was SLOWLY getting my joy back. But then, stupid me decided to go out and party/ drink one night only. I FELL into a deep, deep hole of depression after this. I could feel sadness but still no feelings of stress, anger, happieness/joy. Just sadness. I planned out my suicide because of what happend to me. The worst part is knowing that I have such amazing family and friends around me and who love me and I can't love them back. I feel nothing but worthlessness in my life. I am screaming for help to get back to the old me. I just want to know what happend. I know I used to drink alcohol and smoke but that was only occasionaly. Im not abusing anymore substances. I just want to recover. I havent talked to any psychitrists yet but im not sure how well they can help. I am having trouble sleeping now also. I started taking SAM-e because I was told it can help bring back emotions, but its not really helping. WHAT HAPPEND TO ME ANYONE? WILL I STAY LIKE THIS FOREVER!? I JUST WANT MY LIFE BACK. I'M TRYING TO KEEP UP WITH IT BUT MY MIND IS SIMPLY NOT LETTING ME ANYMORE. I'M DEAD INSIDE.
  16. I started this on my Blog and thought it might be fun to do a post as well Sometimes it helps to think of things that we can do instead of all the things we can't do....There are so many rules. Let's free ourselves a bit to do things in life that make us happy, that relieve us of stress and that help us get through. The idea is to start a sentence with "Sometimes it's ok." I'll start.... Sometimes it's ok to eat what you want without guilt. Sometimes it's ok to just spend the day relaxing with no plans. Sometimes it's ok to fart in front of a loved one, especially if that loved one is a pet, lol. Sometimes it's ok to cry. Sometimes it's to...
  17. My insomnia has hit an all time new high, I have to force myself to self every night and I sleep in increments of about thirty minutes and then take me another hour to try to fall asleep. I can't afford to stay up all night and sleep all day because of school & work, so naturally I'm really depressed and so effin anxious; irritated beyond belief. I feel so bad because I'm treating everyone like s*** and snapping constantly. I just want some sleep even if it's five hours I just want it to be five hours straight. I have constant headaches because I'm literally trying to shut my brain down and it's just constantly racing. Should I go back to my p doc and ask if he can prescribe me something so I can sleep so I don't slip back into suicidal depression and anxiety? I really don't want to go back on anti depressants right now, I kind of like feeling my feelings and dealing with them no matter how hard it gets sometimes ya know?
  18. Hello Everyone, You guys have helped me more then you know.Everyday I check in and read posts of people who are thinking and feeling just like me and it makes me feel normal. For some reason lastnight after i returned from my consultation at a Anxiety clinic I felt like im getting back to normal. I went for a consultation for a 18 month program for Anxiety, problem is the price, its very expensive and Ive never been in a program so long. The one I did back in 2005 when I had my last bad spell of anxiety was for 6 weeks, with some CBT and group work. I came home from speaking with the program intake lady and ate a full dinner, Havent done that in two weeks, Went upstairs to my bedroom and watched Tv by myself the whole entire night. Around 630-830 became kind of agitated with feelings like " I feel normal" "Wheres the anxiety" "Is it gone" "Whens it coming back" for some reason I just watched another tv show and the night went on, without a stiff neck, lump in my throat, dry mouth, no sweating and my thoughts calmed down. Now im a little confused, Its my 7th day of meds, I know they say it usually takes about a month to feel the full effects but am i feeling them? Has it stopped? Now I dont know what to do about treatment, Its kind of out of my budget, 400.00 down, and 158.00 a month for 18 months But am i feeling like its gone cause I went and took the next step in making myself feel better?. I dont know what to think. But today dosent feel that bad again, My tummy kind of hurting me, but I keep wondering is it gone, or did me going to see someone about help trigger my mind to stop having those thoughts and feelings or is it the medication working? Need some help guys, Dunno wht to do. Go for treatment and just be poor for 18months not having an extra money and get some therapy and talk to someone since ive had this since i was a young girl, or do i just contiune to take my meds and see how it goes from here as for my thoughts and anxiety and the symptons? Will i just get back to me without therapy? I mean i have in the last couple of years, Didnt need to talk to someone it just stopped coming. Or is it that I didnt need too much of a boost in my brain of the drugs and this is enuff that im recieving right now? Thats making this feel better. I never would of thought that I would feel like this so soon. I dont wanna jinx it, I still feel nervous going out alone a little and going to see my friends but I know I just have to face those demons and do it.
  19. According to many articles, Anxiety and Depression can be linked to poor exercise, and many people see that after a constant work-out routine lasting 1-2 months, they see significant improvement with their symptoms. So if you suffer from anxiety, what type of lifestyle do you lead? -- Angoisse
  20. Start a sentence with "Sometimes it's ok." I'll start.... Sometimes it's ok to eat what you want without guilt. Sometimes it's ok to just spend the day relaxing with no plans. Sometimes it's ok to fart in front of a loved one, especially if that loved one is a pet, lol. Sometimes it's ok to cry. Sometimes it's ok.......
  21. Hi everyone, I've been on Zoloft for a year now, and though it helped my anxiety, I've been feeling pretty flat on it. My doctor has switched me over to Lexapro because it's one of the few anti-depressants that I haven't tried. My doctor has told me to taper off the zoloft and then washing out for a day, and starting on 5mg lexapro and then going up to 10mg and staying on that dose for a few weeks until I review with the doctor in a couple of weeks. I'm studying full time and I'm really worried that weaning off zoloft and then starting up on the lexapro will cause me to have discontinuation syndrome, or that having the two drugs so close together might cause serotonin syndrome. I've had serotonin syndrome before and it was a horrible experience, I simply couldn't function and I was constantly anxious and crying. I really don't want a repeat of it. Has anyone had any experiences of either switching between the two or being on Lexapro that are positive? At a minimum, if the Lexapro can help both my depression and anxiety then I'll be better able to deal with my other problems. Thanks in advance :)
  22. Hello All, Reading through all of your posts and replies I am moved by the kindness of perfect strangers who are willing to share their experiences and support. The title kind of sums up my situation… I am in my early 30’s and have struggled with anxiety and depression since late adolescence/early teens. About 6-8 months ago I got off the medication (venlafaxine) It was the last stop on a train of various similar meds for over a decade. Felling like a slave, and tired of sexual, and other side effects... I wanted to face myself for the first time in a long time with the hopes I had developed tools to overcome my anxiety/depression that I lacked years back when I started meds… I followed a careful withdrawal over 6 weeks. As I am sure many of you know, the withdrawal was torturous once I finally stopped… Once I got out of he woods I swore I would never go back. I experienced a few months (give or take) of normalcy and I dare say “confident happiness.” Healthy diet, exercise, hope, and I immersed myself in the task of taking control of my life, health, and future. I am not sure If I ever felt better. It didn’t last… I tried natural remedies, etc… nothing really made a dent. So here I am… As much as I am conflicted on the topic, I fear medication is a must at this point. I have tried everything to avoid it and I am out of options. I have literally ground to a halt… Professionally and personally, I almost don’t exist at this point. I am looking for a Psychiatrist and it is frustrating! My therapist reccomended a few and ss of today, the soonest appointment available is 6 weeks from now! My primary care would prescribe an SSRI or something in a blink, but I am leery. So I know I have rambled a bit more than is intended in this section so I will leave it there and simply say thank you all for sharing and I look forward to learning from your experiences. Its nice to feel a little less alone in this. J
  23. Hi, I have been on Pristiq for 3 weeks now. Lots of side effects that have not subsided yet (spaced out, very tired and wired at the same time, anxiety and tremors, headaches, palpitations). Some days are better than others and on those days I have a bit of hope as far as my depression/bipolar goes. But the past few days I have been in a much deeper depression and I am losing hope again. The side effects are bad as well. My questions are: Is it possible that the med simply has not kicked in yet? Is there hope that it might? Is 3 weeks long enough to know? and Is it possible for these side effects to diminish? Any responses are welcome and appreciated! Thanks, Jen
  24. Hi everyone. I'm new to the forum and not really sure where to post. I'm asking that people anyone who would be kind enough to give some insight will. I will so appreciate your help! This is going to be some what long but I will do my best to short as much as I can. Our story. I'm a girl. The problem is my boyfriend. We are both in our thirties. He has been married twice and had two horrible divorces. I myself had been married twice. I was married when I met my now boyfriend. Dont judge please. My marriage had had many problems along the way and I did allow myself to fall hard for my boyfriend. He lives with his parents due to after the divorce trying to get back on his feet. I live alone with my two very well behaved teenage daughters. My boyfriend and I have been together for roughly a year and half. He told me right off that he was ADD/OCD. I really never met someone who was. I really didnt know everything to know about it. I'm trying to learn. So when we first met we had very strong feelings for each other. We had been together roughly two months and things got shakey. He said he needed some time. I freaked. Thought he was just using me or I was a fling for him. The more I pushed to figure out what was wrong the more upset he got and was very mad. He basically didnt want to see me, or talk to me just wanted me to leave him alone. I could not understand this. And all of it was like a flip of a switch. So after about a month and half he sends me a message and said he needs me. I went to him. He said I love you, and I wanted to talk to you for about a month now. Now during this whole time begining to end he would tell me I love you. That never changed. So that day we talked, cried and basically got back together with the understanding he is a trainwreck and Its going to be a rollercoaster. I said I'm willing to try if you are. So Things started out slow. It was hard for me to trust him. About a month and half later I left and filed for a divorce. I'm living freely and happy with my choice. So now, he would vist and call, text said he was happy, I was happy. But he would never spend the night and I couldnt understand that one either. He would never give me a reason. As time went on we would nap together in bed and have sex. He sometimes had problems keeping an erection or if he did it wasnt all the way hard. Sometimes sex was difficult for him and I know he was upset. I tried to make him know, I love him anyway. The summer came, I met the family seemed everything was great. We spent as much time together as we could. Then Christmas and Thanksgiving came. It was great. We bought each other presents had the holidays with his family and I was so happy. New years came we celebrated. Then I had noticed that the text were getting fewer. I thought no biggie, he had had alot of stress at work. This was usually when he would text due to his schedule. Then a little later, he all of a sudden said he was in bad mood. I asked why like I thought anyone would with someone they love. I got IDK. I asked is it me? IS it us? He says why is it always about me or us? Then started the whole I want to me left alone thing. He missed my birthday, but did send a text. We talked occasionally and he'd always say hes commited to me and our relationship, that he knows he loves me with all of his heart, hes trying, he doesnt want anyone else. just needs time to get his head straight. Its been almost a month and half and I've seen him maybe 4 very short times. One was intimate. I ask him alot of questions cause I need answers. I get alot of IDK, Im sorrry. But he always tells me he loves me and said he wouldnt cheat or I'm not a fling (all questions I have asked him). I couldnt figure anything out so I talked to his parents. Mom didnt seem to notice anything. Dad thought that we had been fighting. Said its not usual for his son to stay home so much. Told me that our son is strange if you havent noticed which made me very mad. Yes he is hard to figure out. Mom did say he never talked about stuff. The more you push the more he'd back up like a turtle in a shell. So one time I asked him all the stuff your feeling in your head, is this? IS it that? Basically he said its anxieties. I asked him if its from ADD/OCD he said yes. My question is I know we love each other. I know he's afraid of marriage says he will never do it agian. And trust me I have heard stories. I dont know the ex wives side but he was abused too. But everytime this happens he runs. He doesnt want to see me and doesnt want to talk to me. Occasionally will say I love you, I'm trying or something. But can be days. I'm not use to that. However he goes to work, He goes to church and does some body training with a friend. So it seems I'm the only one that isnt seeing him. I have to admit hes not been going out as much tho socially with friends. Even his dad said so. I love this man, I have changed my whole life to be with him. He knows all of this. He says hes not going anywhere just needs time. This is ripping my heart out. And I dont want to offend anyone but It just seems mean and cold and heartless. It makes me think he is just using me, that I'm blind and dumb and hes mean. I dont want to feel that way, I am trying to learn what he's going thru also. I've asked him so many times to talk with me. He wont. He does do CBT but I was told its for anger management, and I believe there is more to that. I dont know that it helps him tho. He does group settings and he isnt one to talk to people. I dont think he does any meds either. And no I cant suggest anything to him cause of his anger. I'm sorry its so long, I'm lost, hurt and I have tried so hard. Its been a month and half now, I dont know how much stronger I am. I feel broken. Please help.
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