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Lindsay

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Lindsay last won the day on November 12 2013

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About Lindsay

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  • Birthday November 7

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    LindsayFL

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    Female
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    Sarasota, Florida
  • Interests
    Antiques, Astrology, painting, collectibles, music, (most genre'), My Poodles, Prince Baci, of Venice and Prince Remy, "That's Our Boy!", The Gulf of Mexico, sand and surf, swimming. Dining and dancing, theater. Widowed.
    My three grown children. TWO darling grandson's (Sam & Max!)
    Sam was born on New Years Day, 2004. Max was born Feb 21, 2009. In Bucks Co PA.
    I have adorable twin granddaughters, born Oct 3rd, 2008, near me in FL!
    Two darling older granddaughters , 15 & 19, (in FL), (a very YOUNG Grandmier, I might add.) DF member since 2001
    I Am Still always Under Construction :coopwink:

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  1. Rosh Hashanah

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    Rosh Hashanah - Jewish New Year WHAT IS ROSH HASHANAH? Rosh Hashanah, literally “Head of the Year” in Hebrew, is the beginning of the Jewish new year. It is the first of the High Holidays or “Days of Awe,” ending 10 days later with Yom Kippur. This two-day festival marks the anniversary of human’s creation—and the special relationship between humans and God, the creator. Rosh Hashanah begins with the sounding of the shofar, the ram’s horn, proclaiming God as King of the Universe, just as a trumpet would be sounded at a king’s coronation. In fact, Rosh Hashanah is described in the Torah as Yom Teru’ah, a day of sounding (the Shofar). The sound of the shofar is also a call to repentance—to wake up and re-examine our commitment to God and to correct our ways. Thus begins the “Ten Days of Repentance” which ends with Yom Kippur, the “Day of Atonement.” ROSH HASHANAH TRADITIONS There are many traditions associated with Rosh Hashanah, including eating apples dipped in honey, representing wishes for a sweet and pleasant year. Spicy or sour foods are avoided. Other traditions including lighting of candles, dipping challah (egg bread) in honey, serving a new seasonal fruit, and eating a pomegranate (as its many seeds symbolize the hope that the year will be rich with many blessings).
  2. National Suicide Prevention Month

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    The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline offers free, confidential crisis counseling 24/7/365. You don't have to be suicidal to call. Acct not monitored 24/7. 1800273TALK Suicide Prevention Awareness Month Suicidal thoughts, much like mental health conditions, can affect anyone regardless of age, gender or background. In fact, suicide is often the result of an untreated mental health condition. Suicidal thoughts, although common, should not be considered normal and often indicate more serious issues. Each year, more than 41,000 individuals die by suicide, leaving behind their friends and family members to navigate the tragedy of loss. In many cases, friends and families affected by a suicide loss (often called “suicide loss survivors”) are left in the dark. Too often the feelings of shame and stigma prevent them from talking openly. September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month—a time to share resources and stories in an effort to shed light on this highly taboo and stigmatized topic. We use this month to reach out to those affected by suicide, raise awareness and connect individuals with suicidal ideation to treatment services. It is also important to ensure that individuals, friends and families have access to the resources they need to discuss suicide prevention. NAMI is here to help. Informational Resources Know the Warning Signs and Risk of Suicide Preventing Suicide as a Family Member or Caregiver Being Prepared for a Crisis Need more information, referrals or support? Contact the NAMI HelpLine. Crisis Resources If you or someone you know is in an emergency, call 911 immediately. If you are in crisis or are experiencing difficult or suicidal thoughts, call the National Suicide Hotline at 1-800-273 TALK (8255) If you’re uncomfortable talking on the phone, you can also text NAMI to 741-741 to be connected to a free, trained crisis counselor on the Crisis Text Line. Awareness Resources Help promote awareness by sharing images and graphics on your website and social media accounts. Use #SuicidePrevention or #StigmaFree. While suicide prevention is important to address year-round, Suicide Prevention Awareness Month provides a dedicated time to come together with collective passion and strength around a difficult topic. The truth is, we can all benefit from honest conversations about mental health conditions and suicide, because just one conversation can change a life. National Suicide Hotline at 1-800-273 TALK (8255)
  3. Labor Day

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    Labor Day History of Labor Day Labor Day: What it Means Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country. Labor Day Legislation Through the years the nation gave increasing emphasis to Labor Day. The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed during 1885 and 1886. From these, a movement developed to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During the year four more states — Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York — created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 other states had adopted the holiday in honor of workers, and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories. Founder of Labor Day More than 100 years after the first Labor Day observance, there is still some doubt as to who first proposed the holiday for workers. Some records show that Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, was first in suggesting a day to honor those "who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold." But Peter McGuire's place in Labor Day history has not gone unchallenged. Many believe that Matthew Maguire, a machinist, not Peter McGuire, founded the holiday. Recent research seems to support the contention that Matthew Maguire, later the secretary of Local 344 of the International Association of Machinists in Paterson, N.J., proposed the holiday in 1882 while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York. What is clear is that the Central Labor Union adopted a Labor Day proposal and appointed a committee to plan a demonstration and picnic. The First Labor Day The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on September 5, 1883. In 1884 the first Monday in September was selected as the holiday, as originally proposed, and the Central Labor Union urged similar organizations in other cities to follow the example of New York and celebrate a "workingmen's holiday" on that date. The idea spread with the growth of labor organizations, and in 1885 Labor Day was celebrated in many industrial centers of the country. A Nationwide Holiday The form that the observance and celebration of Labor Day should take was outlined in the first proposal of the holiday — a street parade to exhibit to the public "the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations" of the community, followed by a festival for the recreation and amusement of the workers and their families. This became the pattern for the celebrations of Labor Day. Speeches by prominent men and women were introduced later, as more emphasis was placed upon the economic and civic significance of the holiday. Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement. The character of the Labor Day celebration has undergone a change in recent years, especially in large industrial centers where mass displays and huge parades have proved a problem. This change, however, is more a shift in emphasis and medium of expression. Labor Day addresses by leading union officials, industrialists, educators, clerics and government officials are given wide coverage in newspapers, radio, and television. The vital force of labor added materially to the highest standard of living and the greatest production the world has ever known and has brought us closer to the realization of our traditional ideals of economic and political democracy. It is appropriate, therefore, that the nation pay tribute on Labor Day to the creator of so much of the nation's strength, freedom, and leadership — the American worker.
  4. Happy Birthday LGJ!!!

    1. Lindsay

      Lindsay

      Have a fantastic Day!!

  5. July 4th!

    Independence Day July 4th! The Fourth of July—also known as Independence Day or July 4th—has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1941, but the tradition of Independence Day celebrations goes back to the 18th century and the American Revolution. On July 2nd, 1776, the Continental Congress voted in favor of independence, and two days later delegates from the 13 colonies adopted the Declaration of Independence, a historic document drafted by Thomas Jefferson. From 1776 to the present day, July 4th has been celebrated as the birth of American independence, with festivities ranging from fireworks, parades and concerts to more casual family gatherings and barbecues. Bet You Didn't Know: Did you know New York City has the biggest fireworks display in the United States and that three U.S. presidents died on July 4? The Birth of Independence Day When the initial battles in the Revolutionary War broke out in April 1775, few colonists desired complete independence from Great Britain, and those who did were considered radical. By the middle of the following year, however, many more colonists had come to favor independence, thanks to growing hostility against Britain and the spread of revolutionary sentiments such as those expressed in the bestselling pamphlet “Common Sense,” published by Thomas Paine in early 1776. On June 7, when the Continental Congress met at the Pennsylvania State House (later Independence Hall) in Philadelphia, the Virginia delegate Richard Henry Lee introduced a motion calling for the colonies’ independence. Amid heated debate, Congress postponed the vote on Lee’s resolution, but appointed a five-man committee—including Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, John Adams of Massachusetts, Roger Sherman of Connecticut, Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania and Robert R. Livingston of New York—to draft a formal statement justifying the break with Great Britain. Did You Know? John Adams believed that July 2nd was the correct date on which to celebrate the birth of American independence, and would reportedly turn down invitations to appear at July 4th events in protest. Adams and Thomas Jefferson both died on July 4, 1826—the 50th an of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. On July 2nd, the Continental Congress voted in favor of Lee’s resolution for independence in a near-unanimous vote (the New York delegation abstained, but later voted affirmatively). On that day, John Adams wrote to his wife Abigail that July 2 “will be celebrated, by succeeding Generations, as the great anniversary Festival” and that the celebration should include “Pomp and Parade…Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other.” On July 4th, the Continental Congress formally adopted the Declaration of Independence, which had been written largely by Jefferson. Though the vote for actual independence took place on July 2nd, from then on the 4th became the day that was celebrated as the birth of American independence. Early Fourth of July Celebrations In the pre-Revolutionary years, colonists had held annual celebrations of the king’s birthday, which traditionally included the ringing of bells, bonfires, processions and speechmaking. By contrast, during the summer of 1776 some colonists celebrated the birth of independence by holding mock funerals for King George III, as a way of symbolizing the end of the monarchy’s hold on America and the triumph of liberty. Festivities including concerts, bonfires, parades and the firing of cannons and muskets usually accompanied the first public readings of the Declaration of Independence, beginning immediately after its adoption. Philadelphia held the first annual commemoration of independence on July 4, 1777, while Congress was still occupied with the ongoing war. George Washington issued double rations of rum to all his soldiers to mark the anniversary of independence in 1778, and in 1781, several months before the key American victory at Yorktown, Massachusetts became the first state to make July 4th an official state holiday. After the Revolutionary War, Americans continued to commemorate Independence Day every year, in celebrations that allowed the new nation’s emerging political leaders to address citizens and create a feeling of unity. By the last decade of the 18th century, the two major political parties—Federalists and Democratic-Republicans—that had arisen began holding separate Fourth of July celebrations in many large cities. Fourth of July Becomes a National Holiday The tradition of patriotic celebration became even more widespread after the War of 1812, in which the United States again faced Great Britain. In 1870, the U.S. Congress made July 4th a federal holiday; in 1941, the provision was expanded to grant a paid holiday to all federal employees. Over the years, the political importance of the holiday would decline, but Independence Day remained an important national holiday and a symbol of patriotism. Falling in mid-summer, the Fourth of July has since the late 19th century become a major focus of leisure activities and a common occasion for family get-togethers, often involving fireworks and outdoor barbecues. The most common symbol of the holiday is the American flag, and a common musical accompaniment is “The Star-Spangled Banner,” the national anthem of the United States.
  6. Schizoaffective Disorder Overview Treatment Support Discuss Schizoaffective disorder is a chronic mental health condition characterized primarily by symptoms of schizophrenia, such as hallucinations or delusions, and symptoms of a mood disorder, such as mania and depression. Reading NAMI's content on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder will offer many overlapping resources for schizoaffective disorder. Because schizoaffective disorder is less well-studied than the other two conditions, many interventions are borrowed from their treatment approaches. Many people with schizoaffective disorder are often incorrectly diagnosed at first with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia because it shares symptoms of multiple mental health conditions. Schizoaffective disorder is seen in about 0.3% of the population. Men and women experience schizoaffective disorder at the same rate, but men often develop the illness at an earlier age. Schizoaffective disorder can be managed effectively with medication and therapy. Co-occurring substance use disorders are a serious risk and require integrated treatment. Symptoms The symptoms of schizoaffective disorder can be severe and need to be monitored closely. Depending on the type of mood disorder diagnosed, depression or bipolar disorder, people will experience different symptoms: Hallucinations, which are seeing or hearing things that aren’t there. Delusions, which are false, fixed beliefs that are held regardless of contradictory evidence. Disorganized thinking. A person may switch very quickly from one topic to another or provide answers that are completely unrelated. Depressed mood. If a person has been diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder depressive type they will experience feelings of sadness, emptiness, feelings of worthlessness or other symptoms of depression. Manic behavior. If a person has been diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder: bipolar type they will experience feelings of euphoria, racing thoughts, increased risky behavior and other symptoms of mania. Causes The exact cause of schizoaffective disorder is unknown. A combination of causes may contribute to the development of schizoaffective disorder. Genetics. Schizoaffective disorder tends to run in families. This does not mean that if a relative has an illness, you will absolutely get it. But it does mean that there is a greater chance of you developing the illness. Brain chemistry and structure. Brain function and structure may be different in ways that science is only beginning to understand. Brain scans are helping to advance research in this area. Stress. Stressful events such as a death in the family, end of a marriage or loss of a job can trigger symptoms or an onset of the illness. Drug use. Psychoactive drugs such as LSD have been linked to the development of schizoaffective disorder. Diagnosis Schizoaffective disorder can be difficult to diagnose because it has symptoms of both schizophrenia and either depression or bipolar disorder. There are two major types of schizoaffective disorder: bipolar type and depressive type. To be diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder a person must have the following symptoms. A period during which there is a major mood disorder, either depression or mania, that occurs at the same time that symptoms of schizophrenia are present. Delusions or hallucinations for two or more weeks in the absence of a major mood episode. Symptoms that meet criteria for a major mood episode are present for the majority of the total duration of the illness. The abuse of drugs or a medication are not responsible for the symptoms. Treatment Schizoaffective disorder is treated and managed in several ways: Medications, including mood stabilizers, antipsychotic medications and antidepressants Psychotherapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy or family-focused therapy Self-management strategies and education Related Conditions A person with schizoaffective disorder may have additional illnesses: Anxiety disorders Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) See Substance abuse - See more at: https://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Schizoaffective-Disorder#sthash.D1aXkDIC.dpuf
  7. Schizoaffective disorder is a chronic mental health condition characterized primarily by symptoms of schizophrenia, such as hallucinations or delusions, and symptoms of a mood disorder, such as mania and depression. Reading NAMI's content on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder will offer many overlapping resources for schizoaffective disorder. Because schizoaffective disorder is less well-studied than the other two conditions, many interventions are borrowed from their treatment approaches. Many people with schizoaffective disorder are often incorrectly diagnosed at first with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia because it shares symptoms of multiple mental health conditions. Schizoaffective disorder is seen in about 0.3% of the population. Men and women experience schizoaffective disorder at the same rate, but men often develop the illness at an earlier age. Schizoaffective disorder can be managed effectively with medication and therapy. Co-occurring substance use disorders are a serious risk and require integrated treatment. Symptoms The symptoms of schizoaffective disorder can be severe and need to be monitored closely. Depending on the type of mood disorder diagnosed, depression or bipolar disorder, people will experience different symptoms: Hallucinations, which are seeing or hearing things that aren’t there. Delusions, which are false, fixed beliefs that are held regardless of contradictory evidence. Disorganized thinking. A person may switch very quickly from one topic to another or provide answers that are completely unrelated. Depressed mood. If a person has been diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder depressive type they will experience feelings of sadness, emptiness, feelings of worthlessness or other symptoms of depression. Manic behavior. If a person has been diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder: bipolar type they will experience feelings of euphoria, racing thoughts, increased risky behavior and other symptoms of mania. Causes The exact cause of schizoaffective disorder is unknown. A combination of causes may contribute to the development of schizoaffective disorder. Genetics. Schizoaffective disorder tends to run in families. This does not mean that if a relative has an illness, you will absolutely get it. But it does mean that there is a greater chance of you developing the illness. Brain chemistry and structure. Brain function and structure may be different in ways that science is only beginning to understand. Brain scans are helping to advance research in this area. Stress. Stressful events such as a death in the family, end of a marriage or loss of a job can trigger symptoms or an onset of the illness. Drug use. Psychoactive drugs such as LSD have been linked to the development of schizoaffective disorder. Diagnosis Schizoaffective disorder can be difficult to diagnose because it has symptoms of both schizophrenia and either depression or bipolar disorder. There are two major types of schizoaffective disorder: bipolar type and depressive type. To be diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder a person must have the following symptoms. A period during which there is a major mood disorder, either depression or mania, that occurs at the same time that symptoms of schizophrenia are present. Delusions or hallucinations for two or more weeks in the absence of a major mood episode. Symptoms that meet criteria for a major mood episode are present for the majority of the total duration of the illness. The abuse of drugs or a medication are not responsible for the symptoms. Treatment Schizoaffective disorder is treated and managed in several ways: Medications, including mood stabilizers, antipsychotic medications and antidepressants Psychotherapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy or family-focused therapy Self-management strategies and education Treatment Schizoaffective disorder is treated and managed in several ways: Medications, including mood stabilizers, antipsychotic medications and antidepressants Psychotherapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy or family-focused therapy Self-management strategies and education Related Conditions A person with schizoaffective disorder may have additional illnesses: Anxiety disorders Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Substance abuse - See more at: https://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Schizoaffective-Disorder#sthash.fmRMenHS.dpuf Hallucinations, which are seeing or hearing things that aren’t there. Delusions, which are false, fixed beliefs that are held regardless of contradictory evidence. Disorganized thinking. A person may switch very quickly from one topic to another or provide answers that are completely unrelated. Depressed mood. If a person has been diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder depressive type they will experience feelings of sadness, emptiness, feelings of worthlessness or other symptoms of depression. Manic behavior. If a person has been diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder: bipolar type they will experience feelings of euphoria, racing thoughts, increased risky behavior and other symptoms of mania. - See more at: https://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Schizoaffective-Disorder#sthash.fmRMenHS.dpuf
  8. Happy Fathers Day!

    Father's Day in the United States Father's Day in the United States is on the third Sunday of June. It celebrates the contribution that fathers and father figures make for their children's lives. Its origins may lie in a memorial service held for a large group of men, many of them fathers, who were killed in a mining accident in Monongah, West Virginia in 1907. Father's Day is a day for fathers and father-like figures. Public Life Father's Day is not a federal holiday. Organizations, businesses and stores are open or closed, just as they are on any other Sunday in the year. Public transit systems run to their normal Sunday schedules. Restaurants may be busier than usual, as some people take their fathers out for a treat. Background and symbols There are a range of events, which may have inspired the idea of Father's Day. One of these was the start of the Mother's Day tradition in the first decade of the 20th century. Another was a memorial service held in 1908 for a large group of men, many of them fathers, who were killed in a mining accident in Monongah, West Virginia in December 1907. A woman called Sonora Smart Dodd was an influential figure in the establishment of Father's Day. Her father raised six children by himself after the death of their mother. This was uncommon at that time, as many widowers placed their children in the care of others or quickly married again. Sonora was inspired by the work of Anna Jarvis, who had pushed for Mother's Day celebrations. Sonora felt that her father deserved recognition for what he had done. The first time Father's Day was held in June was in 1910. Father's Day was officially recognized as a holiday in 1972 by President Nixon. What Do People Do? Father's Day is an occasion to mark and celebrate the contribution that your own father has made to your life. Many people send or give cards or gifts to their fathers. Common Father's Day gifts include sports items or clothing, electronic gadgets, outdoor cooking supplies and tools for household maintenance. Father's Day is a relatively modern holiday so different families have a range of traditions. These can range from a simple phone call or greetings card to large parties honoring all of the 'father' figures in a particular extended family. Father figures can include fathers, step-fathers, fathers-in-law, grandfathers and great-grandfathers and even other male relatives. In the days and weeks before Father's Day, many schools and Sunday schools help their pupils to prepare a handmade card or small gift for their fathers. Public Life Father's Day is not a federal holiday. Organizations, businesses and stores are open or closed, just as they are on any other Sunday in the year. Public transit systems run to their normal Sunday schedules. Restaurants may be busier than usual, as some people take their fathers out for a treat. Background and symbols There are a range of events, which may have inspired the idea of Father's Day. One of these was the start of the Mother's Day tradition in the first decade of the 20th century. Another was a memorial service held in 1908 for a large group of men, many of them fathers, who were killed in a mining accident in Monongah, West Virginia in December 1907. A woman called Sonora Smart Dodd was an influential figure in the establishment of Father's Day. Her father raised six children by himself after the death of their mother. This was uncommon at that time, as many widowers placed their children in the care of others or quickly married again. Sonora was inspired by the work of Anna Jarvis, who had pushed for Mother's Day celebrations. Sonora felt that her father deserved recognition for what he had done. The first time Father's Day was held in June was in 1910. Father's Day was officially recognized as a holiday in 1972 by President Nixon.
  9. Dark Glasses And Kaleidoscopes:

    Found link and updated the video!
  10. Memorial Day

    Memorial Day is an American holiday, observed on the last Monday of May, honoring the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. Originally known as Decoration Day, it originated in the years following the Civil War and became an official federal holiday in 1971. Many Americans observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries or memorials, holding family gatherings and participating in parades. Unofficially, it marks the beginning of the summer season. Early Observances of Memorial Day The Civil War, which ended in the spring of 1865, claimed more lives than any conflict in U.S. history and required the establishment of the country’s first national cemeteries. By the late 1860s, Americans in various towns and cities had begun holding springtime tributes to these countless fallen soldiers, decorating their graves with flowers and reciting prayers. Did You Know? Each year on Memorial Day a national moment of remembrance takes place at 3:00 p.m. local time. It is unclear where exactly this tradition originated; numerous different communities may have independently initiated the memorial gatherings. Nevertheless, in 1966 the federal government declared Waterloo, New York, the official birthplace of Memorial Day. Waterloo—which first celebrated the day on May 5, 1866—was chosen because it hosted an annual, community-wide event, during which businesses closed and residents decorated the graves of soldiers with flowers and flags. Decoration Day On May 5, 1868, General John A. Logan, leader of an organization for Northern Civil War veterans, called for a nationwide day of remembrance later that month. “The 30th of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village and hamlet churchyard in the land,” he proclaimed. The date of Decoration Day, as he called it, was chosen because it wasn’t the anniversary of any particular battle. On the first Decoration Day, General James Garfield made a speech at Arlington National Cemetery, and 5,000 participants decorated the graves of the 20,000 Union and Confederate soldiers buried there. Many Northern states held similar commemorative events and reprised the tradition in subsequent years; by 1890 each one had made Decoration Day an official state holiday. Southern states, on the other hand, continued to honor their dead on separate days until after World War I. History of Memorial Day Memorial Day, as Decoration Day gradually came to be known, originally honored only those lost while fighting in the Civil War. But during World War I the United States found itself embroiled in another major conflict, and the holiday evolved to commemorate American military personnel who died in all wars. For decades, Memorial Day continued to be observed on May 30, the date Logan had selected for the first Decoration Day. But in 1968 Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which established Memorial Day as the last Monday in May in order to create a three-day weekend for federal employees; the change went into effect in 1971. The same law also declared Memorial Day a federal holiday. Memorial Day 2017 occurs on May 29; Memorial Day 2018 falls on May 28. Memorial Day Traditions Cities and towns across the United States host Memorial Day parades each year, often incorporating military personnel and members of veterans’ organizations. Some of the largest parades take place in Chicago, New York and Washington, D.C. Americans also observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries and memorials. On a less somber note, many people take weekend trips or throw parties and barbecues on the holiday, perhaps because it unofficially marks the beginning of summer.
  11. Mothers Day

    From Depressionforums.org
  12. Click on below for a list of Bipolar drugs Medications for Bipolar Disorder Other names: Bipolar Affective Disorder; Bipolar Affective Mood Disorder; Bipolar I Disorder; Bipolar II Disorder; Manic Depression; Manic Depressive Disorder; Manic Depressive Illness; Mood Disorder
  13. May is Mental Heath Awareness Month

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    Each year millions of Americans face the reality of living with a mental health condition. 1 in 5 Americans will be affected by a mental health condition in their lifetime and every American is affected or impacted through their friends and family. Take action today to help others as we fight stigma, provide support, educate the public and advocate for equal care. Throughout May, every MH organization participants across the country are raising awareness for the importance of mental health. Each year they fight #stigma, provide support, educate the public and advocate for equal care. Each year, the movement grows stronger. Help DF spread the word, through the many awareness, support and advocacy activities below by showing you're #IntoMentalHealth. May is Mental Health Awareness Month National Mental Health Month raises awareness about #mentalillness and related issues in the United States. In recent times, attitudes towards #mentalhealth issues appear to be changing. Negative attitudes and #stigma associated with mental health have been reduced and there has been growing acceptance towards mental health issues and #support for people with them. Despite this shift in attitude, the idea of a mental health awareness campaign is not a recent one. In the late 1940's, the first @NationalMentalHealthAwarenessWeek was launched in the United States. What is @Stigma? #Stigma is when someone, or even you yourself, views a person in a negative way just because they have a #mentalhealth condition. Some people describe stigma as a feeling of shame or judgement from someone else. Stigma can even come from an internal place, confusing feeling bad with being bad. Navigating life with a mental health condition can be tough, and the isolation, blame and secrecy that is often encouraged by stigma can create huge challenges to reaching out, getting needed support and living well. Learning how to avoid and address stigma are important for all of us, especially when you realize stigma’s effects: People experiencing mental health conditions often face rejection, bullying and #discrimination. This can make their journey to #recovery longer and more difficult. Mental health conditions are the leading cause of disability across the United States. Why is it a Problem? Even though most people can be successfully treated, less than half of the adults in the U.S. who need services and treatment get the help they need. The average delay between the onset of symptoms and intervention is 8-10 years. Suicide is the second leading cause of death of youth ages 15-24 and the tenth leading cause of death for all Americans. Please consult your doctor if you are concerned about your health. Share Your Story It’s important for people living with mental health conditions to know that they are not alone. @Sharing a @story about your personal experiences with mental health challenges can help in your own recovery as well as provide encouragement and support to others with similar experiences. Telling your story can take several forms: Prose/poetry Song lyrics Inspirational quotes Drawings Photos Videos DepressionForums.org offers safe, moderated spaces for sharing stories and creative expression: One Step At A Time and Breaking Stories. The Water Cooler. You have an authentic voice. You Are Not Alone. You can make a difference for yourself and others by sharing your experiences and perspective. What has helped? What hasn’t? What has been most discouraging about your condition? What has given you hope? There are all sorts of things you know that other people want to know—you are not alone. Let them know that they aren’t either. Get involved. Thank you to Nami.org and Whathealth.com for their contributions What is Stigma? Why is it a Problem? Stigma is when someone, or even you yourself, views a person in a negative way just because they have a mental health condition. Some people describe stigma as a feeling of shame or judgement from someone else. Stigma can even come from an internal place, confusing feeling bad with being bad. Navigating life with a mental health condition can be tough, and the isolation, blame and secrecy that is often encouraged by stigma can create huge challenges to reaching out, getting needed support and living well. Learning how to avoid and address stigma are important for all of us, especially when you realize stigma’s effects: People experiencing mental health conditions often face rejection, bullying and discrimination. This can make their journey to recovery longer and more difficult. Mental health conditions are the leading cause of disability across the United States. Even though most people can be successfully treated, less than half of the adults in the U.S. who need services and treatment get the help they need. The average delay between the onset of symptoms and intervention is 8-10 years. Suicide is the second leading cause of death of youth ages 15-24 and the tenth leading cause of death for all Americans. - See more at: https://www.nami.org/stigmafree#sthash.I3vqE99S.dpuf What is Stigma? Why is it a Problem? Stigma is when someone, or even you yourself, views a person in a negative way just because they have a mental health condition. Some people describe stigma as a feeling of shame or judgement from someone else. Stigma can even come from an internal place, confusing feeling bad with being bad. Navigating life with a mental health condition can be tough, and the isolation, blame and secrecy that is often encouraged by stigma can create huge challenges to reaching out, getting needed support and living well. Learning how to avoid and address stigma are important for all of us, especially when you realize stigma’s effects: People experiencing mental health conditions often face rejection, bullying and discrimination. This can make their journey to recovery longer and more difficult. Mental health conditions are the leading cause of disability across the United States. Even though most people can be successfully treated, less than half of the adults in the U.S. who need services and treatment get the help they need. The average delay between the onset of symptoms and intervention is 8-10 years. Suicide is the second leading cause of death of youth ages 15-24 and the tenth leading cause of death for all Americans. - See more at: https://www.nami.org/stigmafree#sthash.I3vqE99S.dpuf
  14. UK Mother's Day

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    UK Mum's Day It's one of those dates that changes each year and one that's easily forgotten without a gentle reminder. The origins of Mother’s Day date back as early as the ancient Greek times. The ancient Greeks dedicated an annual spring festival to maternal goddesses and ancient Romans also celebrated a spring festival called Hilaria which was for a mother goddess called Cybele. The occasion is celebrated on different dates throughout the world but here in the UK it will fall on March 26 in 2017. In the UK Mother's Day is always the fourth Sunday of Lent, the 24-hours marks the maternal bond that exists between a mum and child - as well as other maternal figures such as grandmothers, mothers-in-law and stepmums. When is Mother's Day 2017? If you want to plan something special for your mum this year then you need to note it now - Mother's Day falls on Sunday, March 26. Just two days before the new £1 coin is released. There's almost definitely no correlation there however. Mothering Sunday is a Christian celebration, which we Brits celebrate exactly three weeks before Easter Sunday. It has now evolved into a day of appreciation for all the maternal women in our lives. Traditionally gifts such as flowers and chocolates are given as special thanks for all that mums do. What are the origins of Mother's Day? Mothering Sunday is a Christian celebration that has now become a worldwide event where we show mums how much we appreciate them. More than 30% of Brits say their mum is the most inspirational person in their life. Mother's Day is traditionally a celebration to observe and celebrate mums, grandmothers and step-mums with flowers, breakfast in bed, gifts and cards. As previously mentioned, Mother's Day can find its origins back in the ancient Greek times but we celebrate it today in a way which the Americans started in the early 20th Century. More recent origins of Mothering Sunday date back to the 1600s in England when it was held on the fourth Sunday of Lent. It was originally a day for Christians to visit their 'mother church'.
  15. Thank you, KS! There is no room for these type of arguments or attacks on DF. Everyone has their opinions, but if it turns into attacking someone for them, then we stop them. ~Lindsay