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chrisnos

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About chrisnos

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  1. Hey guys, A lot of times when I'm depressed I look to motivational and inspirational quotes to find help, to make myself believe, find the strength to keep going, and reinvigorate our emotional state in those moments where we feel like there's no hope left. I created a 2 minute slideshow of motivational and inspirational quotes as a pick-me-up for anyone going through tough times as a way to help others find hope, restore your faith, and find the strength to keep going when times are tough as a way to restore hope and faith inside someone. Please share this this with others on Facebook and Twitter, as it could give someone the strength to keep going one more day, or could even save a life. Also subscribe to get more videos as I create them!
  2. Fizzle, It's not about eliminating emotions - I went through a stage where I confused this - it's about having control on them, so you can get rid of the ones that are destructive. We know this intuitively, we say phrases like "I can't live with myself" and "I feel like I'm wrapped in a blanket of sadness" - we know it's not something we are, but rather something we watch in front of us like a television program that we react to as we see it in front of us. If someone attacked me verbally, where is the "anger" or "sadness"... does it jump out of the words onto the person? And why can some words hurt one person but not another? This is like calling a 6-foot tall woman short. Nobody else's words ever hurt you - all they do is bring to conscious awareness your own insecurities. For example, the reason the 6-foot tall woman wouldn't feel sad, angry, upset or insecure is because she doesn't believe it in herself. But, if she did believe she was short, and that this was a bad thing, no matter what the reality (even if she was 6-feet), someone attacking that insecurity would make her feel bad, regardless of reality. When someone attacks me verbally, it's something I need to work on inside myself by observing "there is sadness inside me" and that it exists nowhere else, and eventually as I realize that is not me ("I can't live with this unhappiness), almost like a separate entity just coming and going, I can just observe it without thinking it is me or getting involved with it. While most people, even having been in therapy for years, are kept in the dark and under this illusion, which stops them from making progress, but once you realize the truth about how things work you gain clarity, like being in a dream and realizing the monster has no power over you after you realize you're dreaming, because you realize the illusion and that it really has no power over you.
  3. Mikayla, Like anything it takes practice to re-wire your way of thinking, and it's my fault for not explaining this correctly maybe, but in saying it's saying how I feel. The information and exercise are a complete picture, that's why I was saying when you go to sleep this "observer" shuts down. Because YOU don't feel anything - this consciousness, this observer, just watches these feelings come and go, but we misidentify and think we are our thoughts and feelings, and this is what makes us believe our emotional state is a permanent fixed think because it's a part of who "we" are, when in reality it's just a passing activity you observe.
  4. A lot of it is a story we tell ourselves… if you think about a moment ago, or a moment after this, there is no depression, no anger, no anxiety – nothing, it’s all happening now. I used to feel that way. I realized eventually it was all about presence. One night I was feeling like I wanted to die and thought, "I can't live with myself anymore". At that moment I realized there was a part of me (that part that observes when I'm awake and stops when I'm asleep) that was observing and watching everything happened. At that point I realized I wasn't my emotions, that they were only occurring in the present moment, and I could watch without getting involved - like watching my emotions like something separate that was on a TV in front of me. Then I just narrated what I was watching, as if I was watching clouds passing by, and said "there is sadness inside me" or "there is anxiety inside me" or "there is anger inside me", and I realized the more I said this the more I detached from my emotions, and they no longer held any power over me, because they weren't me, but something I observed like clouds passing in front of me (if that makes any sense). Basically, once you see through the illusion you can take control over your emotions, because they can no longer play their “game” and control you.
  5. I got out of bed, ate, and wrote a post on this forum... there are people out there who can't do any of these things and I was reminded of how grateful I am.
  6. Sounds clever...only...you should explain it to my neurons...that part about happiness.:))) Hope you'll do. ThanksLol I like the challenge, I'll give it my best shot... I used to feel that way. I realized eventually it was all about presence. One night I was feeling like I wanted to die and thought, "I can't live with myself anymore". At that moment I realized there was a part of me (that part that observes when I'm awake and stops when I'm asleep) that was observing and watching everything happened. At that point I realized I wasn't my emotions, that they were only occurring in the present moment, and I could watch without getting involved - like watching my emotions like something separate that was on a TV in front of me. Then I just narrated what I was watching, as if I was watching clouds passing by, and said "there is sadness inside me" or "there is anxiety inside me" or "there is anger inside me", and I realized the more I said this the more I detached from my emotions, and they no longer held any power over me, because they weren't me, but something I observed like clouds passing in front of me. At this point, because I understood the truth behind how things worked, I was speaking a language my neurons could understand. This exercise will re-train your neurons to fire differently by applying this concept! The dalai lama was once told about low self-esteem and couldn't even understand the concept of someone not liking themselves. The difference between us and Buddhist, and why most monks are happy, is because we train our neurons all our lives to attach to things for happiness, from the time we get a toy for Christmas, depend on it for happiness, and become unhappy when we lose it. Same thing happens as we get older with everything from relationships, to money, to everything in-between. Monks are taught to be happy inwardly, so all they need is their brain to feel good and be happy. You'll find in their circles there is almost no instances of depression because they are conditioned and raised correctly from birth. We feel like we're somehow incomplete, or our life can never be complete, and that's why many people say, "why I have X I'll finally be happy", because we feel like we can't be good enough or happy enough without something outside ourselves, but the truth is we have everything we need to be happy now! That's my best shot. Hope it helps! :)
  7. I used to feel that way. I realized eventually it was all about presence. One night I was feeling like I wanted to die and thought, "I can't live with myself anymore". At that moment I realized there was a part of me (that part that observes when I'm awake and stops when I'm asleep) that was observing and watching everything happened. At that point I realized I wasn't my emotions, that they were only occurring in the present moment, and I could watch without getting involved - like watching my emotions like something separate that was on a TV in front of me. Then I just narrated what I was watching, as if I was watching clouds passing by, and said "there is sadness inside me" or "there is anxiety inside me" or "there is anger inside me", and I realized the more I said this the more I detached from my emotions, and they no longer held any power over me, because they weren't me, but something I observed like clouds passing in front of me (if that makes any sense).
  8. I've got challenges, like every day, but nothing I can't handle lol
  9. I remember in high school my friend was on a breathing tube. When I went to see him I walked into the hospital breathing, walking, and drove my car. When I walked out I was breathing, walking, and drove my car - only I was aware of how much I had now so I actually appreciated it! Gratitude is 99% mental!
  10. I never do. I used to. I came up with an exercise a while ago after thinking, "I can't live with myself", then I realized that consciousness (that disappears when I'm sleeping) is watching me and my thoughts and feelings, so I just started acknowledging what I was seeing (like narrating a TV show in front of me that otherwise wouldn't have sound), and would say things like "there is anger inside me" or "there is sadness inside me" or "there is jealousy inside me", and by doing this I could simply accept the emotion, let it pass, and over time I no longer needed it and it went away.
  11. Most of our day is spent doing and being what others want us to be (or what we think they want us to be). Doing creative things puts us in touch with ourselves, which brings us back to a space where feel whole and connected with our true selves - basically doing creative things is loving something, and loving something brings us happiness! :)
  12. Welcome to DF :)

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