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Forum Admin last won the day on May 26 2013

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    The DF is solely dedicated to eliminating the stigma that surrounds depression and mood disorders through information, education and advocacy.
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  1. Forum Admin

    Martin Luther King Jr. Day

    Martin Luther King Day is a federal holiday held on the third Monday of January. It celebrates the life and achievements of Martin Luther King Jr., an influential American civil rights leader. He is most well-known for his campaigns to end racial segregation on public transport and for racial equality in the United States.Is Martin Luther King Jr. Day a Public Holiday? Martin Luther King Jr. Day is a public holiday. It is a day off for the general population, and schools and most businesses are closed. "The Stone Of Hope" memorial by master sculptor Lei Yixin was opened to the public in West Potomac Park, Washington DC, on August 22, 2011. What Do People Do? Martin Luther King Day is a relatively new federal holiday and there are few long standing traditions. It is seen as a day to promote equal rights for all Americans, regardless of their background. Some educational establishments mark the day by teaching their pupils or students about the work of Martin Luther King and the struggle against racial segregation and racism. In recent years, federal legislation has encouraged Americans to give some of their time on this day as volunteers in citizen action groups. Martin Luther King Day, also known as Martin Luther King’s birthday and Martin Luther King Jr Day, is combined with other days in different states. For example, it is combined with Civil Rights Day in Arizona and New Hampshire, while it is observed together with Human Rights Day in Idaho. It is also a day that is combined with Robert E. Lee’s birthday in some states. The day is known as Wyoming Equality Day in the state of Wyoming. Public Life Martin Luther King Day is a federal holiday, but has slightly different names in some states. Non-essential Government departments are closed, as are many corporations. Some schools and colleges close but others stay open and teach their students about the life and work of Martin Luther King. Small companies, such as grocery stores and restaurants tend to be open, although a growing number are choosing to close on this day. Some compensate by opening on Washington's Birthday instead. Recent federal legislation encourages Americans to give some of their time on Martin Luther King Day as volunteers in citizen action groups. Public transit systems may or may not operate on their regular schedule. Background Martin Luther King was an important civil rights activist. He was a leader in the movement to end racial segregation in the United States. His most famous address was the "I Have A Dream" speech. He was an advocate of non-violent protest and became the youngest man to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He was assassinated in 1968. In 1968, shortly after Martin Luther King died, a campaign was started for his birthday to become a holiday to honor him. After the first bill was introduced, trade unions lead the campaign for the federal holiday. It was endorsed in 1976. Following support from the musician Stevie Wonder with his single "Happy Birthday" and a petition with six million signatures, the bill became law in 1983. Martin Luther King Day was first observed in 1986, although it was not observed in all states until the year 2000. In 1990, the Wyoming legislature designated Martin Luther King Jr/Wyoming Equality Day as a legal holiday. https://www.voanews.com/a/4749989.html Martin Luther King's I have a dream speech August 28 1963 I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation. Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of captivity. But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languished in the corners of American society and finds himself in exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize an shameful condition. In a sense we've come to our nation's Capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check; a check which has come back marked "insufficient funds." But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check- a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God's children. It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges. But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. And they have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone. And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, "When will you be satisfied?" We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro's basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our chlidren are stripped of their selfhood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating "for whites only." We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream. I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive. Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. Let us not wallow in the valley of despair. I say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all men are created equal." I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today. I have a dream that one day down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, that one day right down in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. I have a dream today. I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exhalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together. This is our hope. This is the faith that I will go back to the South with. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day. This will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing with new meaning, "My country 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrims' pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring." And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania. Let freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado. Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California. But not only that; let freedom ring from the Stone Mountain of Georgia. Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee. Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring. And when this happens, and when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, "Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!" -MLK
  2. Forum Admin

    Anhedonia discord

    Discord has many meanings @JD4010 I looked it up on Google and my take is that it describes the meaning of Anhedonia. If nothing else. There are too many meanings of "Discord. Take care, Lindsay
  3. Forum Admin

    Anhedonia discord

    The site is probably really good for anyone interested in Anhedonia. We do not do questionnaires here at DF and that is what he wanted, But I wish this new "member" would have posted the link to the site for anyone who has Anhedonia and is interested in joining their Anhedonia website and mentioning that they are from Depressionforums.org. Thanks! ~Lindsay
  4. Forum Admin

    Forums

    Actually we have been on the web for many years, since 2001 and continues since 2004 until the present. Which does not seem to matter, as we are still up to date, peer to peer and have the latest news updated on Twitter. I that helps. You can always use Google. Wish you the Best- ~Lindsay
  5. Forum Admin

    Quotes

    “Stay positive, all other choices are pointless punishments to your psyche.” ― Joe Peterson
  6. Forum Admin

    Operation Delta Dog

    Two big problems, one great solution. About Operation Delta Dog An epidemic of veteran suicides Every day, 22 veterans take their own lives in the United States...almost one per hour. These veterans serve their country and then come home to face the even greater challenges of TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury) and PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder) that can leave them debilitated, sleepless, and unable to cope. Massachusetts is home to about 400,000 veterans. If Veteran's Administration estimates are correct, that means that about 20 percent of those, or 80,000, of our friends and neighbors are suffering with these invisible disabilities right now. Overflowing animal shelters Each year, more than 50,000 dogs wind up homeless in Massachusetts. Many of these animals are sweet-tempered and trainable, but there’s just nowhere for them go. The sad result? Nearly half of all shelter animals are euthanized. Operation Delta Dog was founded in 2013 as a way to tackle both of these problems at the same time. Working with experienced trainers and positive-reinforcement methods, we rescue homeless dogs from Massachusetts shelters and breed-rescue groups and train them to work as service dogs with local veterans who are suffering with TBI and PTSD. Assistance animals are a practical and successful way to reduce stress, treat depression, and manage the panic attacks associated with TBI and PTSD. Trained dogs, however, are in short supply. Very few service dog organizations focus solely on veterans, and even fewer utilize rescued dogs in their programs. Operation Delta Dog wants to improve those odds. Our trainers find the very best canine candidates, pluck them from shelters, and train them for a new life filled with purpose and affection. Local veterans can participate in training without leaving their jobs or families and find relief from the debilitating symptoms of TBI, PTSD, and other challenges. The dogs get the homes they need, and the veterans get the help they deserve!
  7. Forum Admin

    Quotes

    “Silence is the source of healing. When we bring things from within ourselves out into the light of awareness, a healing process happens. In the silence, we can let go of all anger, sadness, fear, loneliness and frustration.” ― Swami Dhyan Giten
  8. How can I stop my depression, anxiety or OCD? Answer by Alice D. Domar, Ph.D, Executive Director, Domar Centers for Mind/Body Health There is no one strategy for depression, anxiety and OCD. But there are many ways in each to get healthier. Depending on the severity of symptoms, it is always a good idea to check in with a primary care physician. There are physical conditions, like thyroid disease, which can cause emotional symptoms. It is also recommended that one consult with a mental health professional before trying things on one's own, to make sure that the symptoms at the level where the following suggestions might be most effective. In cases of severe depression, anxiety and OCD, a trial of medication is usually needed before one can effectively use mind/body strategies such as Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, plus Exercise, Workout, and Fitness.
  9. Forum Admin

    New member

    Hello @Griller95, Welcome to Depression Forums! We have an entire section dedicated to medications as @Rattler6 said as well as anxiety and Depression sections. A plethora of areas to choose from. Again welcome and enjoy your stay! Sincerely, ~Lindsay
  10. Welcome to Depression Forums, @Patrscoe, My first words of advice to you and your wife is that if you can afford it and you have good insurance, please, please take your daughter to the very best mental health private facility or hospital or whatever you can find to stay so they can properly diagnose her completely. She needs the very best therapy and medical treatment and it will take some time. It is worth the time. She will have a much better, healthier chance of recovery and a so much brighter future ahead! I would say though that she might be on some type of medication and some therapy, (outpatient of course), for most of her life. But so many children do grow up to lead really good, productive, really wonderful adult lives with proper care if diagnosed early! I am telling you this as I am going through something with my daughter and granddaughter. Only my granddaughter is now well over 18. Her Mental Health problems started right when she had just turned 17. Maybe even before. If her parents had better Ins., had taken her to a good inpatient facility from the start, perhaps she might have been better by now. But she is not. Of course she is older, and no longer considered a child, but an adult and I have seen what she has gone through and is still going through. At this stage, with the lack of care and lack of good Mental Health coverage in FL for someone my granddaughters age, I seem to have so little hope for her. My heart breaks. I am still hoping that we will find somewhere that will be affordable for her and be able to take her in so she will finally receive the help that she needs. Please make the right choices. I wish you all the best with your little girl. ~Lindsay, Forum Administrator, Founder
  11. Forum Admin

    Christmas Eve

    Christmas Eve
  12. Forum Admin

    Happy New Year!

    Dear Members & Guests Wishing you all a Happy New Year with hope that You will have many blessings in the year to come. May the New Year be a memorable one. Happy New Year 2019. Don’t worry when others are unable to understand you. Worry only when you are not able to understand yourself. May you have a very Happy New Year 2019.
  13. Forum Admin

    Veterans Day

    Veterans Day U.S. World War I veteran Joseph Ambroseattends the dedication parade for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial holding the flag that covered the casket of his son, who was killed in the Korean War. Also called Armistice Day Observed by United States Type National Celebrations The Veterans Day parade Date November 11 Next time 11 November 2019 Frequency annual Related to Remembrance Day Veterans Day (originally known as Armistice Day) is an official United States public holiday, observed annually on November 11, that honors military veterans; that is, persons who served in the United States Armed Forces. It coincides with other holidays, including Armistice Day and Remembrance Day, celebrated in other countries that mark the anniversary of the end of World War I; major hostilities of World War I were formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, when the Armistice with Germany went into effect. At the urging of major veteran organizations, Armistice Day was renamed Veterans Day in 1954. Veterans Day should not be confused with Memorial Day, a U.S. public holiday in May; Veterans Day celebrates the service of all U.S. military veterans, while Memorial Day honors those who died while in military service.[1] It is also not to be confused with Armed Forces Day, a minor U.S. remembrance that also occurs in May, which specifically honors those currently serving in the U.S. military. History On November 11, 1919, U.S. President Woodrow Wilson issued a message to his countrymen on the first Armistice Day, in which he expressed what he felt the day meant to Americans: The United States Congress adopted a resolution on June 4, 1926, requesting that President Calvin Coolidge issue annual proclamations calling for the observance of November 11 with appropriate ceremonies.[2] A Congressional Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U.S. Code, Sec. 87a) approved May 13, 1938, made November 11 in each year a legal holiday: "a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as 'Armistice Day'."[3] Veterans Day parade in Baltimore, Maryland, 2016 In 1945, World War II veteran Raymond Weeks from Birmingham, Alabama, had the idea to expand Armistice Day to celebrate all veterans, not just those who died in World War I. Weeks led a delegation to Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, who supported the idea of National Veterans Day. Weeks led the first national celebration in 1947 in Alabama and annually until his death in 1985. President Reagan honored Weeks at the White House with the Presidential Citizenship Medal in 1982 as the driving force for the national holiday. Elizabeth Dole, who prepared the briefing for President Reagan, determined Weeks as the "Father of Veterans Day."[4] U.S. Representative Ed Rees from Emporia, Kansas, presented a bill establishing the holiday through Congress. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, also from Kansas, signed the bill into law on May 26, 1954. It had been eight and a half years since Weeks held his first Armistice Day celebration for all veterans.[5] Congress amended the bill on June 1, 1954, replacing "Armistice" with "Veterans," and it has been known as Veterans Day since.[6][7] The National Veterans Award was also created in 1954. Congressman Rees of Kansas received the first National Veterans Award in Birmingham, Alabama, for his support offering legislation to make Veterans Day a federal holiday.[citation needed] Although originally scheduled for celebration on November 11 of every year, starting in 1971 in accordance with the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, Veterans Day was moved to the fourth Monday of October (October 25, 1971; October 23, 1972; October 22, 1973; October 28, 1974; October 27, 1975; October 25, 1976, and October 24, 1977). In 1978, it was moved back to its original celebration on November 11. While the legal holiday remains on November 11, if that date happens to be on a Saturday or Sunday, then organizations that formally observe the holiday will normally be closed on the adjacent Friday or Monday, respectively.[citation needed] Observance Poster for Veterans Day 2018, the 100th anniversary of the endof World War I Because it is a federal holiday, some American workers and many students have Veterans Day off from work or school. When Veterans Day falls on a Saturday then either Saturday or the preceding Friday may be designated as the holiday, whereas if it falls on a Sunday it is typically observed on the following Monday. When it falls on weekend many private companies offer it as a floating holiday where employee can choose some other day. A Society for Human Resource Management poll in 2010 found that 21 percent of employers planned to observe the holiday in 2011.[8] Non-essential federal government offices are closed. No mail is delivered. All federal workers are paid for the holiday; those who are required to work on the holiday sometimes receive holiday pay for that day in addition to their wages. In his Armistice Day address to Congress, Wilson was sensitive to the psychological toll of the lean War years: "Hunger does not breed reform; it breeds madness," he remarked.[9] As Veterans Day and the birthday of the United States Marine Corps (November 10, 1775) are only one day apart, that branch of the Armed Forces customarily observes both occasions as a 96-hour liberty period. Election Day is a regular working day, while Veterans Day, which typically falls the following week, is a federal holiday. The National Commission on Federal Election Reform called for the holidays to be merged, so citizens can have a day off to vote. They state this as a way to honor voting by exercising democratic rights.[10]
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