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sabishikunaru

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  1. Like
    sabishikunaru got a reaction from Epictetus in What's your favourite 'depression busting' activity?   
    ASMR (mostly to help me sleep, but it can also be uplifting)
    learning/expanding knowledge (nonfiction books/blogs/podcasts/tutorials/free courses online)
    gaming (the more immersive the better; like sober4life said)
    fiction (endearing characters + compelling narratives occupy heart and mind;)
    cleaning (exceptional outlet for times I'm angry, but any time I have the energy it will lift my mood)
    walking outdoors with specific purpose and destination (wandering is very depressing to me)
    online social interactions* (fandoms and forums, largely)
     
    *I've thought about it and I think in-person and online social interaction are both beneficial in different ways, with each having their own drawbacks. It's better to have both if you can, imo. I wish there was more open and honest exploration of these topics rather than all the shaming and invalidation of folks looking to connect with others online, yet I rarely ever see such a thing from a mainstream source.)
     
     
    Love the LP analogy. :)
  2. Like
    sabishikunaru reacted to 20YearsandCounting in Adhd, A Big Scam?   
    DF is a place for respecting issues other people struggle with. 
    Declaring certain mental illnesses or struggles to be  'illegitimate' is disrespectful, regardless of the language that is used.
  3. Like
    sabishikunaru reacted to samadhiSheol in Adhd, A Big Scam?   
    Actually, I've been think like this for sometime now.
    This aside, I've been thinking that most of our mental health problems could actually make sense if looked upon from a different perspective.
    Many if not all of the mental health issues could be seen as reactions to living in a world not all of us are equipped to live in.
    I remember reading of humans still being fundamentally hunter-gatherers in essence. We haven't changed biologically that much in the past 60-80 000 years. People lived in smaller collectives and perhaps without a mind so obsessed with itself. Our sense of belonging and how people see themselves has apparently changed dramatically since then.
    Agriculture, urbanisation and people staying in one place for sustenance and survival has only been around 10 000 years or so.
    So during the last 10 000 years humanity has had to come to grips with a radical change of diet and  living a completely different way of life our bodies are essentially hardwired to adapt with.
    So  for me it makes sense to think some of us are in constant "flight or run" state of mind. Perhaps it's harder for some of us to adapt to contemporay life because of this.
    And this brings me to another reason why I think the way we think of mental health (issues) is a bit onesided.
    Who is truly normal? How is a sense of "normal", "average" behaviour defined? The fact that some of us need medication to be "normal" doesn't really make sense. The multifaceted (and everything but perfect) societies we live in makes it impossible to define "normal", in my opinion at least.
    I don't get it, not at all.
    Probably one of the reasons I'm here.
  4. Like
    sabishikunaru reacted to Fizzle in Adhd, A Big Scam?   
    I am very influenced by having a godson that is totally incapable of functioning in relationships or in school without meds (inattentive ADD)  but meds have allowed him to develop both and have some self esteem and feelings of effectiveness in the world. Of course it doesnt solve the problem at source but it has minimised the harm caused to his life. He is lucky enough to have tutoring and specialist mentoring which helps but without th meds it is still an impossible thing for him. The obvious effect on him is calmness and clarity and he certainly doesnt appear stimulated in the sense mentioned here.  His brother is a year younger and has been brought up exactly the same way and has zero of these issues. He is probably the opposite.  This is not intelligence related as they both have high IQs. 
     
    I think its possible that general inattention habits or lack of interest are being confused for proper ADD here. Its sounding a little similar to people saying everyone is depressed and people should just get on with it and not take meds. Meds are not an absolute or suit all with either condition but I think its important to differentiate between normal behaviours and clinical conditions. 
  5. Like
    sabishikunaru reacted to Circle in Adhd, A Big Scam?   
    Meth gets broken down into amphetamine eventually after it penetrates deeper into your brain. It's like 2-3x as potent as adderrall per mg, but street meth nowadays is often many different analogues. An amphetamine is an amphetamine though despite the differences....
    But you don't smoke your meds, and your meds dont have leftover acids that heat up and swirl around your teeth. And without the methyl group plus the time release, it doesn't hit your brain so hard so probably wouldn't cause as much damage... Not sure the ratios on all that but they have very similar affects..
  6. Like
    sabishikunaru reacted to mil in Adhd, A Big Scam?   
    Hello! ADHDer here, in the flesh. This is a very interesting topic!! I struggle with ADHD every day and it is distressful and anxiety-inducing. It is the reason I developed depression, unfortunately. 
    First off, let me start off by saying the biased lean against mental illness (like the use of the political cartoon that also implies social anxiety does not exist), unsourced claims (for example dopamine deficit is not linked to ADHD although brain scans prove otherwize), and broad examples given against the validity of ADHD makes this article a bit offensive. Well, to me, at least. 
    I specifically want to address two things:
    ADHD cannot be proven and the danger of its medications.
    The first argument has no foundation. Mental illness is unlike physical illness. You cannot point and identify a mental illness in a physical lab test. There are misdiagnosises for every common mental illness. This doesnt disqualify every other mental illness. Yes, ADHD is missiagnosed often, but mis/overdiagnosis does not mean it's some myth that can be blamed on America's poor diet or lazy kids or boring adults. ADHD isnt even exclusive to the US. And the book about ADHD being fake's observations are also very strange to me because I highly doubt such a large quantity of people have the same symptoms if it really is just a combination of other mental issues, or if it's because kids are eating too many Twinkies and too few apples.
    Secondly, just about every medication has sife effects, but they are usually truly dangerous when taken unnecessarily. ADHD medications lead to addiction because people use them disproportonately, without good reason, or because of a misdiagnosis. It is the same with other brain pills. Meds like Ritalin are dangerous because its similar components to illegal drug are what's supposed to balance levels of dopamine, but extra dopamine is not needed if the brain already has a normal amount. If ADHD was not real nor linked to lack of dopamine the medication would not be efective therefore recalled. And this whole "adhd is a buisiness scam" does not work, because corruption behind medication manufacturers happens with others too, for example Lorazepam, I believe, which treats anxiety (which is also very real). 
     
  7. Like
    sabishikunaru got a reaction from Mark250 in Room 101 - Choose 3 Things To Erase Forever   
    Yes it is, but it also relied on its reader having a sense of compassion and believing in justice. As prescient as his book was, even Orwell didn't try to make room 101 sound cute enough to be discussed by the masses. If I recall correctly, that was only pulled off with the "Big Brother" concept itself, within the book.
     
    That some people wilfully choose to remain ignorant (of important matters), or worse -- to force others to remain ignorant through no choice of their own -- saddens me more than I can describe.
  8. Like
    sabishikunaru reacted to Dolphin2013 in Wellbutrin OTC in Canada   
    I've taken Wellbutrin to and from Canada, just my prescription--and have never had a problem. I have also taken Xanax to Canada and to France--again, just my prescription, but no one considers it an issue, I guess.
    I've also traveled from Canada with OTC pain medicine that contained some codeine, if I recall correctly. It was like Tylenol, with caffeine and codeine. Weird combination and no one stopped me at passport control into the U.S. (Sorry for the boldface type, my computer is giving me problems!)
     
  9. Like
    sabishikunaru got a reaction from Dolphin2013 in Wellbutrin OTC in Canada   
    Hi there dupius, sorry I've been away from the forums a while.
    I don't think (at least as far as I know) there's any concern about people trying to get "high" on it. Just typical controlled substance procedures they have for any prescription drug. What I was suggesting, though, is to see if you can get a real, bricks-and-mortar Canadian pharmacy to communicate directly with your existing doctor/psychiatrist. I would think that as long as the prescription can be verified, you should be able to get it filled.
  10. Like
    sabishikunaru got a reaction from Dolphin2013 in Wellbutrin OTC in Canada   
    Although the administration of health care (and associated regulations, presumably) is technically handled separately by each province, I'd highly doubt you could find over-the-counter Wellbutrin, considering the risk of seizures and all. Have you looked into just taking your prescription in? Maybe call a pharmacy you'd like to visit and ask them if they can call your doctor long distance. Larger chains like Shopper's Drug Mart have pharmacy assistants answer the phone who would likely be able to answer your general questions.
    *edit* btw, welcome to the forums. I hope you'll find this useful for whatever you need. :)
  11. Like
    sabishikunaru got a reaction from scienceguy in Social Phobia,   
    For myself I notice it has a lot to do with certain factors. My level of concern gets tangled up in a bunch of intertwined factors that either enhance each other or cancel each other out. Some of them include who I'm around (somehow I'm fine around brand new ppl or most ppl I've known a long time, but acquaintances I've recently met and certain specific people I've had a history of bad experiences with are hugely triggering). If I haven't slept well/eaten well or if I've otherwise stressed myself out somehow, then I'm far more prone to being easily offended or irritated. If I'm called upon to do something else, I get annoyed and have trouble hiding it. If I'm being watched while doing something I get caught up in a mental loop of how they misunderstand me as not knowing the things I mess up on when actually I know the thing very well and it's just that my working memory is often very poor. On stimulating medications I seem to effortlessly avoid being so oversensitive though.
  12. Like
    sabishikunaru got a reaction from Fizzle in Social Phobia,   
    For myself I notice it has a lot to do with certain factors. My level of concern gets tangled up in a bunch of intertwined factors that either enhance each other or cancel each other out. Some of them include who I'm around (somehow I'm fine around brand new ppl or most ppl I've known a long time, but acquaintances I've recently met and certain specific people I've had a history of bad experiences with are hugely triggering). If I haven't slept well/eaten well or if I've otherwise stressed myself out somehow, then I'm far more prone to being easily offended or irritated. If I'm called upon to do something else, I get annoyed and have trouble hiding it. If I'm being watched while doing something I get caught up in a mental loop of how they misunderstand me as not knowing the things I mess up on when actually I know the thing very well and it's just that my working memory is often very poor. On stimulating medications I seem to effortlessly avoid being so oversensitive though.
  13. Like
    sabishikunaru reacted to scienceguy in Social Phobia,   
    I had almost all these problems until I was about 22 or 23 thats a big reason for my depression,being mad on missing out on stuff as a teenager.it mostly went away after I forced myself to be a cashier and talk to every single customer until I had no anxeity It took thousands of conversations for about a year till most of it went I managed to go to a few parties where I didn,t know anyone managed to give alot of presentations and barley got nervous went on a few dates where I felt no nerves at all.I don,t have trouble talking to people m usually the person who breaks the akward silence.I was a full blown agrphobic at one point I didn,t leave my for no more then a few times a year.if I could get better I think everyone else can to,I noticed once I got over it I became a very very angry person,I feel like social anxiety might be some kind of suppressed rage that people are afraid to express for some people atleast I hope you all get better.
  14. Like
    sabishikunaru reacted to Forum Admin in Social Phobia,   
    A. A marked and persistant fear of one or more social or performance situations in which the person is exposed to unfamiliar people or to possible scrutiny by others. The individual fears that he or she will act in a way (or show anxiety symptoms) that will be humiliating or embarrassing.
    B. Exposure to the feared social situation almost invariably provokes anxiety, which may take the form of a situationally bound or situationally predisposed Panic Attack.
    C. The person recognizes that the fear is excessive or unreasonable.
    D. The feared social or preformance situations are avoided or else are endured with intense anxiety or distress.
    E. The avoidance, anxious anticipation, or distress in the feared social or preformance situation(s) interferes significantly with the person's normal routine, occupational (academic) functioning, or social activities or relationships, or there is marked distress about having the phobia.
    G. The fear or avoidance is not due to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g. a drug of abuse, a medication) or a general medical condition and is not better accounted for by another mental disorder.
    -JKM
  15. Like
    sabishikunaru reacted to chromatic_waltz in Myers-Briggs Personality Types   
    I've taken many of these test from several sources and I always get one of two things; INTP, or ISTP. Luckily one of the tests showed a percentage and after taking it a few times over the course of a couple days it showed consistently that I'm am 50/50 sensing and intuitive.
  16. Like
    sabishikunaru got a reaction from Fizzle in Myers-Briggs Personality Types   
    I've been positive I'm INTP for some time now, but I do lean INfP at times. Societies usually expect women to be Fs and men to be Ts, so those of us on the opposite end of things might tend to end up in the middle.
    It is possible to get a different result if you answer based on how you behave/feel when depressed. You might even get the completely opposite of your real type!
    {For anyone confused about how to answer some questions: it's easier to narrow things down if you consider what you would tend to *prefer* doing, rather than focusing on what you would actually do, in order to avoid identifying yourself by a role you play at school, in the workplace, or in particular social situations. Ps for example have to be J to function at most jobs. Male Fs might pretend (or even believe) they are Ts in order to fit in with other men and naturally, female Ts might imitate Fs. Etc., etc. The best way to know what you are is to think "selfishly" and answer with your deep down, personal leanings (even if they're only slight they're probably there), without any regard for social situation/context.}
  17. Like
    sabishikunaru got a reaction from Fizzle in Things People Have Said To You That Have Helped You . . .   
    Ah ha, so it seems I wasn't far off in my guess. Can you suggest any resources for further information about this? Who coined that terminology and are there specific strategies for expanding people's perception of available options? In my case it's more a matter of prioritization and organization that make it hard for me to figure out if an alternative is realistic, but I'm sure I could benefit from any established structures in place for helping people explore their options. In fact that's a kind of support I've wished I could have for a while now).
  18. Like
    sabishikunaru got a reaction from Fizzle in Things People Have Said To You That Have Helped You . . .   
    Interesting, but what are "rescue factors" if I may ask? Does it just mean to search for a reasonable/plausible way out of one's current troubles, or is it something more technical than that?
  19. Like
    sabishikunaru reacted to Epictetus in Things People Have Said To You That Have Helped You . . .   
    In reply to Sabishikunaru...
     
    My understanding [and I am far, far far from being an expert!] is that rescue factors includes physical and psychological solutions to situations that seem hopeless.
     
    -- Often one is confronted with a problem for which there is but one solution, an awful solution.  Sometimes [?] it is possible to find an alternative.  Sometimes there are two awful alternatives and a third solution can be found:  For example:  "One MUST do x or y and one discovers the possibility of doing z."
     
    -- A so-called famous rescue factor proposed in CBT is the disappear meditation.  "Imagine one is kidnapped and marooned on a desert island.  Before this, one was bogged down with the various demands and expectations of countless people.  Suddenly one is no longer around.  What will happen?  Will the world just end?  Or will people someone get on without you because you suddenly vanished?  The demands and expectations of others will still be there.  But you are no longer there to meet or fulfill them.  Those needs will be met by others or not.  But life will go on.  People will find alternatives and substitutes.  "Supposedly" this meditation is designed to help a person see that not all matters are matters of life and death and that "sometimes" it is possible to attach a stressful "life or death importance" to matters which are not really life of death.  This might [?] be an example of a psychological rescue factor.  The meditation is not designed to encourage hard-heartedness though.  Its focus is on unrealistic expectations and demands. 
     
    --A physical rescue factor might be finding a physical alternative to something.  For example, "I" must do this might sometimes only mean "someone" must do it.  For example.  "You must take me to the airport."  Actually, you want or need to go to the airport and you or someone else must take you:  a friend, a relative, a taxicab.
     
    --A rescue factor could be just looking at a problem in a new way.  Instead of "This is a problem,"  "why isn't this a problem?"  For example, I have an incurable disease, but I still have my eyesight and hearing, can still appreciate nature and beauty and music, have both hands and feet, am not starving to death."  Stuff like that. 
     
    That is my very shallow and very imperfect understanding of what "rescue factors"  are.  Sorry I couldn't be more helpful. 
  20. Like
    sabishikunaru reacted to HyperionMaster in Things People Have Said To You That Have Helped You . . .   
    In the hospital there was a sign saying "if you're a cat be a great cat not a mediocre bird" or something like that.
  21. Like
    sabishikunaru reacted to BlackEyedDog in How Do I Get The Courage To Apply For A Job?   
    I need to find a job soon, but the thought of applying in person scares the h*** out of me greatly. I think the fear of leaving my home and going out into the unknown bothers me greatly combined with the interaction with complete strangers. Does anyone have any tips to help me get over this psychological hurdle in regards to applying for a job? Any insight or knowledge would be greatly appreciated.
  22. Like
    sabishikunaru reacted to allalone6 in Teeth Suffered Cause Of Your Depression?   
    I finally got up the courage to make the appointment! only took 5 months! appointment is next week! very anxious about it!
  23. Like
    sabishikunaru got a reaction from Fizzle in Teeth Suffered Cause Of Your Depression?   
    Can you post an update in this thread? I've gone through similar, and while I've had reasonably good dental habits for a while now, I'm probably going to have to go in for cavities sooner or later.
  24. Like
    sabishikunaru got a reaction from Fizzle in Things People Have Said To You That Have Helped You . . .   
    I've been thinking about this idea lately myself. Like how anxious people can be the safest people to be around because they sense danger the fastest (and/or can anticipate negative outcomes and prepare for them), depressed people can also do similar things that are useful for planning/avoiding hardships. Obviously there's still a lot of struggle involved but it's possible that on better functioning days, a person can learn to use the insight anxiety and depression bring to help plan for contingency.
  25. Like
    sabishikunaru got a reaction from Epictetus in Things People Have Said To You That Have Helped You . . .   
    I've been thinking about this idea lately myself. Like how anxious people can be the safest people to be around because they sense danger the fastest (and/or can anticipate negative outcomes and prepare for them), depressed people can also do similar things that are useful for planning/avoiding hardships. Obviously there's still a lot of struggle involved but it's possible that on better functioning days, a person can learn to use the insight anxiety and depression bring to help plan for contingency.
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