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Lindsay

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Lindsay last won the day on October 27 2017

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About Lindsay

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  • Birthday November 7

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    LindsayFL

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Sarasota, Florida
  • Interests
    Antiques, Astrology, painting, collectibles, music, (most genre'), My Poodles, Prince Baci, of Venice and Prince Remy, "That's Our Boy!", The Gulf of Mexico, sand and surf, swimming. Dining and dancing, theater. Widowed.
    My three grown children. TWO darling grandson's (Sam & Max!)
    Sam was born on New Years Day, 2004. Max was born Feb 21, 2009. In Bucks Co PA.
    I have adorable twin granddaughters, born Oct 3rd, 2008, near me in FL!
    Two darling older granddaughters , 15 & 19, (in FL), (a very YOUNG Grandmier, I might add.) DF member since 2001
    I Am Still always Under Construction :coopwink:

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  1. World Autism Awareness Day/Month

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    By ALIX LANGONE April 2, 2018 TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. April 2 is World Autism Awareness Day, and people are wearing the color blue to raise awareness for the developmental disorder. World Autism Awareness Day is an internationally recognized event when the United Nations reaffirms its “commitment to promote the full participation of all people with autism, and ensure they have the necessary support to be able to exercise their rights and fundamental freedoms.” Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects about 1% of the world’s population, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This year’s World Autism Awareness Day is focused on supporting women and girls who have been diagnosed with the condition. “The 2018 World Autism Awareness Day observance at United Nations Headquarters New York will focus on the importance of empowering women and girls with autism and involving them and their representative organizations in policy and decision making to address these challenges,” according to the U.N.’s website. Various buildings and landmarks around the world will light up in the color blue Monday to raise autism awareness as well. The White House, the Empire State Building and Niagara Falls have all been lit in blue on Autism Awareness Day in years past. If you want to show your support for autism awareness on social media, you can use these pre-written tweets and posts, or even turn your Facebook profile picture blue for the day/onth. You can also use the hashtag #LightItUpBlue. April is also Autism Awareness Month. More than 3.5 million Americans fall somewhere on the autism spectrum, according to the Autism Society of America; about 1 in 68 children in the U.S. are identified as having ASD, according to the CDC. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex developmental disability; signs typically appear during early childhood and affect a person’s ability to communicate, and interact with others. ASD is defined by a certain set of behaviors and is a “spectrum condition” that affects individuals differently and to varying degrees. There is no known single cause of autism, but increased awareness and early diagnosis/intervention and access to appropriate services/supports lead to significantly improved outcomes. Some of the behaviors associated with autism include delayed learning of language; difficulty making eye contact or holding a conversation; difficulty with executive functioning, which relates to reasoning and planning; narrow, intense interests; poor motor skills’ and sensory sensitivities. Again, a person on the spectrum might follow many of these behaviors or just a few, or many others besides. The diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder is applied based on analysis of all behaviors and their severity. In 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued their ADDM autism prevalence report. The report concluded that the prevalence of autism had risen to 1 in every 68 births in the United States – nearly twice as greatas the 2004 rate of 1 in 125 – and almost 1 in 54 boys. The spotlight shining on autism as a result has opened opportunities for the nation to consider how to serve families facing a lifetime of supports for their children. In June 2014, researchers estimated the lifetime cost of caring for a child with autism is as great as $2.4 million. The Autism Society estimates that the United States is facing almost $90 billion annually in costs for autism. (This figure includes research, insurance costs and non-covered expenses, Medicaid waivers for autism, educational spending, housing, transportation, employment, related therapeutic services and caregiver costs.) Know the signs: Early identification can change lives Autism is treatable. Children do not “outgrow” autism, but studies show that early diagnosis and intervention lead to significantly improved outcomes. For more information on developmental milestones, visit the CDC’s “Know the Signs. Act Early” site. HERE ARE SOME SIGNS TO LOOK FOR IN THE CHILDREN IN YOUR LIFE: Lack of or delay in spoken language Repetitive use of language and/or motor mannerisms (e.g., hand-flapping, twirling objects) Little or no eye contact Lack of interest in peer relationships Lack of spontaneous or make-believe play Persistent fixation on parts of objects Share Facebook Twitter Emai Collection Curated posts related to this International Day. View now! Facebook Twitter Google+
  2. Easter

    Easter, also called Pascha (Greek, Latin) or Resurrection Sunday, is a festival and holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus from the dead, described in the New Testament as having occurred on the third day of his burial after his crucifixion by the Romans at Calvary c. 30 AD. It is the culmination of the Passion of Jesus, ... ‎Easter egg · ‎Easter Bunny · ‎Easter customs · ‎Easter (disambiguation)
  3. Passover

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    Passover The major Jewish spring festival that commemorates the liberation of the Israelites from Egyptian slavery, lasting seven or eight days from the 15th day of Nisan. http://abcn.ws/2oNnfly
  4. I am 68 and enjoying my life more than ever. Been there, got over that part. My children are grown and I have six wonderful grandchildren. I have the same problems as anyone else, but over the years you do learn to deal with them the best way you know how and have learned to. This is life. Some days I cannot get out of bed except to let my dogs out. So? I catch up on things on my iPad or phone and life is definitely worth living, it is beautiful! I do hope you see it for what it truly is. ~Lindsay P.S. Epi, I so appreciated your post. Read my Quote. This is what drives me andhas gotten me through since 2001 when I began DF.
  5. Experiencing A Psychotic Break Doesn’t Mean You’re Broken By Laura Greenstein | Mar. 12, 2018 Each year, about 100,000 youth and young adults experience psychosis for the first time. They might see or hear things that aren’t there. They may believe things that aren’t true. It’s like “having a nightmare while you’re awake,” describes Elyn Saks, a legal scholar and mental health-policy advocate. Unfortunately, when someone starts having these frightening experiences, doctors and medical professionals often tell them that their life won’t ever be the same. That they may never get better. That the best-case scenario is a sub-par existence where every goal they have is limited by their mental state. Saks, for example, was diagnosed with schizophrenia as a young woman after multiple visits to a psychiatric hospital. “My doctors gave me a prognosis of ‘grave.’ That is, at best, I was expected to live in a boarding house and work at menial jobs.” This narrative is not only exaggerated, but it’s also inaccurate. It’s akin to telling someone who recently went into diabetic shock that their life is pretty much over. Having diabetes does require proper treatment and lifestyle adjustments. It isn’t an easy health condition—nor is any illness—but you can still live a productive life. The same goes for psychosis and the mental health conditions it accompanies. Understanding Recovery There are two categories of recovery for mental health conditions that involve psychosis: clinical recovery, which refers to decreasing/eliminating symptoms and the time spent in the hospital, and personal recovery, which is “a unique process rather an end point with key recovery themes including hope, rebuilding self and rebuilding life.” This form of recovery involves personal goals and values that make life fulfilling. Personal recovery has received more attention in recent research to help combat the myth that you can’t lead a good, fulfilling life with psychosis. Even if a person hasn’t achieved a complete clinical recovery (yet), they can still work towards personal recovery. According to a 2017 study, “We should make efforts to scientifically characterize the conceptual framework of personal recovery, so that users, family members, caregivers, and professionals can understand and contribute to the users’ personal recovery and subjective well-being.” Clinical recovery takes time. And during that time, life shouldn’t be on hold. While a person is in treatment, they can still work towards theirs goals and do things that make them feel fulfilled. That way, once they leave a treatment program or a hospital visit, they have a foundation to continue building the life they want. Setting Goals Leads To Better Outcomes Clinical recovery and personal recovery work together and complement each other. According to NIMH’s research project, Recovery After Initial Schizophrenia Episode, it is essential for people experiencing psychosis to have personal goals that drive their treatment. For example, getting a degree for the career they want or getting involved with a specific cause. Working towards clinical recovery is incredibly hard, and having aspirations for the future helps individuals stay motivated and engaged in their recovery process. This is why giving someone a “grave prognosis” can be harmful and counter-intuitive: Because people experiencing psychosis have better outcomes when they are focused on achieving future aspirations. That’s hard to do when you’re feeling hopeless about your future. “Fortunately, I did not actually enact that grave prognosis” states Saks, who refused to accept that the psychosis associated with schizophrenia would define her life. “Instead, I’m a chair professor of law, psychology and psychiatry at the USC Gold School of Law; I have many close friends; and I have a beloved husband.” Saks isn’t an exception to the rule. In fact, many medical experts today believe there is potential for all individuals to recover from psychosis, to some extent. Experiencing psychosis may feel like a nightmare, but being told your life is over after having your first episode is just as scary. Both personal recovery and clinical recovery are possible—that’s the message we should be spreading to the thousands of young people experiencing episodes of psychosis. Laura Greenstein is communications manager at NAMI.
  6. Eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) an eating disorder that does not meet the criteria for: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or binge eating. Individuals with EDNOS usually fall into one of three groups: sub-threshold symptoms of anorexia or bulimia, mixed features of both disorders, or extremely atypical eating behaviors that are not characterized by either of the other established disorders. People with EDNOS have similar symptoms and behaviors to those with anorexia and bulimia, and can face the same dangerous risks. EDNOS is the most prevalent eating disorder;about 60% of adults treated for eating disorders are diagnosed with EDNOS. EDNOS occurs in both sexes. Rather than providing specific diagnostic criteria for EDNOS, the fourth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) listed six non-exhaustive example presentations, including individuals who: Meet all criteria for anorexia nervosa except their weight falls within the normal range Meet all criteria for bulimia nervosa except they engage in binge eating or purging behaviors less than twice per week or for fewer than three months Purge after eating small amounts of food while retaining a normal body weight Repeatedly chew and spit out large amounts of food without swallowing Do not meet criteria for binge eating disorder Despite its subclinical status in DSM-IV, available data suggest that EDNOS is no less severe than the officially recognized DSM-IV eating disorders. In a comprehensive meta-analysis of 125 studies, individuals with EDNOS exhibited similar levels of eating pathology and general psychopathology to those with anorexia nervosa and binge eating disorder, and similar levels of physical health problems as those with anorexia nervosa. Although individuals with bulimia nervosa scored significantly higher than those with EDNOS on measures of eating pathology and general psychopathology, those with EDNOS exhibited more physical health problems than those with bulimia nervosa. Diagnosis The three general categories for an EDNOS diagnosis are subthreshold symptoms of anorexia or bulimia, a mixture of both anorexia or bulimia, and eating behaviors that are not particularized by anorexia and bulimia. EDNOS is no longer considered a diagnosis in DSM-5; those displaying symptoms of what would previously have been considered EDNOS are now classified under Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder. Epidemiology Although EDNOS (formerly called atypical eating disorder) was originally introduced in DSM-III to capture unusual cases, it accounts for up to 60% of cases in eating disorder specialty clinics. EDNOS is an especially prevalent category in populations that have received inadequate research attention such as young children, males, ethnic minorities, and non-Western groups. References Fairburn, CG; Bohn, K (June 2005). "Eating disorder NOS (EDNOS): an example of the troublesome "not otherwise specified" (NOS) category in DSM-IV". Behav Res Ther. 43 (6): 691–701. doi:10.1016/j.brat.2004.06.011. PMC 2785872 . PMID 15890163. ^ Jump up to:a b "Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS)". National Alliance of Mental Illness. Retrieved December 21, 2014. ^ Jump up to:a b c Thomas JJ, Vartanian LR, Brownell KD (May 2009). "The relationship between eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) and officially recognized eating disorders: meta-analysis and implications for DSM". Psychol Bull. 135 (3): 407–33. doi:10.1037/a0015326. PMC 2847852 . PMID 19379023. Jump up^ American Psychiatric Association (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association. Jump up^ Aouad, Phillip; Hay, Phillipa; Soh, Nerissa; Touyz, Stephen (2016-01-01). "Chew and Spit (CHSP): a systematic review". Journal of Eating Disorders. 4: 23. doi:10.1186/s40337-016-0115-1. ISSN 2050-2974. PMC 4994215 . PMID 27555914. Jump up^ American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. Jump up^ American Psychiatric Association (1980). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.[page needed] Jump up^ Becker AE, Thomas JJ, Pike KM (November 2009). "Should non-fat-phobic anorexia nervosa be included in DSM-V?". Int J Eat Disord. 42 (7): 620–35. doi:10.1002/eat.20727. PMID 19655370.
  7. Great article above, please read!
  8. Happy St. Patrick's Day!

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    What is St Patrick’s Day? St Patrick’s Day was originally a religious feast day for St Patrick – the patron saint of Ireland and a Christian missionary. St Patrick, the son of a deacon and the grandson of a priest, was actually not born Irish but Scottish. However, he is said to have spent many years in Ireland converting the pagans to Christianity before his death on March 17 in the fifth century. Despite its origins, St Patrick’s Day has since grown into a global celebration of Irish culture, with festivities (usually, involving a fair bit of drinking) held throughout the world. However, it is also widely observed across the globe, especially in the UK, America, Canada and Australia. On March 17, the Lenten restrictions on eating meat and drinking alcohol are relaxed. Who is St Patrick? The first thing about St Patrick is he isn't technically a Saint. Shock horror. He's called Saint Patrick although he was never canonised by the Church. He was born into a wealthy family in AD387 in Kilpatrick, Scotland. His real name was Maewyn Succat. Records show at the age of 16, he was kidnapped by Irish raiders and taken to Gaelic Ireland as a slave to tend and herd sheep. During his captivity, he learned the rituals and customs of the druids - the people he eventually converted. Patrick is said to have prayed to God more than 100 times a day. He also had a dream about God, in which he later said he was told to leave Ireland by going to the coast. "You're ship is ready," he was told. The dream led to St Patrick escaping from his captors and making his way back home, where he became a priest, like his grandfather. The young man is then believed to have returned to Ireland as a Christian missionary after experiencing another vision where he was given a letter labelled "voice of the Irish". When he opened it he apparently heard the voices begging him to return. He did so, and converted thousands of the pagan Irish to Christianity in the northern half of the country. He used their symbols and Christianised them. He would use shamrocks to explain the Holy Trinity to those he preached to, resulting in the widespread focus on the plants on St Patrick’s Day. He is also said to have performed miracles and built churches across Ireland. St Patrick died at Saul – where he is believed to have begun his missionary work - and was later buried at Downpatrick, County Down. After his death on March 17, 461, he was the subject of many legends and became the foremost patron saint of Ireland. PS... It’s St Paddy, NOT Patty Believe it or not, some people incorrectly refer to St Patrick’s Day as ‘St Patty’s Day’, instead of ‘St Paddy’s Day’. As many angry Irishmen have previously pointed out, the term ‘Paddy’ is derived from the Irish name, Pádraig. In contrast, ‘Patty’ is typically used to refer to a burger – or a similar flattened cake of food. So if you’re trying to refer to the Irish celebration and not burgers or Patty from The Simpsons, we’d suggest steering clear of ‘St Patty’s Day’. Why Leprechauns? Leprechauns are typically represented as mischievous creatures who dress in green and hide pots of gold Leprechauns are diminutive fairies from Irish folklore. Their name is taken from the Irish word leipreachán. Nowadays, they are typically represented as mischievous creatures who dress in green, sport ginger beards and hide pots of gold. However, they were not always depicted in this way – with early tales describing their clothing as ‘red’ and ‘laced with gold’. Their main occupation was making and mending shoes. f you catch one of the wrinkled fairies, it is said that they must lead you to their treasure and may also grant you three wishes (sort of like a genie). Revellers tend to dress up as leprechauns on St Patrick’s Day because of the creatures’ iconic status and eye-catching appearance. Others simply wear green – a colour that has been associated with Ireland and St Patrick’s Day since the mid-17th century. Where is St Patrick’s Day celebrated? Although it is treated as a national holiday in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, St Patrick’s Day is also celebrated across the world – and even in outer space. In 2011, astronauts on board the International Space Station honoured the event by playing flutes and tin whistles belonging to the Irish group, The Chieftains. And in 2013, Chris Hadfield took photos of Ireland and one of himself wearing a green bow tie while floating weightless in the space station. In Ireland, celebrations are held across the country, with the two largest taking place in Dublin and Downpatrick, where St Patrick himself was buried. The festivities include enormous parades and festivals, with musical performances, dancing and fireworks. In the UK, Birmingham hosts what is described as the third biggest St Patrick’s Day parade in the world, which covers two miles through the city centre. The horse racing at Cheltenham Festival in Gloucestershire also usually coincides with the annual celebration. There's an event this year on the 16th - with a special race to mark the day. In the United States, St Patrick’s Day is widely observed across many states as a celebration of Irish and Irish American culture. In Chicago, Illinois, thousands of people gather annually to see the Chicago River dyed green for the occasion. And in New York, a parade is held on Fifth Avenue, which sees live bands, leprechauns and dancers waving U.S. and Irish flags take to the streets. Other countries that mark St Patrick’s Day include Canada, Japan, Malaysia, Russia, South Korea, Australia, New Zealand and Switzerland. If you’re planning to celebrate Patrick’s Day – whether that’s at a pub or in the comfort of your own home - you might wish to wear one or more of the following: - A shamrock (or a horde of them… to get fully into the spirit of the Irish) - Green clothing - A green top hat - Green accessories (think hair bows, hair dye, make-up and nail varnish) - ...basically, anything green When is St Patrick’s Day? St Patrick’s Day is celebrated every year on March 17. https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/when-2018-st-patricks-day-7561188 How to say Happy St Patrick's Day in Irish Gaelic If you're planning on impressing your friends or celebrating the special event in Ireland this year - you might want to know how to say 'Happy St Patrick's Day' in Gaelic. The Irish phrase is "La Fheile Padraig".
  9. Do not forget to set your clocks forward at 2 AM One Hour! (Spring Forward) Why we have Daylight Saving Time (CNN) Lawmakers in Florida are tired of the whole "fall back" and "spring forward" rigamarole. So they've approved a bill to keep Daylight Saving Time going throughout the year in their state. It took the state Senate less than a minute Tuesday to pass the "Sunshine Protection Act." There were only two dissenters. (The House passed it 103-11 on February 14.) The bill now goes to the desk of Gov. Rick Scott -- but it's far from a done deal after that, Even if the governor approves, a change like this will literally take an act of Congress. But if all is approved, Floridians -- who'll set their clocks ahead one hour this Sunday when Daylight Saving Time begins -- won't have to mess with it ever again. Florida will then join Hawaii and most of Arizona, the two places that are exempt from the Uniform Time Act of 1966. The Act established the system of uniform Daylight Saving Time throughout the US. A time whose time has passed? Efforts to **** off daylight saving time are nearly as old as the time shift itself. And many of the commonly offered rationales for daylight saving time (yes, it's "saving," not "savings") no longer hold true. For instance, one reason Congress used in enacting daylight saving time is that it saves energy. A 2008 US Department of Energy study reported that daylight saving time reduces annual energy use by only about 0.03%. And a study that same year from the University of California-Santa Barbara found it might even increase energy consumption. Another study found the clock changes can raise the risk of accidents by sleep-deprived motorists.
  10. Welcome Jennifer! I know that you will find much support and information here at Depressionforums.org! Our staff and members welcome you and will answer any question that you may have. Please do not hesitate to private message (PM) anyone as well. We are here for you always. & ~Lindsay, Forum Administrator
  11. Welcome Wizardwarrior315 to our Community Support Group! 

    We love having you here at DepressionForums and know you will do very well supporting our members

    ~Lindsay!

  12. It's been another weekend of being unable to leave my home and #face people, #facelife. This is not a good #coping strategy for #depression or #grief, but it's one of my safest. Tomorrow is a new day and a new battle. #mentalhealth I miss #Lioninwinter.

  13. Valentines Day

    Valentine's Day in the United States Valentine's Day is celebrated on February 14. It is a festival of romantic love and many people give cards, letters, flowers or presents to their spouse or partner. They may also arrange a romantic meal in a restaurant or night in a hotel. Common symbols of Valentine's Day are hearts, red roses and Cupid. Valentine's Day: one of the most romantic days of the year. ©iStockphoto.com/Kais Tolmats What Do People Do? Many people celebrate their love for their partner by sending cards or letters, giving gifts or flowers and arranging meals in restaurants or romantic nights in hotels. People who would like to have a romantic relationship with somebody may use the occasion to make this known, often anonymously. Valentine's cards are often decorated with images of hearts, red roses or Cupid. Common Valentine's Day gifts are flowers chocolates, candy, lingerie and Alcohol or sparkling alcohol. However, some people use the occasion to present lavish gifts, such as jewelry. Many restaurants and hotels have special offers at this time. These can include romantic meals or weekend breaks. Public Life Valentine's Day is not a public holiday. Government offices, stores, schools and other organizations are open as usual. Public transit systems run on their regular schedule. Restaurants may be busier than usual as many people go out for an evening with their spouse or partner. Valentine's Day is also a very popular date for weddings. Background There are a number of Saints called Valentine who are honored on February 14. The day became associated with romantic love in the Middle Ages in England. This may have followed on from the Pagan fertility festivals that were held all over Europe as the winter came to an end. Traditionally, lovers exchanged hand written notes. Commercial cards became available in the mid nineteenth century. Symbols The most common Valentine's Day symbols are the heart, particularly in reds and pinks, and pictures or models of Cupid. Cupid is usually portrayed as a small winged figure with a bow and arrow. In mythology, he uses his arrow to strike the hearts of people. People who have fallen in love are sometimes said to be 'struck by Cupid's arrow. Other symbols of Valentine's Day are couples in loving embraces and the gifts of flowers, chocolate, red roses and lingerie that couples often give each other.
  14. Presidents Day

    Presidents' Day in the United States Washington's Birthday, also known as Presidents' Day, is a federal holiday held on the third Monday of February. The day honors presidents of the United States, including George Washington, the USA's first president, President Lincoln, our sixteenth President. George Washington was the first president of the United States of America. ©iStockphoto.com/Jason DiLorenzo What Do People Do? Washington's Birthday officially honors the life and work of George Washington, the first president of the United States. The day commemorates past presidents of the USA. Washington's Birthday is sometimes known as Presidents' Day. This is because while most states have adopted Washington's Birthday, some states officially celebrate Presidents' Day. Some states pay particular attention to Abraham Lincoln, as his birthday was also in mid-February. In the weeks or days leading up to the holiday, schools often organize events and lessons for students about the presidents of the United States and George Washington in particular. It is a popular day for stores to start their sales. The US federal holiday is on the third Monday of February each year, but records show that George Washington's birthday is on February 22. Lincoln’s Birthday celebrates the birthday of Abraham Lincoln, one of the most popular presidents in United States history. It is a state holiday in some states on or around February 12. It's also known as Abraham Lincoln’s Birthday, Abraham Lincoln Day or Lincoln Day. Celebrate Lincoln's Birthday Some states observe the day as part of Presidents’ Day, which is officially known as Washington’s Birthday. Various activities such as re-enactments, concerts and birthday parties are often organized for the day. Organizations such as the Indiana Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission, Kentucky Lincoln Heritage Trail, and the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum often plan large-scale events to honor and remember Lincoln on or around his birthday. A wreath-laying ceremony and reading of the Gettysburg Address at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington DC are traditional events on February 12. Republican Party members may also hold Lincoln Day fundraising dinners because he is known as the first president of the Republican Party. Public Life Many businesses are open as usual and many stores hold sales on Washington's Birthday. Many delivery services, except for the Post Office, have a regular service and many, but not all, public transit systems operate on regular schedules. Some schools close for the whole week for a mid-winter recess. According to some government sources, Indiana observes the Washington's birthday holiday in December. Background George Washington was the first president of the United States of America. His first term as president was from 1789 to 1793 and his second term from 1793 to 1797. Before he became president, he played important roles in the military, leading the American Continental Army to victory over the British in 1783. Washington is often seen as the father of the United States and is probably the best known American politician ever. The likeness and name of George Washington can still be seen in many places in the United States. There is the portrait of him and three other American presidents carved into Mount Rushmore National Memorial in South Dakota. His image is also used on the one-dollar bill and the quarter-dollar coin. The capital of the United States, Washington D.C., Washington State and at least three universities are named after him. Washington's Birthday was first celebrated as a holiday in the District of Columbia in 1880. It was made a federal holiday in 1885. The holiday was originally held on the anniversary of George Washington's birth, on February 22. In 1971, this holiday was moved to the third Monday in February. This holiday is legally designated as "Washington’s Birthday". Though other institutions such as state and local governments and private businesses may use other names, it is the federal government’s policy to always refer to holidays by the names designated in the law.