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MargotMontage

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  1. You might prefer the older FAllout games, then, (only they're on PC, so getting them to run may be an issue.) They're isometric view, more complicated generally, and I think they're good. (I used to get my computer to run them, but not so much now.) That was before Bethesda made them, though, so that's part of why they're quite different.
  2. Thanks, BeyondWeary. I'm taking steps already to patch things up, and I appreciate your reply.
  3. Thanks for the reassurance. It's good to know that I'm not all that terrible. It's just being human, I guess, but I still get fed up with myself.
  4. The fact that I'm not starving, that I'm literate, and that I have a computer, (even if it's really old and tired).
  5. Today, it's Seven Nation Army.
  6. Hey there. I can see why this is confusing. I guess that the basic explanation is that suicidal thoughts are anything that involves thinking about it without attempting it, while being suicidal means that you want to go through with it. I definitely agree with other commenters that, to keep yourself in the 'thoughts' category rather than the 'being' category, you shouldn't have dangerous items around you. Sometimes, even if it's painful, these thoughts can be comforting, but if you want them to stay thoughts, you have to keep things that could make them come true away from yourself. I hope this helps.
  7. Yeah, I think that the problem is the same at its core, even if the discourse around it has changed. It's basically a more politically loaded topic than it should be, which doesn't help people to talk about it in terms of human lives.
  8. Alice from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland said, 'I give myself very good advice, but I very seldom follow it'. Well, that's me today. I really try to handle my anger at my family, especially those who did nothing wrong and weren't to blame for the situation, because they are also suffering. Today, though, I lost it with a family member, and was very cruel. I always say the wrong thing to her, and I feel terrible now. It's not self-loathing, (which it would have been a few years ago), because I am able to forgive myself now, but it's a problem because I know it's going to keep happening unless I can do something about anger management. That's why I liked dialectical behavior therapy. It was the only one where I was approaching getting the hang of it. But the last therapist had to leave for a while, and I haven't been able to find a good one since, because most are hung up on CBT, which isn't as helpful for anger management. (Not for me, anyway.) But the resulting depression from this interaction is going to affect us both for the rest of the week, and I wish I was stronger and able to forgive more easily. It's going to stop me attending two of the only social events I have actually wanted to attend for weeks on end. So I sorta suck right now.
  9. I'd say this is a really good form of therapy. I don't have massive experience with it, but what experience I have has been excellent.
  10. Hi notamammal. I feel for you, and am sorry to hear what has happened. Depression isn't easy to understand, and I think the best advice I can give you is to listen to your wife. This sounds very simple, but I think it's the best way to learn. You don't have to have answers. Just listen patiently, and see what you can learn from what she says. Depression is a personal issue, and even if you learn about symptoms, it won't help you understand exactly what she's experiencing. Maybe this wasn't all that helpful, but I do hope you can both move forward from here.
  11. Hi Losing_myself. It sounds like you're facing some difficult challenges. By now, you'd be quite far along with the pregnancy, and I was wondering how you are going? I wish I could help more, but the best I can do is offer support and a friendly ear.
  12. While it's good to be aware that this could be the case, it's dangerous to assume that a non-standard expression of emotions and reactions points definitively to mental illness. It wouldn't be good if every professional started taking a Total Recall style attitude towards preventing a possible future mental illness in cases where there is no mental illness yet. It would be better to focus on maintaining proven and ethical treatment for people with established, rather than projected, mental conditions. I understand that this research is well-meaning, and also interesting, but it's the kind of thing that gets taken too far sometimes, especially when medical professionals are short on time or funding for patients. If this is used as a shorthand for diagnosis without the use of other accurate testing, it is essentially a value judgement made on outward appearances, and is therefore discrimination.
  13. Hi there, I'm sorry to hear what's been going on. It's not uncommon for abusers to stop their victims from getting anywhere by telling the victim that they've become an 'abuser', and that you only get respect as a survivor of abuse if you're absolutely perfect in every way. This is rubbish. It is to be expected that you will be angry, upset, and lash out at others. It's not about you being a 'good' or 'bad' person. It's about the fact that you were abused, and people came up with stupid and false stories about the marks that showed your abuse so that they didn't have to feel guilty that it was happening. I hope you are ok, and that you keep talking to us on the forums. You sound like you need a plan to get away from the people who abused you, and in order to do that, you need to be able to not feel guilty about things that aren't your fault anyway.
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