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Forum Admin last won the day on May 26 2013

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    The DF is solely dedicated to eliminating the stigma that surrounds depression and mood disorders through information, education and advocacy.
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  1. ((((((( @SailingSoul))))))))) I am so sorry to hear what you and your baby are going through! I can understand some of what you are experiencing, my grandaughter has a myriad of things. But her major issue is Borderline Personality Disorder, (BPD). She lives with my daughter and the rest of the family. I know that it is difficult being a grown woman with a baby having to live back "home". I do think that is the #1 worst MH issue you can have, as I have been there to see everything that she has gone through so far, and I would not wish that on my worst enemy. I love and adore her so much. Have you gotten any Mental Health help at all or a diagnosis? Are you certain that you have OCD? Perhaps you have another MH dx as well? Maybe you should post some things in the OCD Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - OCD Forum for suggestions and support from OCD Members? If you are not working, do you get money from the government for you and your baby? From family? Support from the baby's father? I know that it there is not much out there for people who have mental health problems and cannot work. It is an awful system. I have been trying to break the system for years for MH parity. I feel for you and your baby SS, you have not mentioned your Mother, only your father. I hope there is someone in your life that can supply you with some comfort and love. Anyway, welcome back to you and the baby, sweetie. I hope DF can give you the support that you need. -Lindsay Forum Administrator, Founder
  2. Forum Admin

    Rosh Hashanah

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    What is Rosh Hashanah? What is Rosh Hashanah? Rosh Hashanah is the celebration of the Jewish New Year. It’s a very important holiday on the Jewish calendar. It is the first of what we call the High Holidays (or High Holy Days), a ten-day period that ends with Yom Kippur—the holiest day of the Jewish year. On Rosh Hashanah, Jews from all over the world celebrate God’s creation of the world. Rosh Hashanah is two days long, and it usually occurs during the month of September. How is Rosh Hashanah Celebrated? During Rosh Hashanah, Jewish people ask God for forgiveness for the things we’ve done wrong during the past year. We also remind ourselves not to repeat these mistakes in the coming year. In this way, Rosh Hashanah is an opportunity to improve ourselves. It’s a holiday that helps us to become better people. And that’s a beautiful thing. Jews from all over the world celebrate Rosh Hashanah in different ways. Holiday traditions can be different depending on where you’re from and how your family celebrates. A special prayer service is held at synagogue. The shofar, a special instrument made from the horn of a kosher animal (usually a ram), is blown during the Rosh Hashanah service. Tzedakah, or giving charity to people in need, is also part of the holiday. Good deeds are done and charity is given in the hopes that God will seal our names in the “Book of Life,” which brings the promise of a happy year to come. What kinds of foods are eaten on Rosh Hashanah? Food is an important part of Rosh Hashanah. Many special foods are included in a traditional Rosh Hashanah meal as blessings. Sweet foods are eaten to symbolize our hope for a “sweet new year.” We enjoy “new fruit,” a fruit that has recently come into season but we have not yet had the opportunity to enjoy this year (often a pomegranate). The head of a fish is sometimes served, to remind us to be “like the head and not the tail”—so we’ll be leaders, not followers. The fish also symbolizes the translation of Rosh Hashanah, which means “Head of the Year” in Hebrew. A pretty, symbolic bread called challah is baked, sweetened with raisins and braided into a round shape. Apples are dipped in honey, again symbolizing sweetness. All of these traditions are important, because they help to connect us to the deeper meaning of the Rosh Hashanah holiday. What is the proper greeting for Rosh Hashanah? If you’d like to wish somebody a happy Jewish New Year, you can say “L’Shanah Tovah,” which is Hebrew for “A Good Year.” YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE Yom Kippur FAQ: All About the Day of Atonement Yom Kippur is the Jewish day of communal and personal atonement for sins committed during the past year. What are some of the customs on Yom Kippur? Fasting is one of the central components of the Yom Kippur holiday. When is Yom Kippur 2020? Click here to find out. Jewish adults are commanded to fast, but there are exceptions for pregnant women, nursing mothers and those who are ill. Learn here who is traditionally commanded to fast and find tips on staying healthy during the Yom Kippur fast here. What are the services on Yom Kippur? Prayer is the other central component of the holiday. The Kol Nidrei service kicks off the holiday, and Neila comes at the very end, bookending the holy day with solemn prayer. In between we read the book of Jonah and perform the special Avodah service, which involves continually and frequently prostrating oneself on the ground. Learn how to find tickets for Yom Kippur services, how to find a Mahzor (High Holiday prayerbook) and how to stream Kol Nidre and other High Holiday services on your computer.
  3. Forum Admin

    Yom Kippur

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    Yom Kippur Holy day Yom Kippur, also known as the Day of Atonement, is the holiest day of the year in Judaism. Its central themes are atonement and repentance. Jews traditionally observe this holy day with a day-long fast and intensive prayer, often spending most of the day in synagogue services. Wikipedia Date: Sun, Sep 27, 2020 – Mon, Sep 28, 2020 Observances: Fasting, prayer, abstaining from physical pleasures, refraining from work Significance: Atonement for personal and national sins, fate of each person is sealed for the upcoming year Observed by: Jews, Samaritans
  4. Borderline Personality Disorder Borderline personality disorder is a chronic condition that may include mood instability, difficulty with interpersonal relationships, and high rates of self-injury and suicidal behavior. Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by pervasive instability in moods, interpersonal relationships, self-image, and behavior. This instability often disrupts family and work life, long-term planning, and an individual's sense of identity. People with BPD, originally thought to be at the "border" of psychosis and neurosis, suffer from difficulties with emotion regulation. While less well known than schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, BPD affects 2 percent of adults. People with BPD exhibit high rates of self-injurious behavior, such as cutting and elevated rates of attempted and completed suicide. Impairment from BPD and suicide risk are greatest in the young-adult years and tend to decrease with age. BPD is more common in women than in men, with 75 percent of cases diagnosed among women. People with borderline personality disorder often need extensive mental health services and account for 20 percent of psychiatric hospitalizations. Yet, with help, the majority stabilize and lead productive lives. Symptoms According to the DSM-5, individuals with BPD exhibit some or all of the following symptoms: Efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment. Intense bouts of anger, depression, or anxiety that may last only hours or, at most, a few days. These may be associated with episodes of impulsive aggression, self-injury, and drug or alcohol abuse. Distortions in thoughts and sense of self can lead to frequent changes in long-term goals, career plans, jobs, friendships, identity, and values. Sometimes people with BPD view themselves as fundamentally bad or unworthy. They may feel bored, empty, or unfairly misunderstood or mistreated, and they have little idea who they are. Recurrent suicidal behavior. Transient, stress-related paranoid thinking, or dissociation ("losing touch" with reality). People with BPD often have highly unstable patterns of social relationships. While they can develop intense but stormy attachments, their attitudes toward family, friends, and loved ones may suddenly shift from idealization (great admiration and love) to devaluation (intense anger and dislike). Thus, they may form an immediate attachment and idealize another person, but when a slight separation or conflict occurs, switch unexpectedly to the other extreme and angrily accuse the other person of not caring for them at all. Most people can tolerate the ambivalence of experiencing two contradictory states at one time. People with BPD, however, must shift back and forth between good and bad states. If they are in a bad state, for example, they have no awareness of the good state. Individuals with BPD are highly sensitive to rejection, reacting with anger and distress to mild separations. Even a vacation, a business trip, or a sudden change in plans can spur negative thoughts. These fears of abandonment seem to be related to difficulties feeling emotionally connected to important people when they are physically absent, leaving the individual with BPD feeling lost or worthless. Suicide threats and attempts may occur along with anger at perceived abandonment and disappointments. Read More A Compelling New Framework for BPD Research: The Promise of Neuropeptides Three Factors to Understand in the Borderline Personality Why Borderline Personality Is Tough to Diagnose from Afar Causes Although the cause of BPD is unknown, both environmental and genetic factors are thought to play a role in predisposing people to BPD. The disorder is approximately five times more common among people with close biological relatives with BPD. Studies show that many individuals with BPD report a history of abuse, neglect, or separation as young children. Forty to 71 percent of BPD patients report having been sexually abused, usually by a non caregiver. Researchers believe that BPD results from a combination of individual vulnerability to environmental stress, neglect, or abuse as young children, and a series of events that trigger the onset of the disorder as young adults. Adults with BPD are also considerably more likely to be the victims of violence, including rape and other crimes. These incidents may result from harmful environments as well as the victims' impulsivity and poor judgment in choosing partners and lifestyles. Neuroscience is revealing brain mechanisms underlying the impulsivity, mood instability, aggression, anger, and negative emotion seen in BPD. Studies suggest that people predisposed to impulsive aggression have impaired regulation of the neural circuits that modulate emotion. The brain's amygdala, a small almond-shaped structure, is an important component of the circuit that regulates negative emotion. In response to signals from other brain centers indicating a perceived threat, it marshals fear and arousal, which may be more pronounced under the influence of stress or drugs like alcohol. Areas in the front of the brain, in the prefrontal cortex, act to dampen the activity of this circuit. Recent brain-imaging studies show that individual differences in the ability to activate regions of the prefrontal cortex thought to be involved in inhibitory activity predict the ability to suppress negative emotion. Serotonin, norepinephrine, and acetylcholine are among the chemical messengers in these circuits that play a role in the regulation of emotions, including sadness, anger, anxiety, and irritability. Drugs that enhance brain serotonin function may improve emotional symptoms in BPD. Likewise, mood-stabilizing drugs that are known to enhance the activity of GABA, the brain's major inhibitory neurotransmitter, may help people who experience BPD-like mood swings. Such brain-based vulnerabilities can be managed with help from behavioral interventions and medications, much as people manage susceptibility to diabetes or high blood pressure. Treatment The recommended treatment for BPD includes psychotherapy, medication, and group, peer, and family support. Group and individual psychotherapy have been shown to be effective forms of treatment for many patients. Psychotherapy is the first line treatment for BPD, and several forms of therapy, such as dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT), mentalization based therapy (MBT), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and psychodynamic psychotherapy, have been studied and proven to be effective ways to alleviate symptoms. Pharmacological treatments are often prescribed based on specific target symptoms shown by the individual patient. Antidepressant drugs and mood stabilizers may be helpful for depressed and/or labile mood. Antipsychotic drugs may also be used when there are distortions in thinking. References Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition National Institute of Mental Health US Department of Health and Human Services National Alliance on Mental Illness Last updated: 02/22/2019
  5. Dialectical Behavior Therapy Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) provides clients with new skills to manage painful emotions and decrease conflict in relationships. DBT specifically focuses on providing therapeutic skills in four key areas. First, mindfulness focuses on improving an individual's ability to accept and be present in the current moment. Second, distress tolerance is geared toward increasing a person’s tolerance of negative emotion, rather than trying to escape from it. Third, emotion regulation covers strategies to manage and change intense emotions that are causing problems in a person’s life. Fourth, interpersonal effectiveness consists of techniques that allow a person to communicate with others in a way that is assertive, maintains self-respect, and strengthens relationships. When It's Used DBT was originally developed to treat borderline personality disorder. However, research shows that DBT has also been used successfully to treat people experiencing depression, bulimia, binge-eating, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic-stress disorder, and substance abuse. DBT skills are thought to have the capability of helping those who wish to improve their ability to regulate emotions, tolerate distress and negative emotion, be mindful and present in the given moment, and communicate and interact effectively with others. Read More What Is DBT? What to Expect DBT treatment typically consists of individual therapy sessions and DBT skills groups. Individual therapy sessions consist of one-on-one contact with a trained therapist, ensuring that all therapeutic needs are being addressed. The individual therapist will help the patient stay motivated, apply the DBT skills within daily life, and address obstacles that might arise over the course of treatment. DBT skills group participants learn and practice skills alongside others. Members of the group are encouraged to share their experiences and provide mutual support. Groups are led by one trained therapist teaching skills and leading exercises. The group members are then assigned homework, such as practicing mindfulness exercises. Each group session lasts approximately two hours, and groups typically meet weekly for six months. Groups can be shorter or longer, depending on the needs of the group members. DBT can be delivered by therapists in many ways. For instance, some people complete the one-on-one therapy sessions without attending the weekly skills group. Others might choose the group without regular one-on-one sessions. How It Works DBT is a cognitive-behavioral treatment developed by Marsha Linehan, Ph.D., in the 1980s to treat people with borderline personality disorder. Those diagnosed with BPD often experience extremely intense negative emotions that are difficult to manage. These intense and seemingly uncontrollable negative emotions are often experienced when the individual is interacting with others—friends, romantic partners, family members. People with borderline often experience a great deal of conflict in their relationships. As its name suggests, DBT is influenced by the philosophical perspective of dialectics: balancing opposites. The therapist consistently works with the individual to find ways to hold two seemingly opposite perspectives at once, promoting balance and avoiding black and white—the all-or-nothing styles of thinking. In service of this balance, DBT promotes a both-and rather than an either-or outlook. The dialectic at the heart of DBT is acceptance and change. What to Look for in a Dialectical Behavior Therapist DBT assumes that effective treatment, including group skills training, must pay as much attention to the behavior and experience of providers working with clients as it does to clients’ behavior and experience. Thus, treatment of the providers is an important part of any DBT program, and therapists should practice the skills themselves. They need to know basic behavior therapy techniques and DBT treatment strategies. Look for a mental health professional with specialized training and experience in DBT. The Linehan Board of Certification, a non-profit organization, has developed certification standards for clinicians. In addition, it is important to find a therapist with whom you feel comfortable working. References Chapman AL. Dialectical Behavior Therapy: Current Indications and Unique Elements. Psychiatry. Sep 2006;3(9):62-68 Panos PT, Jackson JW, Hasan O, Panos A. Meta-analysis and systematic review assessing the efficacy of Diabletctical Behavior Therapy (DBT). Research on Social Work Practice. 2014;24(2). Valentine S, BankoffSM, Poulin RM, Reidler EB, Pantalone DW. The use of dialectical behavior therapy skills training as stand-alone treatment: A systematic review of the treatment outcome literature. Journal of Clinical Psychology. Jan 2015;71(1):1-20.
  6. The paragraph below was givn to me by my 20 yr. old granddaughter, Syd. She is doing DBT Therapy, Dialectical behavior therapy, (which I will explain somewhat below after this post). Here is Syd explaining how she is trying to cope with her feelings having BPD after 3 yrs. More stories loaded.
  7. Forum Admin

    July 4th

    Independence Day The Fourth of July—also known as Independence Day or July 4th—has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1941, but the tradition of Independence Day celebrations goes back to the 18th century and the American Revolution. On July 2nd, 1776, the Continental Congress voted in favor of independence, and two days later delegates from the 13 colonies adopted the Declaration of Independence, a historic document drafted by Thomas Jefferson. From 1776 to the present day, July 4th has been celebrated as the birth of American independence, with festivities ranging from fireworks, parades and concerts to more casual family gatherings and barbecues, now with Social Distancing. The Fourth of July 2020 is on Saturday, July 4, 2020. A History of Independence Day When the initial battles in the Revolutionary War broke out in April 1775, few colonists desired complete independence from Great Britain, and those who did were considered radical. By the middle of the following year, however, many more colonists had come to favor independence, thanks to growing hostility against Britain and the spread of revolutionary sentiments such as those expressed in the bestselling pamphlet “Common Sense,” published by Thomas Paine in early 1776. On June 7, when the Continental Congress met at the Pennsylvania State House (later Independence Hall) in Philadelphia, the Virginia delegate Richard Henry Lee introduced a motion calling for the colonies’ independence. Amid heated debate, Congress postponed the vote on Lee’s resolution, but appointed a five-man committee—including Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, John Adams of Massachusetts, Roger Sherman of Connecticut, Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania and Robert R. Livingston of New York—to draft a formal statement justifying the break with Great Britain. Did you know? John Adams believed that July 2nd was the correct date on which to celebrate the birth of American independence, and would reportedly turn down invitations to appear at July 4th events in protest. Adams and Thomas Jefferson both died on July 4, 1826—the 50th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. On July 2nd, the Continental Congress voted in favor of Lee’s resolution for independence in a near-unanimous vote (the New York delegation abstained, but later voted affirmatively). On that day, John Adams wrote to his wife Abigail that July 2 “will be celebrated, by succeeding Generations, as the great anniversary Festival” and that the celebration should include “Pomp and Parade…Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other.” On July 4th, the Continental Congress formally adopted the Declaration of Independence, which had been written largely by Jefferson. Though the vote for actual independence took place on July 2nd, from then on the 4th became the day that was celebrated as the birth of American independence. Early Fourth of July Celebrations In the pre-Revolutionary years, colonists had held annual celebrations of the king’s birthday, which traditionally included the ringing of bells, bonfires, processions and speechmaking. By contrast, during the summer of 1776 some colonists celebrated the birth of independence by holding mock funerals for King George III as a way of symbolizing the end of the monarchy’s hold on America and the triumph of liberty. Festivities including concerts, bonfires, parades and the firing of cannons and muskets usually accompanied the first public readings of the Declaration of Independence, beginning immediately after its adoption. Philadelphia held the first annual commemoration of independence on July 4, 1777, while Congress was still occupied with the ongoing war. George Washington issued double rations of rum to all his soldiers to mark the anniversary of independence in 1778, and in 1781, several months before the key American victory at the Battle of Yorktown, Massachusetts became the first state to make July 4th an official state holiday. READ MORE: Two Presidents Died on the Same July 4: Coincidence or Something More? After the Revolutionary War, Americans continued to commemorate Independence Day every year, in celebrations that allowed the new nation’s emerging political leaders to address citizens and create a feeling of unity. By the last decade of the 18th century, the two major political parties—the Federalist Party and Democratic-Republicans—that had arisen began holding separate Fourth of July celebrations in many large cities. Fourth of July Fireworks The first fireworks were used as early as 200 BC. The tradition of setting off fireworks on the 4 of July began in Philadelphia on July 4, 1777, during the first organized celebration of Independence Day. Ship’s cannon fired a 13-gun salute in honor of the 13 colonies. The Pennsylvania Evening Post reported: “at night there was a grand exhibition of fireworks (which began and concluded with thirteen rockets) on the Commons, and the city was beautifully illuminated.” That same night, the Sons of Liberty set off fireworks over Boston Common. Fourth of July Becomes a Federal Holiday The tradition of patriotic celebration became even more widespread after the War of 1812, in which the United States again faced Great Britain. In 1870, the U.S. Congress made July 4th a federal holiday; in 1941, the provision was expanded to grant a paid holiday to all federal employees. Over the years, the political importance of the holiday would decline, but Independence Day remained an important national holiday and a symbol of patriotism. Falling in mid-summer, the Fourth of July has since the late 19th century become a major focus of leisure activities and a common occasion for family get-togethers, often involving fireworks and outdoor barbecues. The most common symbol of the holiday is the American flag, and a common musical accompaniment is “The Star-Spangled Banner,” the national anthem of the United States. READ MORE: Why We Celebrate July 4 With Fireworks Photo Gallery: The Founding Fathers
  8. Forum Admin

    Flag Day

    Happy Flag Day! Flag Day is Sunday, June 14! This annual holiday celebrates the history and symbolism of the American flag. Learn about the history of this holiday and the beloved Stars and Stripes! WHAT IS FLAG DAY? Flag Day is a celebration of the American flag that occurs each year on the anniversary of the flag’s official adoption, June 14. What we know fondly as the “Stars and Stripes” was adopted by the Continental Congress as the official American flag on June 14, 1777, in the midst of the Revolutionary War. Colonial troops fought under many different flags with various symbols and slogans: rattlesnakes, pine trees, and eagles; “Don’t Tread on Me,” “Liberty or Death,” and “Conquer or Die,” to name a few. The first official national flag had 13 white stars on a blue field and 13 alternating red and white stripes—both representing the 13 original colonies. Today, there are 50 stars, one for each state in the Union, but the 13 stripes remain. Flag Day was first celebrated in 1877—on the flag’s 100th birthday—and persists today. On Flag Day, many towns and cities hold parades and events to celebrate the flag, and the colors are to be flown at all government buildings. Flag Day is not an official federal holiday, but its observance is traditionally proclaimed each year by the President of the United States. Who Made the First American Flag? Although many people believe that Betsy Ross designed and sewed the first flag, there is no true proof of that. However, records do indicate that she made ensigns and pennants for the Philadelphia navy during the war. WHEN IS FLAG DAY? Flag Day is celebrated annually on June 14. In 2020, Flag Day will be observed on Sunday, June 14. Year Flag Day 2020 Sunday, June 14 2021 Monday, June 14 2022 Tuesday, June 14 2023 Wednesday, June 14 HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN FLAG January 1, 1776: The first United States flag, the “Grand Union,” was displayed by George Washington. It became the unofficial national flag, preceding the 13-star, 13-stripe version. June 14, 1777: The Stars and Stripes was adopted by the Continental Congress as the Flag of the United States. June 14, 1877: Flag Day was observed nationally for the first time on the 100th anniversary of the Stars and Stripes. June 14, 1937: Pennsylvania became the first state in the United States to celebrate Flag Day officially as a state holiday. July 4, 1960: The new 50-star flag was flown for the first time, and is the flag that still flies today. The Grand Union Flag, the first unofficial national flag, represented here on a 1968 postage stamp. WHY IS THE AMERICAN FLAG RED, WHITE, AND BLUE? The Continental Congress left no record as to why it chose these colors. However, in 1782, the Congress of the Articles of Confederation chose the colors for the Great Seal of the United States with these meanings: white for purity and innocence red for valor and hardiness blue for vigilance, perseverance, and justice According to the End of the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, the colors originated with the British flag, which is called the Union Jack and was a combination of the Scottish cross of St. Andrew (white on blue) and the English cross of St. George (red on white) at the time. (The modern British flag also incorporates the Irish cross of St. Patrick into its design.) AMERICAN FLAG ETIQUETTE Did you know that there is a proper way to fly the American flag? The U.S. Flag Code is an official set of guidelines (not laws) that dictates how a flag should be flown in order to show it the respect and honor that it deserves. Learn all about American Flag Etiquette here, and be well-prepared to hoist the flag this Flag Day! WHERE MAY THE AMERICAN FLAG BE FLOWN 24 HOURS A DAY? The flag is usually taken indoors at night out of respect, but there are some places where flying the flag around the clock is permissible. Do you think you can guess them? The Betsy Ross House in Philadelphia The White House The U.S. Capitol The Iwo Jima Memorial to U.S. Marines in Arlington, Virginia The Revolutionary War battleground in Lexington, Massachusetts The site of George Washington’s winter encampment at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland The Jenny Wade House in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania (Jenny Wade was the only civilian killed in the Battle of Gettysburg, during the Civil War) The USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor All customs points of entry into the United States Any US Navy ship that is under way In truth, the flag may be flown at night anywhere that it may be flown during the day, provided it is properly illuminated during the hours of darkness.
  9. That is not true. But if collecting SSI, you do need to report what you earn if you are under age 65. The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program pays benefits to disabled adults and children who have limited income and resources. Reporting Wages for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) If you receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and you or your deemor (e.g. your ineligible spouse or parent(s) with whom you live) work, then either you or your representative payee must report the gross wages to Social Security. You should consistently report wages during the first six days of the month to help prevent overpayments and underpayments. Because SSI is a needs-based program for people who are aged, blind, or disabled, the amount you can receive is based, in part, on the income available to you. Generally, the more income available to you, the less the SSI payment will be. You can report wages by visiting, calling, or writing your local Social Security Office. You should ask about our options to use the automated toll-free SSI Telephone Wage Reporting Service, the free SSI Mobile Wage Reporting Smartphone app, or the my Social Security online wage reporting tool. If you want to report wages using our telephone service or Smartphone app, please contact your local Social Security office and speak to one of our representatives. Sign Up To Receive An E-mail Or Text Message Wage Reporting Reminder Regardless of which method you choose to report wages, you can sign up online to receive a monthly e-mail or text message wage reporting reminder. Sign up here! If you have any questions about SSI Wage Reporting, please contact us. (SSI Administration)
  10. @emptyman, Please read DF's Terms Of Service before posting links. If anyone wants to see his link, please PM him. Thank you! Take care. ~Lindsay
  11. Welcome to Depression Forums, @Girlnextdoor24 ! There is so much information here to discover, to talk about to your peers. Members here are so helpful. You will find it therapeutic since now it is really inconvenient to go out and about, DF is a great place to make acquaintances and get the answers that you need. Take very good care of YOU! ~Lindsay, Forum Admin, Founder Depressionforums Administrator
  12. Dear, dear @Epictetus, My goodness, I am so fortunate to have you on my staff. And I am wondering, what has made you so wise? You my dear friend are invaluable. Thank you for being here all these years. I have not thank you enough. ~Lindsay
  13. Sorry to see you go @Devlinkyla, these things happen. This is called life. We just cannot dwell on it . We can post how sorry we are, but. We have to try and stay positive if possible, and as life keeps on going we must at least try to. I lost a fabulous moderator in the mid 90's due to Suicide and everyone knew she was going to die. She was wonderful, I did not give up DF though. Neither did our members! It is difficult I know, I have been there and right now I am starting to feel it as well, but I am not giving-up! I wish you well in whatever you do and wherever you go. ❤️ ~Lindsay P.S. There were some very nice things spoken.
  14. Usually you give a medication a chance, or at least call your pDoc and they would prescribe something to calm you a bit along with the Abilify. Not just an antipsychotic alone. I was once given Haldol mistakenly!! and it was horrific! (for me)! That is one strong med, I was on it one day and my Dr. immediately took me off as it was totally not for me! Please know that you need to consult your pDoc and give your meds a chance, which most usually are btw 4-6 weeks to fully take effect. JMHO. Feel better, best wishes to you, ~Lindsay
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