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Lindsay

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  1. Time to start a new thread! 142 Pages!! I have No Words
  2. Welcome back Ajumbledmess! We are here for you! ~Lindsay
  3. Lindsay

    Presidents Day

    Presidents Day Presidents' Day for the year 2020 is celebrated/ observed on Monday, February 17th. President's Day, also known as Washington's Birthday, is on the third Monday of February each year and is a federal holiday in the United States. The day not only honors George Washington (born February 22), the first President of the United States, and Abraham Lincoln (born February 12) whose birthdays are both in February, but honors all the presidents who have served in the United States. Uniform Monday Holiday Act On June 28, 1968 the United States Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act [1] changing many federal holidays to move over to Monday from other days of the week. Originally Washington’s Birthday was celebrated on February 22nd each year but was permanently moved in 1968 with the signing of the new Act. So the new date of President’s Day will fall between February 15 and the 21st each year and never on his (Washington’s) actual birthday of February 22nd. Days to Presidents’ Day 2020 Monday, February 17th is day number 48 of the 2020 calendar year with 11 days until Presidents' Day 2020. Morphing the Presidents https://youtu.be/Jm5YqtODC8U Further Reading: More to read on Wikipedia Washington’s Birthday (Presidents' Day) More specifically on Washington’s Birthday George Washington’s Birthday
  4. Martin Luther King Day Each year, on the third Monday in January, the MLK Day of Service is observed as a "day on, not a day off." MLK Day of Service is intended to empower individuals, strengthen communities, bridge barriers, create solutions to social problems, and move us closer to Dr. King's vision of a "Beloved Community." Martin Luther King Jr. Day (officially Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.,[1] and sometimes referred to as MLK Day) is an American federal holiday marking the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. It is observed on the third Monday of January each year. King's birthday is January 15. The holiday is similar to holidays set under the Uniform Monday Holiday Act. The earliest Monday for this holiday is January 15 and the latest is January 21. King was the chief spokesperson for nonviolent activism in the Civil Rights Movement, which successfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law. The campaign for a federal holiday in King's honor began soon after his assassination in 1968. President Ronald Reagan signed the holiday into law in 1983, and it was first observed three years later. At first, some states resisted observing the holiday as such, giving it alternative names or combining it with other holidays. It was officially observed in all 50 states for the first time in 2000. The 3 Core Elements of Dr. Martin Luther King's Transformational Leadership These leadership traits are just as applicable today, as they were during the Civil Rights Movement. By Sonia Thompson Consultant, speaker, and CEO of Thompson Media Group@soniaethompson Every year, as we take time out to honor the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, I spend some time reflecting not only on what he was able to accomplish but how he was able to do it. We live in an age with many strong leaders, who've accomplished tremendous things, but arguably not of King's magnitude. So I'm always curious about what it was about Dr. King's leadership approach that produced such a profound impact worldwide, in the midst of extreme and unjust opposition. As I pore over his books, speeches, sermons, and other accounts of his works, I get new revelations as to what made him such a transformational leader. Here are three tenets of Dr. King's leadership approach, that strengthened not only his impact, but also compelled masses of people to look to him as an example to follow, both while he was living, and long after his untimely death. 1. Boldness Dr. King felt a strong sense of urgency to challenge unjust laws and the terrible treatment of black people during the civil rights movement. That urgency prompted him and his leadership team to take bold action, including calling for the bus boycotts, various marches, and sit-ins. That urgency fueled his boldness in telling government leaders that the progress they had made up to that point had been inadequate. It even caused him to call out other leaders in the clergy when they were silent on those matters of injustice. As you work to achieve the goals you have for your business, don't shy away from bold action. That sense of urgency behind making positive change will fuel you and your team to move from where you are to where you want to be. 2. Culture One of the elements that made Dr. King's movement so remarkable was how he was always diligent about making sure there was clarity around the norms he and his team expected of both themselves and others. He did this because he knew the culture of the movement was critical to its quest in accomplishing its goals. Thus, Dr. King spent plenty of time talking about what that culture looked like, and even training followers on how to embody that culture as they went about fighting for the cause. Here's how he covered this important topic in his iconic I Have a Dream speech: But there is something that I must say to my people...in the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again, we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. Don't leave your company or team's culture up to chance. Be clear about the values and behaviors you want everyone to embrace to create the environment needed to achieve your goals. 3. Belonging When you look at the issues Dr. King fought for, one unifying thread links them all together: belonging. Dr. King didn't want people to just exist. He wanted them to feel like they belonged in the spaces, environments, and in the world in which they inhabited. In his I Have a Dream speech, King painted vivid pictures of what belonging looked like: I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood...I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. He was also clear to highlight how far we were as a nation from that ideal: But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languished in the corners of American society and finds himself in exile in his own land. As you work to create an environment where both your customers and everyone on your team feels like they belong, declare what belonging looks like. Then be honest about how the way you operate lives up to that standard, so you can chart a path forward for how to improve. PUBLISHED ON: JAN 20, 2020 The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.
  5. I/WE all of us DO care about YOU. Always. Please do not feel anxious. I am Anxious or all of us! DF is just so much in a BIND! Pressing the Donation button will take you to the Donation page. It is PayPal and easy to use. Here is the link if you do not wish to press the Button. https://www.depressionforums.org/forums/donate/make-donation/ I hate asking this way and I thank @ladysmurf so much for PMing me 😘 She is so wonderful! @ladysmurf can PM you as well. P.S. We also still need a Tech and Support ppl and Mods -Lindsay
  6. Lindsay

    New Year's Eve

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  7. Lindsay

    Happy New Year!

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  8. Lindsay

    Merry Christmas

    Merry Christmas Christmas is celebrated on December 25 and is both a sacred religious holiday and a worldwide cultural and commercial phenomenon. For two millennia, people around the world have been observing it with traditions and practices that are both religious and secular in nature. Christians celebrate Christmas Day as the anniversary of the birth of Jesus of Nazareth, a spiritual leader whose teachings form the basis of their religion. Popular customs include exchanging gifts, decorating Christmas trees, attending church, sharing meals with family and friends and, of course, waiting for Santa Claus to arrive. December 25–Christmas Day–has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1870. How Did Christmas Start? The middle of winter has long been a time of celebration around the world. Centuries before the arrival of the man called Jesus, early Europeans celebrated light and birth in the darkest days of winter. Many peoples rejoiced during the winter solstice, when the worst of the winter was behind them and they could look forward to longer days and extended hours of sunlight. In Scandinavia, the Norse celebrated Yule from December 21, the winter solstice, through January. In recognition of the return of the sun, fathers and sons would bring home large logs, which they would set on fire. The people would feast until the log burned out, which could take as many as 12 days. The Norse believed that each spark from the fire represented a new pig or calf that would be born during the coming year. The end of December was a perfect time for celebration in most areas of Europe. At that time of year, most cattle were slaughtered so they would not have to be fed during the winter. For many, it was the only time of year when they had a supply of fresh meat. In addition, most wine and beer made during the year was finally fermented and ready for drinking. In Germany, people honored the pagan god Oden during the mid-winter holiday. Germans were terrified of Oden, as they believed he made nocturnal flights through the sky to observe his people, and then decide who would prosper or perish. Because of his presence, many people chose to stay inside. Saturnalia In Rome, where winters were not as harsh as those in the far north, Saturnalia—a holiday in honor of Saturn, the god of agriculture—was celebrated. Beginning in the week leading up to the winter solstice and continuing for a full month, Saturnalia was a hedonistic time, when food and drink were plentiful and the normal Roman social order was turned upside down. For a month, slaves would become masters. Peasants were in command of the city. Business and schools were closed so that everyone could join in the fun. Also around the time of the winter solstice, Romans observed Juvenalia, a feast honoring the children of Rome. In addition, members of the upper classes often celebrated the birthday of Mithra, the god of the unconquerable sun, on December 25. It was believed that Mithra, an infant god, was born of a rock. For some Romans, Mithra’s birthday was the most sacred day of the year. Is Christmas Really the Day Jesus Was Born? In the early years of Christianity, Easter was the main holiday; the birth of Jesus was not celebrated. In the fourth century, church officials decided to institute the birth of Jesus as a holiday. Unfortunately, the Bible does not mention date for his birth (a fact Puritans later pointed out in order to deny the legitimacy of the celebration). Although some evidence suggests that his birth may have occurred in the spring (why would shepherds be herding in the middle of winter?), Pope Julius I chose December 25. It is commonly believed that the church chose this date in an effort to adopt and absorb the traditions of the pagan Saturnalia festival. First called the Feast of the Nativity, the custom spread to Egypt by 432 and to England by the end of the sixth century. By the end of the eighth century, the celebration of Christmas had spread all the way to Scandinavia. Today, in the Greek and Russian orthodox churches, Christmas is celebrated 13 to 14 days after the 25th. This is because Western churches use the Gregorian Calendar, while Eastern Churches use the Julian Calendar, which is 13 to 14 days behind the Gregorian Calendar. Both Western and Eastern churches celebrate Epiphany or Three Kings Day 12 days after their own respective Christmases. This is the day it is believed that the three wise men finally found Jesus in the manger. By holding Christmas at the same time as traditional winter solstice festivals, church leaders increased the chances that Christmas would be popularly embraced, but gave up the ability to dictate how it was celebrated. By the Middle Ages, Christianity had, for the most part, replaced pagan religion. On Christmas, believers attended church, then celebrated raucously in a drunken, carnival-like atmosphere similar to today’s Mardi Gras. Each year, a beggar or student would be crowned the “lord of misrule” and eager celebrants played the part of his subjects. The poor would go to the houses of the rich and demand their best food and drink. If owners failed to comply, their visitors would most likely terrorize them with mischief. Christmas became the time of year when the upper classes could repay their real or imagined “debt” to society by entertaining less fortunate citizens. When Christmas Was Cancelled In the early 17th century, a wave of religious reform changed the way Christmas was celebrated in Europe. When Oliver Cromwell and his Puritan forces took over England in 1645, they vowed to rid England of decadence and, as part of their effort, cancelled Christmas. By popular demand, Charles II was restored to the throne and, with him, came the return of the popular holiday. The pilgrims, English separatists that came to America in 1620, were even more orthodox in their Puritan beliefs than Cromwell. As a result, Christmas was not a holiday in early America. From 1659 to 1681, the celebration of Christmas was actually outlawed in Boston. Anyone exhibiting the Christmas spirit was fined five shillings. By contrast, in the Jamestown settlement, Captain John Smith reported that Christmas was enjoyed by all and passed without incident. After the American Revolution, English customs fell out of favor, including Christmas. In fact, Christmas wasn’t declared a federal holiday until June 26, 1870. Washington Irving Reinvents Christmas It wasn’t until the 19th century that Americans began to embrace Christmas. Americans re-invented Christmas, and changed it from a raucous carnival holiday into a family-centered day of peace and nostalgia. But what about the 1800s piqued American interest in the holiday? The early 19th century was a period of class conflict and turmoil. During this time, unemployment was high and gang rioting by the disenchanted classes often occurred during the Christmas season. In 1828, the New York city council instituted the city’s first police force in response to a Christmas riot. This catalyzed certain members of the upper classes to begin to change the way Christmas was celebrated in America. In 1819, best-selling author Washington Irving wrote The Sketchbook of Geoffrey Crayon, gent., a series of stories about the celebration of Christmas in an English manor house. The sketches feature a squire who invited the peasants into his home for the holiday. In contrast to the problems faced in American society, the two groups mingled effortlessly. In Irving’s mind, Christmas should be a peaceful, warm-hearted holiday bringing groups together across lines of wealth or social status. Irving’s fictitious celebrants enjoyed “ancient customs,” including the crowning of a Lord of Misrule. Irving’s book, however, was not based on any holiday celebration he had attended – in fact, many historians say that Irving’s account actually “invented” tradition by implying that it described the true customs of the season. A Christmas Carol Also around this time, English author Charles Dickens created the classic holiday tale, A Christmas Carol. The story’s message-the importance of charity and good will towards all humankind-struck a powerful chord in the United States and England and showed members of Victorian society the benefits of celebrating the holiday. The family was also becoming less disciplined and more sensitive to the emotional needs of children during the early 1800s. Christmas provided families with a day when they could lavish attention-and gifts-on their children without appearing to “spoil” them. As Americans began to embrace Christmas as a perfect family holiday, old customs were unearthed. People looked toward recent immigrants and Catholic and Episcopalian churches to see how the day should be celebrated. In the next 100 years, Americans built a Christmas tradition all their own that included pieces of many other customs, including decorating trees, sending holiday cards and gift-giving. Although most families quickly bought into the idea that they were celebrating Christmas how it had been done for centuries, Americans had really re-invented a holiday to fill the cultural needs of a growing nation. Who Invented Santa Claus? The legend of Santa Claus can be traced back to a monk named St. Nicholas who was born in Turkey around 280 A.D.. St. Nicholas gave away all of his inherited wealth and traveled the countryside helping the poor and sick, becoming known as the protector of children and sailors. St. Nicholas first entered American popular culture in the late 18th century in New York, when Dutch families gathered to honor the anniversary of the death of “Sint Nikolaas” (Dutch for Saint Nicholas), or “Sinter Klaas” for short. “Santa Claus” draws his name from this abbreviation. 7 In 1822, Episcopal minister Clement Clarke Moore wrote a Christmas poem called “An Account of a Visit from St. Nicholas,” more popularly known today by it’s first line: “‘Twas The Night Before Christmas.” The poem depicted Santa Claus as a jolly man who flies from home to home on a sled driven by reindeer to deliver toys. The iconic version of Santa Claus as a jolly man in red with a white beard and a sack of toys was immortalized in 1881, when political cartoonist Thomas Nast drew on Moore's poem to create the image of Old Saint Nick we know today. Christmas Facts Each year, 30-35 million real Christmas trees are sold in the United States alone. There are 21,000 Christmas tree growers in the United States, and trees usually grow for about 15 years before they are sold. Today, in the Greek and Russian orthodox churches, Christmas is celebrated 13 to 14 days after the 25th. This is because Western churches use the Gregorian Calendar, while Eastern Churches use the Julian Calendar. In the Middle Ages, Christmas celebrations were rowdy and raucous—a lot like today’s Mardi Gras parties. When Christmas was cancelled: From 1659 to 1681, the celebration of Christmas was outlawed in Boston, and law-breakers were fined five shillings. Christmas was declared a federal holiday in the United States on June 26, 1870. The first eggnog made in the United States was consumed in Captain John Smith’s 1607 Jamestown settlement. Poinsettia plants are named after Joel R. Poinsett, an American minister to Mexico, who brought the red-and-green plant from Mexico to America in 1828. The Salvation Army has been sending Santa Claus-clad donation collectors into the streets since the 1890s. Rudolph, “the most famous reindeer of all,” was the product of Robert L. May’s imagination in 1939. The copywriter wrote a poem about the reindeer to help lure customers into the Montgomery Ward department store. Construction workers started the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree tradition in 1931. Love to our members...to everyone!!!!!!! Depressionforums.org
  9. Welcome @theseekr406! Love to have you here at Depressionforums.org. Interacting with your peers does indeed help you and as a writer will help your peers as well. If you have any questions please do not hesitate to call upon us by clicking on the Staff button above and PMing someone on the list. Take very good care of YOU! -Lindsay
  10. Talk to us....We care!

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  11. Lindsay

    Halloween!

    Halloween menu Library of Congress > Digital Collections > Today in History > October > 31 Subscribe Share/Save Today in History - October 31 Happy Halloween! On the night of October 31, many Americans celebrate the traditions of Halloween by dressing in costumes and telling tales of witches and ghosts. Children go from house to house—to “trick or treat”—collecting candy along the way. Communities also hold parades and parties. House in Horse Creek decorated for Halloween. [Horse Creek, West Virginia]. Lyntha Scott Eiler, photographer, October 5, 1996. Tending the Commons: Folklife and Landscape in Southern West Virginia. American Folklife Center Halloween, also known as All Hallow’s Eve, originated as the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain, meaning “summer’s end.” The autumnal holiday, rooted in Christian and pagan festivals—with elements of magic and mystery, celebrated the link between seasonal and life cycles. (Winter was then a time associated with death.) October’s “Bright Blue Weather” A Good Time to Read!. Albert M. Bender, artist; Chicago: Illinois WPA Art Project, Aug. 30, 1940(Date stamped on verso). Posters: WPA Posters. Prints & Photographs Division Halloween is now celebrated worldwide and reflects the assimilation of various cultures. In the twenty-first century, it has become a secular, and hugely commercial holiday.
  12. Happy Birthday @Marc C!!! Below is the Chocolate birthday cake that my wonderful Webmaster Lioninwinter made (Mark), before he passed away It will be 2 years this Christmas. I miss him terribly and anyone named Mark is so terribly special in my eyes You are specially loved here at DF! ~Lindsay ✔️
  13. Hello and Welcome @Bekkah! Please tell us what is causing you such terrible pain your entire life? What type of Doctors have you've been to? What medications have you been on. We would love to try and help you somehow, perhaps suggest something, or at least try to support you in any way that we can. Depression Forums is a safe haven and it is good to let out all the feelings and frustrations that have built up over time to your peers. We are definitely are here for you. Talk to us. -Lindsay, Forum Admin, Founder
  14. Lindsay

    Yom Kippur

    until
    WHAT IS YOM KIPPUR? Yom Kippur means “Day of Atonement” in Hebrew. This is the holiest Jewish holiday of the year and ends the ten days of High Holidays or “Days of Awe,” which begin with Rosh Hashanah. On this day, Jewish people refrain from work and all adults fast from sundown the evening before Yom Kippur until nightfall the next day. This day is about asking God to forgive sins, reflecting on past mistakes accepting repentance, and praying. Fasting is a way to cleanse and purify the body and soul. Many will wear all-white clothing to also symbolize purity. On the day itself, there are many traditional prayers. One of the most important prayers describes the atonement ritual performed by high priests during ancient times. Yom Kippur ends with a single blast that is blown on the shofar—a trumpet made from a ram’s horn. WHEN IS YOM KIPPUR 2019? Note that the Jewish calendar is different than today’s civil calendar (the Gregorian calendar). It is a “Luni-Solar” calendar, established by the cycles of the Moon and the Sun, so the lengths of days vary by the season, controlled by the times of sunset, nightfall, dawn, and sunrise. Yom Kippur is held on the 10th day of Tishrei, ten days after the start of Rosh Hashanah (the Jewish New Year). All Jewish holidays begin at sundown on the date listed. Year Hebrew Year Yom Kippur begins: 2019 5780 Sunset October 8, 2019 (to nightfall October 9) YOM KIPPUR TRADITIONS The day before Yom Kippur (and fasting), a special and bountiful meal is enjoyed with a candle lighting at the end of the meal. Many people remember those who passed before them. Some Jews also visit cemeteries on this day before Yom Kippur. Another tradition leading up to Yom Kippur is to perform charitable acts. Many Jews give money or time to the poorest among them. After Yom Kippur ends with the shofar, there is much celebration, music, and dancing. A festive “break-the-fast” meal is served with lots of satisfying breakfast foods such as bagels and spreads, kugel, blintzes, and egg dishes. See how to make your own bagels! If you observe Yom Kippur, please share your traditions below!
  15. Lindsay

    Rosh Hashanah

    until
    Rosh HaShanah Rosh HaShanah (literally, “Head of the Year”) is the Jewish New Year, a time of prayer, self-reflection, and repentance. We review our actions during the past year, and we look for ways to improve ourselves, our communities, and our world in the year to come. The holiday marks the beginning of a 10-day period, known as the Yamim Nora-im (“Days of Awe” or “High Holidays”), ushered in by Rosh HaShanah and culminating with Yom Kippur (the “Day of Atonement”). Rosh HaShanah is widely observed by Jews throughout the world, often with prayer and reflection in a synagogue. There also are several holiday rituals observed at home. Rosh HaShanah is celebrated on the first day of the Hebrew month of Tishrei,which – because of differences in the solar and lunar calendar – corresponds to September or October on the Gregorian or secular calendar. Customs associated with the holiday include sounding the shofar, eating a round challah, and tasting apples and honey to represent a sweet New Year. The origins of Rosh HaShanah are found in the Bible. The Book of Leviticus (23:24-25) declares: “In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, you shall observe a day of rest, a memorial proclaimed with the blowing of the shofar, a holy convocation.” Although this day eventually became Rosh HaShanah, the Jewish New Year, it was not originally known as such. In ancient times, there were four different New Years on the Jewish calendar. Each had a distinct significance: The first of the Hebrew month of Nisan, the New Year of Kings, was the date used to calculate the number of years a given king had reigned. The first of the Hebrew month of Elul was the new year for tithing of cattle, a time when one of every 10 cattle was marked and offered as a sacrifice to God. The first of the Hebrew month of Tishrei was the agricultural new year, or the New Year of the Years. The 15th of the Hebrew month of Sh’vat, known as Tu BiShvat, was the New Year of the Trees. Although the Torah refers to Nisan as the first month of the Jewish year, the first day of the month of Tishrei emerged as what we now know as Rosh HaShanah. The Babylonians, among whom the Jews lived, marked a “Day of Judgment” each year. They believed that on that day, a convocation of their deities assembled in the temple of the god Marduk. These gods, they held, renewed the world and judged each human being, inscribing the fate of every individual on the tablet of destiny. The legend was a powerful one, and Jews most likely borrowed elements from it in shaping Rosh HaShanah. The meeting of many deities evolved into a belief that the one God judged every Jew on that day, immediately inscribing the completely righteous in the Book of Life and consigning the completely wicked to a sad fate. Those “in between,” however, had 10 days, concluding on Yom Kippur, in which to repent before the Book of Life was sealed for the New Year. In addition to the biblical “holy convocation” and the transformed Babylonian “Day of Judgment,” the first of Tishrei also was associated with the anniversary of the creation of the world, Yom Harat Olam. For these three compelling reasons, the first day of the seventh month ultimately became the “official” Jewish New Year. It was not until about the second century C.E. that the holiday acquired the name Rosh HaShanah, which first appeared in the Mishnah. Before then, however, the day had many other designations. The oldest name, found in the Torah (Numbers 29:1) is Yom T’ruah (“Day of Sounding the Shofar”). Two other names, undoubtedly reflecting Babylonian influence, were Yom HaZikaron (“Day of Remembrance”) and Yom HaDin (“Day of Judgment”). While those terms are still preserved in the liturgy and rabbinic literature, Jews all over the world today usually refer to Rosh HaShanah as the Jewish New Year.
  16. Lindsay

    Rosh Hashanna

    What is Rosh Hashanah? Rosh Hashanah It literally means the “head of the year” is the Jewish New Year. It is a time of inner renewal and divine atonement. This year, Rosh Hashanah begins at sundown on Sunday, September 29th. For those observing two days, it ends at sundown on Tuesday, October 1st. (Some Jews observe only one day and for them it ends at sundown on Monday, September 30th.) What foods do we eat on Rosh Hashanah? It is customary to have big feasts on both nights of Rosh Hashanah and there are thus a plethora of customary dishes, including: honey cake, brisket, tzimmes and more Rosh Hashanah recipes. What are some Rosh Hashanah practices? One of the common practices of Rosh Hashanah is attending the High Holy Day services, where the shofar can be heard. Many people go to a Tashlich service where they throw bread crumbs into a naturally running body of water as a means of casting away their sins. On the second night of Rosh Hashanah it is customary to eat a new fruit, a symbol of newness.
  17. Welcome Trad, I am late on this topic and welcoming you and I apologize! I just discovered my Zoloft forum was down and I fixed it. You can go there and hopefully post. I had a problem though posting about Zoloft and it took me to the Home page...LOL If it does, We can send @ItsNeverEnough our fab webmaster/member a PM/ notice telling him so. Yes I am a Beatles fan! I am also the Owner/Forum Admin here at DF, you are not alone being a "Senior"! At the top of our forums you will find a dropdown list of Staff, who's who. etc. So please, do please post anywhere. You will relate to many of your peers and find a lot of information! Hugs, ~Lindsay
  18. Welcome to depression Forums, @Nathassia! You will start feeling comfortable posting after a few posts in no time. DF is a safe haven for you amongst our peers and you will see that there will be many things in common and different forums to explore if you haven't already. After five posts you can start a Blog by going to your settings and clicking the arrow by your member name. As far as "Quiet", this is a slow time for DF as always as we just did an upgrade and we will be busy as we approach the holidays. Take very good care of you, -Lindsay
  19. Lindsay

    Labor Day

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Labor Day in the United States of America is a public holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It honors the American labor movement and the contributions that workers have made to the development, growth, endurance, strength, security, prosperity, productivity, laws, sustainability, persistence, structure, and well-being of the country. It is the Monday of the long weekend known as Labor Day Weekend. It is recognized as a federal holiday. Beginning in the late 19th century, as the trade union and labor movements grew, trade unionists proposed that a day be set aside to celebrate labor. "Labor Day" was promoted by the Central Labor Union and the Knights of Labor, which organized the first parade in New York City. In 1887, Oregon was the first state of the United States to make it an official public holiday. By the time it became an official federal holiday in 1894, thirty states in the United States officially celebrated Labor Day.[1] Canada's Labour Day is also celebrated on the first Monday of September. More than 80 countries celebrate International Workers' Day on May 1 – the ancient European holiday of May Day. (May Day was chosen by the Second Internationale of socialist and communist parties to commemorate the Haymarket affair, which occurred in Chicagoon May 4, 1886. Beginning in the late 19th century, as the trade union and labor movements grew, different groups of trade unionists chose a variety of days on which to celebrate labor. In the United States, a September holiday called Labor Day was first proposed in the early 1880s. Alternate stories of the event's origination exist.[citation needed] According to one early history of Labor Day, the event originated in connection with a General Assembly of the Knights of Labor convened in New York City in September 1882.[4] In connection with this clandestine Knights assembly, a public parade of various labor organizations was held on September 5 under the auspices of the Central Labor Union (CLU) of New York.[4] Secretary of the CLU Matthew Maguire is credited for first proposing that a national Labor Day holiday subsequently be held on the first Monday of each September in the aftermath of this successful public demonstration.[5] P. J. McGuire, Vice President of the American Federation of Labor, is frequently credited as the father of Labor Day in the United States. An alternative thesis maintains that the idea of Labor Day was the brainchild of Peter J. McGuire, a vice president of the American Federation of Labor, who put forward the initial proposal in the spring of 1882.[1] According to McGuire, on May 8, 1882, he made a proposition to the fledgling Central Labor Union in New York City that a day be set aside for a "general holiday for the laboring classes".[6] According to McGuire he further recommended that the event should begin with a street parade as a public demonstration of organized labor's solidarity and strength, with the march followed by a picnic, to which participating local unions could sell tickets as a fundraiser.[6] According to McGuire he suggested the first Monday in September as an ideal date for such a public celebration, owing to optimum weather and the date's place on the calendar, sitting midway between the Fourth of July and Thanksgiving public holidays.[6] Labor Day picnics and other public gatherings frequently featured speeches by prominent labor leaders.[citation needed] In 1909 the American Federation of Labor convention designated the Sunday preceding Labor Day as "Labor Sunday", to be dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement.[5] This secondary date failed to gain significant traction in popular culture. Legal recognition In 1887 Oregon became the first state of the United States to make Labor Day an official public holiday. By the time it became an official federal holiday in 1894, thirty U.S. states officially celebrated Labor Day.[1] All U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and the United States territories have subsequently made Labor Day a statutory holiday. Labor Day vs. May Day The date of May 1 (an ancient European folk holiday known as May Day) emerged in 1886 as an alternative holiday for the celebration of labor, later becoming known as International Workers' Day. The date had its origins at the 1885 convention of the American Federation of Labor, which passed a resolution calling for adoption of the eight-hour day effective May 1, 1886.[7] While negotiation was envisioned for achievement of the shortened work day, use of the strike to enforce this demand was recognized, with May 1 advocated as a date for coordinated strike action.[7] The proximity of the date to the bloody Haymarket affair of May 4, 1886, further accentuated May First's radical reputation. There was disagreement among labor unions at this time about when a holiday celebrating workers should be, with some advocating for continued emphasis of the September march-and-picnic date while others sought the designation of the more politically-charged date of May 1. Conservative Democratic President Grover Cleveland was one of those concerned that a labor holiday on May 1 would tend to become a commemoration of the Haymarket Affair and would strengthen socialist and anarchist movements that backed the May 1 commemoration around the globe.[8] In 1887, he publicly supported the September Labor Day holiday as a less inflammatory alternative.[9] The date was formally adopted as a United States federal holiday in 1894. Unofficial end of summer Labor Day is called the "unofficial end of summer"[10] because it marks the end of the cultural summer season. Many take their two-week vacations during the two weeks ending Labor Day weekend.[11] Many fall activities, such as school and sports begin about this time. In the United States, many school districts resume classes around the Labor Day holiday weekend (see First day of school). Some begin the week before, making Labor Day weekend the first three-day weekend of the school calendar, while others return the Tuesday following Labor Day, allowing families one final vacation before the school year begins. Many districts across the Midwest are opting to begin school after Labor Day.[12] In the U.S. state of Virginia, the amusement park industry has successfully lobbied for legislation requiring most school districts in the state to have their first day of school after Labor Day, in order to give families another weekend to visit amusement parks in the state. The relevant statute has been nicknamed the "Kings Dominion law" after one such park.[13] In Minnesota the State Fair ends on Labor Day. Under state law public schools normally do not begin until after the holiday. Allowing time for school children to show 4-H projects at the Fair has been given as one reason for this timing.[14] In U.S. sports, Labor Day weekend marks the beginning of many fall sports. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) teams usually play their first games that weekend and the National Football League (NFL) traditionally play their kickoff game the Thursday following Labor Day. The Southern 500 NASCAR auto race has been held on Labor Day weekend at Darlington Raceway in Darlington, South Carolina from 1950 to 2003 and since 2015. At Indianapolis Raceway Park, the National Hot Rod Association hold their finals of the NHRA U.S. Nationals drag race that weekend. Labor Day is the middle point between weeks one and two of the U.S. Open Tennis Championships held in Flushing Meadows, New York. In fashion, Labor Day is (or was) considered the last day when it is acceptable to wear white[15] or seersucker.[16][17] In big cities, people try to go outside and enjoy beaches and barbecues over the Labor Day Weekend. There are also numerous events and activities organized in the cities. For example, New York offers Labor Day Carnival, fireworks over Coney Island, happy hours in restaurants, 12-hour dance parties, and many other activities.[18]. In Washington, one popular event is the Labor Day Concert at the U.S. Capitol featuring the National Symphony Orchestra with free attendance[19] Labor Day sales To take advantage of large numbers of potential customers with time to shop, Labor Day has become an important weekend for discounts and allowances by many retailers in the United States, especially for back-to-school sales. Some retailers claim it is one of the largest sale dates of the year, second only to the Christmas season's Black Friday.[20]
  20. until
    If you or someone you know is in an emergency, call The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (8255) or call 911 immediately. Suicide Prevention Awareness Month Suicidal thoughts, much like mental health conditions, can affect anyone regardless of age, gender or background. In fact, suicide is often the result of an untreated mental health condition. Suicidal thoughts, although common, should not be considered normal and often indicate more serious issues. In 2016 alone, nearly 45,000 individuals died by suicide, leaving behind their friends and family members to navigate the tragedy of loss. In many cases, friends and families affected by a suicide loss (often called “suicide loss survivors”) are left in the dark. Too often the feelings of shame and stigma prevent them from talking openly. September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month—a time to share resources and stories in an effort to shed light on this highly taboo and stigmatized topic. We use this month to reach out to those affected by suicide, raise awareness and connect individuals with suicidal ideation to treatment services. It is also important to ensure that individuals, friends and families have access to the resources they need to discuss suicide prevention. NAMI is here to help. Informational Resources Know the Warning Signs and Risk Factors of Suicide Being Prepared for a Crisis Need more information, referrals or support? Contact the NAMI HelpLine. Crisis Resources If you or someone you know is in an emergency, call 911 immediately. If you are in crisis or are experiencing difficult or suicidal thoughts, call the National Suicide Hotline at 1-800-273 TALK (8255) If you’re uncomfortable talking on the phone, you can also text NAMI to 741-741 to be connected to a free, trained crisis counselor on the Crisis Text Line. Awareness Resources Help promote awareness by sharing images and graphics on your website and social media accounts. Use #SuicidePrevention or #StigmaFree. While suicide prevention is important to address year-round, Suicide Prevention Awareness Month provides a dedicated time to come together with collective passion and strength around a difficult topic. The truth is, we can all benefit from honest conversations about mental health conditions and suicide, because just one conversation can change a life.
  21. Lindsay

    The beginning

    Hello @jeffreyd, I don't know why, but at this point I am feeling very proud of you. As a husband, a father and just a new blogger on DF. You accomplished a whole lot in just a short time. You are doing perfectly perfect for what you are feeling at this time in your life. I just wanted to tell you this as I stumbled upon your blog and say that being this, my 15th year of founding depressionforums.org, I am happy and I am glad that you are doing so well even if you do not think you are. Fondly and keep on blogging, -Lindsay, Forum Admin, Founder Depressionforums.org
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