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Lindsay

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Lindsay last won the day on October 27 2017

Lindsay had the most liked content!

About Lindsay

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    Forum Super Administrator
  • Birthday November 7

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    LindsayFL

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Sarasota, Florida
  • Interests
    Antiques, Astrology, painting, collectibles, music, (most genre'), My two gorgeous Poodles, The Gulf of Mexico, sand and surf, swimming. Dining and dancing, theater. I am Widowed.
    My three grown children. TWO darling grandson's (Sam & Max!)
    Sam was born on New Years Day! He is 13 & Max was born in Feb'09! in Bucks Co PA!
    I have adorable twin granddaughters, born Oct 3rd, 2008, in FL!
    Two darling older granddaughters , 18 & 21, (in FL), (I am a very YOUNG Grandmier, I might add.) A DF member since 2001 and an DF Owner since 2004~
    I Am and still and always Under Construction :coopwink:

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  1. Lindsay

    Yom Kippur

    until
    what is yom kippur? What is the proper greeting for Yom Kippur? The greeting for Yom Kippur is “G’mar Hatima Tova” (May you be sealed in the Book of Life), or the shorter version “G’mar Tov.” It is also customary to say “Have an easy fast” before the holiday begins. When is Yom Kippur? Yom Kippur is observed on the 10th of Tishrei. Yom Kippur occurs on the following dates: Jewish Year 5779: Sunset September 18, 2018 – Nightfall September 19, 2018 Jewish Year 5780: Sunset October 8, 2019 – Nightfall October 9, 2019 Jewish Year 5781: Sunset September 27, 2020 – Nightfall September 28, 2020 Jewish Year 5782: Sunset September 15, 2021 – Nightfall September 16, 2021 Yom Kippur (The Day of Atonement) is the day of repentance, the most holy day on the Jewish calendar. Described as a Shabbat shabbaton (Shabbat of solemn rest) in the Torah, Yom Kippur is a day of fasting, prayer, and reflection. Yom Kippur is the culmination of a period of time during the month of Elul in which Jews are required to take stock of their lives, to ask forgiveness from friends and family, and to take steps toward self-improvement for the year to come. For Yom Kippur Break Fast Recipes, click here How is Yom Kippur observed? Yom Kippur is observed for a 25-hour period, beginning at sundown, by refraining from work that is prohibited on Shabbat, plus five additional prohibitions: 1) eating or drinking; 2) bathing; 3) anointing the body with oil; 4) wearing leather shoes; and 5) sexual relations. There are five synagogue services over the course of Yom Kippur: Kol Nidrei (evening service focused on the cantor’s confession on behalf of the community); Shachrit (morning service); Musaf (additional service); Mincha (afternoon service); and Ne’ilah (closing service). It is customary to also include a Yizkor service (memorial for those who have died this year) as part of the morning service. Yom Kippur services contain many recitations of the Vidui (confession), which is a list of communal transgressions for which we ask forgiveness. Traditionally, Jews believe that after judging a person for their deeds over the past year, God decides who will be sealed in the Book of Life (to live for another year) and who will die. Others simply use the day as a time to reflect on what they want to do differently this year. Some people wear white on Yom Kippur to symbolize the purity of the day. What kinds of foods are eaten for the Yom Kippur Break-Fast? There are two meals associated with Yom Kippur: the pre-fast meal and the break-fast meal (obviously, for the duration of the fasting holiday, no food or drink is allowed). The pre-fast meal is known as seudah ha-mafaseket (literally, “meal of separation” or “concluding meal”). Some traditional recipe choices for the meal include: rice, kreplach (stuffed dumplings), challah (dipped in honey, as Yom Kippur occurs 10 days after Rosh Hashanah), chicken, or fish. Meals usually should be prepared with minimum salt, as this could cause dehydration during the fast. It is important to drink plenty of water, of course. The break-fast meal usually consists of hi-carb dairy foods like sweet kugel (noodle pudding), bagels, quiches, soufflés, eggs, cheese, etc. What is the proper greeting for Yom Kippur? The greeting for Yom Kippur is “G’mar Hatima Tova” (May you be sealed in the Book of Life), or the shorter version “G’mar Tov.” It is also customary to say “Have an easy fast” before the holiday begins. When is Yom Kippur? Yom Kippur is observed on the 10th of Tishrei. Yom Kippur occurs on the following dates: Jewish Year 5779: Sunset September 18, 2018 – Nightfall September 19, 2018 Jewish Year 5780: Sunset October 8, 2019 – Nightfall October 9, 2019 Jewish Year 5781: Sunset September 27, 2020 – Nightfall September 28, 2020 Jewish Year 5782: Sunset September 15, 2021 – Nightfall September 16, 2021 See the full post: https://toriavey.com/what-is-yom-kippur/#UObjI2Z613L100K4.99 See the full post:https://toriavey.com/what-is-yom-kippur/#UObjI2Z613L100K4.99 See the full post: https://toriavey.com/what-is-yom-kippur/#UObjI2Z613L100K4.99
  2. Lindsay

    Yom Kippur

    until
    Yom Kippur (The Day of Atonement) is the day of repentance, the most holy day on the Jewish calendar. Described as a Shabbat shabbaton (Shabbat of solemn rest) in the Torah, Yom Kippur is a day of fasting, prayer, and reflection. Yom Kippur is the culmination of a period of time during the month of Elul in which Jews are required to take stock of their lives, to ask forgiveness from friends and family, and to take steps toward self-improvement for the year to come. For Yom Kippur Break Fast Recipes, click here How is Yom Kippur observed? Yom Kippur is observed for a 25-hour period, beginning at sundown, by refraining from work that is prohibited on Shabbat, plus five additional prohibitions: 1) eating or drinking; 2) bathing; 3) anointing the body with oil; 4) wearing leather shoes; and 5) sexual relations. There are five synagogue services over the course of Yom Kippur: Kol Nidrei (evening service focused on the cantor’s confession on behalf of the community); Shachrit (morning service); Musaf (additional service); Mincha (afternoon service); and Ne’ilah (closing service). It is customary to also include a Yizkor service (memorial for those who have died this year) as part of the morning service. Yom Kippur services contain many recitations of the Vidui (confession), which is a list of communal transgressions for which we ask forgiveness. Traditionally, Jews believe that after judging a person for their deeds over the past year, God decides who will be sealed in the Book of Life (to live for another year) and who will die. Others simply use the day as a time to reflect on what they want to do differently this year. Some people wear white on Yom Kippur to symbolize the purity of the day. What kinds of foods are eaten for the Yom Kippur Break-Fast?There are two meals associated with Yom Kippur: the pre-fast meal and the break-fast meal (obviously, for the duration of the fasting holiday, no food or drink is allowed). The pre-fast meal is known as seudah ha-mafaseket (literally, “meal of separation” or “concluding meal”). Some traditional recipe choices for the meal include: rice, kreplach (stuffed dumplings), challah (dipped in honey, as Yom Kippur occurs 10 days after Rosh Hashanah), chicken, or fish. Meals usually should be prepared with minimum salt, as this could cause dehydration during the fast. It is important to drink plenty of water, of course. The break-fast meal usually consists of hi-carb dairy foods like sweet kugel (noodle pudding), bagels, quiches, soufflés, eggs, cheese, etc. What is the proper greeting for Yom Kippur? The greeting for Yom Kippur is “G’mar Hatima Tova” (May you be sealed in the Book of Life), or the shorter version “G’mar Tov.” It is also customary to say “Have an easy fast” before the holiday begins. When is Yom Kippur? Yom Kippur is observed on the 10th of Tishrei. Yom Kippur occurs on the following dates: Jewish Year 5779: Sunset September 18, 2018 – Nightfall September 19, 2018 Jewish Year 5780: Sunset October 8, 2019 – Nightfall October 9, 2019 Jewish Year 5781: Sunset September 27, 2020 – Nightfall September 28, 2020 Jewish Year 5782: Sunset September 15, 2021 – Nightfall September 16, 2021 See the full post:https://toriavey.com/what-is-yom-kippur/#UObjI2Z613L100K4.99
  3. Lindsay

    Rosh Hashana

    until
    What is Rosh Hashanah? Rosh Hashanah is the celebration of the Jewish New Year. It’s a very important holiday on the Jewish calendar. It is the first of what we call the High Holidays (or High Holy Days), a ten-day period that ends with Yom Kippur—the holiest day of the Jewish year. On Rosh Hashanah, Jews from all over the world celebrate God’s creation of the world. Rosh Hashanah is two days long, and it usually occurs during the month of September. For Rosh Hashanah Recipes, click here For Rosh Hashanah Crafts, click here How is Rosh Hashanah Celebrated? During Rosh Hashanah, Jewish people ask God for forgiveness for the things we’ve done wrong during the past year. We also remind ourselves not to repeat these mistakes in the coming year. In this way, Rosh Hashanah is an opportunity to improve ourselves. It’s a holiday that helps us to become better people. And that’s a beautiful thing. Jews from all over the world celebrate Rosh Hashanah in different ways. Holiday traditions can be different depending on where you’re from and how your family celebrates. A special prayer service is held at synagogue. The shofar, a special instrument made from the horn of a kosher animal (usually a ram), is blown during the Rosh Hashanah service. Tzedakah, or giving charity to people in need, is also part of the holiday. Good deeds are done and charity is given in the hopes that God will seal our names in the “Book of Life,” which brings the promise of a happy year to come. What kinds of foods are eaten on Rosh Hashanah? Food is an important part of Rosh Hashanah. Many special foods are included in a traditional Rosh Hashanah meal as blessings. Sweet foods are eaten to symbolize our hope for a “sweet new year.” We enjoy “new fruit,” a fruit that has recently come into season but we have not yet had the opportunity to enjoy this year (often a pomegranate). The head of a fish is sometimes served, to remind us to be “like the head and not the tail”—so we’ll be leaders, not followers. The fish also symbolizes the translation of Rosh Hashanah, which means “Head of the Year” in Hebrew. A pretty, symbolic bread called challah is baked, sweetened with raisins and braided into a round shape. Apples are dipped in honey, again symbolizing sweetness. All of these traditions are important, because they help to connect us to the deeper meaning of the Rosh Hashanah holiday. See the full post: https://toriavey.com/what-is-rosh-hashanah/#4OeAaR71s6spRhh8.99
  4. Lindsay

    Rosh HaShanah

    Rosh HaShanah History Rosh Hashanah is the celebration of the Jewish New Year. It’s a very important holiday on the Jewish calendar. It is the first of what we call the High Holidays (or High Holy Days), a ten-day period that ends with Yom Kippur—the holiest day of the Jewish year. On Rosh Hashanah, Jews from all over the world celebrate God’s creation of the world. Rosh Hashanah is two days long, and it usually occurs during the month of September. For Rosh Hashanah Recipes, click here For Rosh Hashanah Crafts, click here How is Rosh Hashanah Celebrated? During Rosh Hashanah, Jewish people ask God for forgiveness for the things we’ve done wrong during the past year. We also remind ourselves not to repeat these mistakes in the coming year. In this way, Rosh Hashanah is an opportunity to improve ourselves. It’s a holiday that helps us to become better people. And that’s a beautiful thing. Jews from all over the world celebrate Rosh Hashanah in different ways. Holiday traditions can be different depending on where you’re from and how your family celebrates. A special prayer service is held at synagogue. The shofar, a special instrument made from the horn of a kosher animal (usually a ram), is blown during the Rosh Hashanah service. Tzedakah, or giving charity to people in need, is also part of the holiday. Good deeds are done and charity is given in the hopes that God will seal our names in the “Book of Life,” which brings the promise of a happy year to come. What kinds of foods are eaten on Rosh Hashanah? Food is an important part of Rosh Hashanah. Many special foods are included in a traditional Rosh Hashanah meal as blessings. Sweet foods are eaten to symbolize our hope for a “sweet new year.” We enjoy “new fruit,” a fruit that has recently come into season but we have not yet had the opportunity to enjoy this year (often a pomegranate). The head of a fish is sometimes served, to remind us to be “like the head and not the tail”—so we’ll be leaders, not followers. The fish also symbolizes the translation of Rosh Hashanah, which means “Head of the Year” in Hebrew. A pretty, symbolic bread called challah is baked, sweetened with raisins and braided into a round shape. Apples are dipped in honey, again symbolizing sweetness. All of these traditions are important, because they help to connect us to the deeper meaning of the Rosh Hashanah holiday. See the full post: https://toriavey.com/what-is-rosh-hashanah/#4OeAaR71s6spRhh8.99 See the full post:https://toriavey.com/what-is-rosh-hashanah/#0pyeuU92uvDAQdXo.99
  5. Lindsay

    Labor Day

    Labor Day, an annual celebration of workers and their achievements, originated during one of American labor history’s most dismal chapters. In the late 1800s, at the height of the Industrial Revolution in the United States, the average American worked 12-hour days and seven-day weeks in order to eke out a basic living. Despite restrictions in some states, children as young as 5 or 6 toiled in mills, factories and mines across the country, earning a fraction of their adult counterparts’ wages. People of all ages, particularly the very poor and recent immigrants, often faced extremely unsafe working conditions, with insufficient access to fresh air, sanitary facilities and breaks. As manufacturing increasingly supplanted agriculture as the wellspring of American employment, labor unions, which had first appeared in the late 18th century, grew more prominent and vocal. They began organizing strikes and rallies to protest poor conditions and compel employers to renegotiate hours and pay. Many of these events turned violent during this period, including the infamous Haymarket Riot of 1886, in which several Chicago policemen and workers were killed. Others gave rise to longstanding traditions: On September 5, 1882, 10,000 workers took unpaid time off to march from City Hall to Union Square in New York City, holding the first Labor Day parade in U.S. history. The idea of a “workingmen’s holiday,” celebrated on the first Monday in September, caught on in other industrial centers across the country, and many states passed legislation recognizing it.Congress would not legalize the holiday until 12 years later, when a watershed moment in American labor history brought workers’ rights squarely into the public’s view. On May 11, 1894, employees of the Pullman Palace Car Company in Chicago went on strike to protest wage cuts and the firing of union representatives. On June 26, the American Railroad Union, led by Eugene V. Debs, called for a boycott of all Pullman railway cars, crippling railroad traffic nationwide. To break the strike, the federal government dispatched troops to Chicago, unleashing a wave of riots that resulted in the deaths of more than a dozen workers. In the wake of this massive unrest and in an attempt to repair ties with American workers, Congress passed an act making Labor Day a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories. More than a century later, the true founder of Labor Day has yet to be identified. Many credit Peter J. McGuire, cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, while others have suggested that Matthew Maguire, a secretary of the Central Labor Union, first proposed the holiday. Labor Day is still celebrated in cities and towns across the United States with parades, picnics, barbecues, fireworks displays and other public gatherings. For many Americans, particularly children and young adults, it represents the end of the summer and the start of the back-to-school season. https://www.history.com/topics/holidays/labor-day
  6. Lindsay

    Labor Day

    Labor Day Labor Day pays tribute to the contributions and achievements of American workers, and Labor Day 2018 occurs on Monday, September 3 (it’s traditionally observed on the first Monday in September). It was created by the labor movement in the late 19th century and became a federal holiday in 1894. Labor Day also symbolizes the end of summer for many Americans, and is celebrated with parties, parades and athletic events. A Nationwide Holiday The form that the observance and celebration of Labor Day should take was outlined in the first proposal of the holiday — a street parade to exhibit to the public "the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations" of the community, followed by a festival for the recreation and amusement of the workers and their families. This became the pattern for the celebrations of Labor Day. Speeches by prominent men and women were introduced later, as more emphasis was placed upon the economic and civic significance of the holiday. Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement. The character of the Labor Day celebration has undergone a change in recent years, especially in large industrial centers where mass displays and huge parades have proved a problem. This change, however, is more a shift in emphasis and medium of expression. Labor Day addresses by leading union officials, industrialists, educators, clerics and government officials are given wide coverage in newspapers, radio, and television. The vital force of labor added materially to the highest standard of living and the greatest production the world has ever known and has brought us closer to the realization of our traditional ideals of economic and political democracy. It is appropriate, therefore, that the nation pays tribute on Labor Day to the creator of so much of the nation's strength, freedom, and leadership — the American worker.
  7. Lindsay

    July 4TH

    The Fourth of July—also known as Independence Day or July 4th—has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1941, but the tradition of Independence Day celebrations goes back to the 18th century and the American Revolution. On July 2nd, 1776, the Continental Congress voted in favor of independence, and two days later delegates from the 13 colonies adopted the Declaration of Independence, a historic document drafted by Thomas Jefferson. From 1776 to the present day, July 4th has been celebrated as the birth of American independence, with festivities ranging from fireworks, parades and concerts to more casual family gatherings and barbecues. THE BIRTH OF INDEPENDENCE DAY When the initial battles in the Revolutionary War broke out in April 1775, few colonists desired complete independence from Great Britain, and those who did were considered radical. By the middle of the following year, however, many more colonists had come to favor independence, thanks to growing hostility against Britain and the spread of revolutionary sentiments such as those expressed in the bestselling pamphlet “Common Sense,” published by Thomas Paine in early 1776. On June 7, when the Continental Congress met at the Pennsylvania State House (later Independence Hall) in Philadelphia, the Virginia delegate Richard Henry Lee introduced a motion calling for the colonies’ independence. Amid heated debate, Congress postponed the vote on Lee’s resolution, but appointed a five-man committee—including Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, John Adams of Massachusetts, Roger Sherman of Connecticut, Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania and Robert R. Livingston of New York—to draft a formal statement justifying the break with Great Britain. Did You Know? John Adams believed that July 2nd was the correct date on which to celebrate the birth of American independence, and would reportedly turn down invitations to appear at July 4th events in protest. Adams and Thomas Jefferson both died on July 4, 1826—the 50th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. On July 2nd, the Continental Congress voted in favor of Lee’s resolution for independence in a near-unanimous vote (the New York delegation abstained, but later voted affirmatively). On that day, John Adams wrote to his wife Abigail that July 2 “will be celebrated, by succeeding Generations, as the great anniversary Festival” and that the celebration should include “Pomp and Parade…Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other.” On July 4th, the Continental Congress formally adopted the Declaration of Independence, which had been written largely by Jefferson. Though the vote for actual independence took place on July 2nd, from then on the 4th became the day that was celebrated as the birth of American independence. EARLY FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATIONS In the pre-Revolutionary years, colonists had held annual celebrations of the king’s birthday, which traditionally included the ringing of bells, bonfires, processions and speechmaking. By contrast, during the summer of 1776 some colonists celebrated the birth of independence by holding mock funerals for King George III, as a way of symbolizing the end of the monarchy’s hold on America and the triumph of liberty. Festivities including concerts, bonfires, parades and the firing of cannons and muskets usually accompanied the first public readings of the Declaration of Independence, beginning immediately after its adoption. Philadelphia held the first annual commemoration of independence on July 4, 1777, while Congress was still occupied with the ongoing war. George Washington issued double rations of rum to all his soldiers to mark the anniversary of independence in 1778, and in 1781, several months before the key American victory at Yorktown, Massachusetts became the first state to make July 4th an official state holiday. After the Revolutionary War, Americans continued to commemorate Independence Day every year, in celebrations that allowed the new nation’s emerging political leaders to address citizens and create a feeling of unity. By the last decade of the 18th century, the two major political parties—Federalists and Democratic-Republicans—that had arisen began holding separate Fourth of July celebrations in many large cities. FOURTH OF JULY BECOMES A NATIONAL HOLIDAY The tradition of patriotic celebration became even more widespread after the War of 1812, in which the United States again faced Great Britain. In 1870, the U.S. Congress made July 4th a federal holiday; in 1941, the provision was expanded to grant a paid holiday to all federal employees. Over the years, the political importance of the holiday would decline, but Independence Day remained an important national holiday and a symbol of patriotism. Falling in mid-summer, the Fourth of July has since the late 19th century become a major focus of leisure activities and a common occasion for family get-togethers, often involving fireworks and outdoor barbecues. The most common symbol of the holiday is the American flag, and a common musical accompaniment is “The Star-Spangled Banner,” the national anthem of the United States. VIDEOPLAY VIDEO Writing of Declaration of Independence VIDEOPLAY VIDEO History of the Fourth of July VIDEOPLAY VIDEO History of the Fourth of July NEWS Independence Day at the White House: 5 Fourth of July Tales VIDEOPLAY VIDEO The Origin of Fireworks © 2018, A&E Television Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
  8. Lindsay

    PTSD Awareness Day

    National PTSD Awareness Day is celebrated annually on June 27. It aims to raise awareness of posttraumatic stress disorder, a mental health problem that may develop after a person has been exposed to one or more traumatic events. Traumatic events that may cause PTSD include physical or sexual assault, war-related combat stress, terrorism, natural or man-made disasters, and other threats on a person’s life. Typical symptoms of PTSD include distressing dreams, persistent thoughts and recurring flashbacks about the traumatic event or events, numbing or avoidance of memories of the trauma, triggered emotional responses, persistent hyper-arousal.The first National PTSD Awareness Day was held on June 27, 2010. This observance was officially established by the Congress. In addition, the National Center for PTSD has designated June as PTSD Awareness Month. National PTSD Awareness Day aims to raise public awareness about the disorder, educate a wide audience about PTSD and provide people affected by PTSD with access to proper treatment. How to help raise PTSD awareness? You can start with learning key information about PTSD, its causes and treatment options. Then share your knowledge with others, promote PTSD awareness via social networks and reach out to help those who need it. In Pennsylvania, June 27 is commemorated as Helen Keller Day. Helen Keller was an American author, lecturer and political activist. She is noted for being the first deafblind person to earn a B.A. degree. Helen Adams Keller was born on June 27, 1880. She lost her ability to see and hear at 19 months old due to an illness (either meningitis or scarlet fever). In 1886, Keller’s mother started looking for a person who could educate her daughter. Anne Sullivan, herself visually impaired, agreed to become Keller’s instructor. Keller attended several schools for the blind and deaf. At age 20, she was admitted to Radcliffe College in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She graduated in 1904, becoming the first deafblind person to earn a B.A. degree.Keller learned to speak and spent much of her life giving lectures and speeches. She was an avid advocate of people with disabilities. In 1915, she founded Helen Keller International, an organization devoted to research in vision, nutrition and health.In 1980, President Jimmy Carter authorized Helen Keller Day at the federal level to commemorate the centennial of Keller’s birth. That year, the United States Postal service issued a special stamp depicting Helen Keller and Ann Sullivan.
  9. until
    Post-traumatic Stress Awareness The United States Senate designated June 27 as National PTSD Awareness Day and The National Center for Post-traumatic Stress Disorder has designated June as PTSD Awareness Month. What can you do if you or someone you care about needs help for PTSD? There are organizations and resources that can help both individuals and professionals discover ways to identify and manage PTSD symptoms. June is National PTSD Awareness Month EMDR Therapist Directory, EMDR Therapy Blog, EMDRIA.org FacebookLinkedInTwitterPinterestGoogle+Share Did you know June is National PTSD Awareness Month? PTSD Awareness Month is a national campaign devoted to bringing more awareness and knowledge about PTSD to everyone. What is PTSD? PTSD stands for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. People may develop PTSD when they are exposed or witness something traumatic like war, physical violence, sexual violence, auto accidents and much more. After such events, a person may start suffering from symptoms if they were unable to process what happened to them or what they witnessed. The symptoms might include: Disturbing memories, thought Nightmares Have trouble sleeping Feel irritable or angry Have trouble concentrating Feel hyper-vigilant or on guard for fear of danger Experience flashback memories There is a website www.ptsd.va.gov that has been set up to help people learn more about PTSD and treatment options. Once treatment option that they talk about is EMDR Therapy. EMDR Therapy is an Evidence Based Treatment, which means that there is research that backs up the efficacy of using EMDR Therapy to treat PTSD successfully. What is EMDR Therapy? EMDR Therapy (or Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Therapy) is an integrative therapy that helps people heal from Traumatic events as well as, life disturbing experiences. Discovered by Dr. Francine Shapiro, EMDR Therapy has gottenworldwide attention for helping millions of people heal from PTSD (Posttraumatic Stress Disorder) caused from traumatic events, such as; rape, sexual abuse, auto accidents and combat. EMDR Therapy can also help people who feel distress in their lives to heal and feel more whole after events that have been disturbing such as; divorce, life transitions, grief, anxiety and much more. When people are experiencing distress in their lives and can’t find a way to fix it on their own, they end up coming in for EMDR Therapy. Sometimes events happen in a person’s life and he/she struggles to find a way to integrate that incident. That event can become an unprocessed memory and get stored in the brain creating symptoms that are uncomfortable. Physical sensations, emotions, thoughts, and images associated with the event can get locked into the brain, and without treatment, may lead to distressing symptoms and behaviors. EMDR Therapy is designed to help a person identify and process these stuck pieces so that the symptoms can decrease and one can feel more alive and less distressed. EMDR Therapy helps facilitate the activation of the brain’s inherent system to process and integrate the information that got stored or stuck. EMDR Therapy will not erase the memory; rather you will be able to remember the story without all the emotional charge that was distressing before the treatment. Resources for PTSD As a part of National PTSD Awareness Month, it is important to help those who are suffering from PTSD find the resources they need to start the healing process. EMDR Therapy is one of the many resources available to help those suffering from PTSD. If you (or someone you know) may want to learn more about or experience EMDR Therapy, please search the EMDR Therapist Directory on this website to find a trained EMDR Therapist in your area. Here are other resources available to learn more about PTSD and EMDR Therapy: VA National Center for PTSD About Face NIMH (National Institute of Mental Health) NAMI.org (National Alliance on Mental Illness) EMDRIA.org (EMDR International Association) Follow the hashtag #PTSDAwarenessMonth to join the conversation on Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook.
  10. Lindsay

    Genesite

    What is GeneSight®? GeneSight is a genetic-based laboratory developed test that analyzes a person’s DNA, and matches it with known pharmacology about how medications work, to help healthcare providers develop an individualized treatment plan for their patients. The GeneSight report uses color-coding to show which medicines may be more likely to work for a patient based on his/her genetic makeup. The GeneSight report also contains helpful information about how an individual’s genetic makeup may affect dosage based on an analysis of certain genes. Click here to view a sample patient report. Will the same medicine that worked for someone I’m related to (mom/dad/sister/brother) work for me? Not necessarily. Each person has a unique set of genes and genetic responses to medications. You may share genetic similarities with your relatives, but each of you has a different genetic makeup and metabolism. Your genes influence the way your body may respond to a specific medication. So a medication that works for your relative may not necessarily work for you. How do my genes affect which medication may work for me? Your genes may affect the way medications work in your body—some medications could work better with your unique genetic profile and some medicines might not work at all for you. Your genes also can affect how quickly your body breaks down (metabolizes) medicine and gets medicine into your bloodstream. For example, codeine can be an effective painkiller for some people. However, for about 10 percent of people, it has no effect whatsoever (Source: National Institutes of Health). When a medication doesn’t work with your genes, you may not get the relief you need and you may have unwanted side effects. By gathering information about your genetic profile, you and your healthcare provider may be better informed in making your treatment selection. Medicines that align well with your genes may work better and with fewer side effects. How could GeneSight help me? GeneSight gives your healthcare provider important information to help plan your treatment. GeneSight is designed to help him/her get you on the right medicine faster with fewer unwanted side effects. GeneSight analyzes your genes and then matches the information about your genes to a list of medications that may be available treatment options for your condition. The report provides information to your healthcare provider about which medications may work better with your genes and how your body might process those medications. That gives your healthcare provider additional insight to help select the medications that may work best for you. What is the test like? Is it invasive? The test is easy to administer and takes about five minutes. Your DNA is collected using a simple cheek swab which you can do yourself. Your clinician’s office will then send your sample to the Assurex Health clinical lab to be analyzed. How long will it take to get the results? Once Assurex Health receives your sample, they will complete the analysis and send a report to your healthcare provider within 36 hours. Will my healthcare provider share the results with me? Yes, you and your clinician will go over the GeneSight results together. On this website, you can find a lot of helpful information about genes, pharmacogenomics and the GeneSight test. How will my healthcare provider use the information from GeneSight to treat me? The report is one piece of information that your healthcare provider can use to create an individualized treatment plan for you. He/she will use the report to help guide the selection of the medication for you. With GeneSight, your healthcare provider can identify which medications may be more effective and may be less likely to have unwanted side effects. If my relative (mom/dad/sister/brother) had a GeneSight test, can my clinician use those results to treat me? No. Each person has a unique combination of genes that could affect how he or she may react to certain medications. You will need to have your own GeneSight test. Are the results of my GeneSight report confidential? Yes. GeneSight takes privacy and security very seriously. That’s why we analyze all GeneSight tests at our own accredited lab, so we can ensure the quality and security of your test. Your genetic information is private and protected through various federal laws including HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) and GINA (Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act) that ensure the security of your personal and genetic information. Is this test covered by my insurance? GeneSight is reimbursed by a number of government and commercial insurance plans. Assurex Health also developed the GeneSight Financial Assistance Program to help make GeneSight affordable for patients who qualify. You can learn more by calling the GeneSight Customer Service team at 866.757.9204 for assistance. I hope this information helps Members. ~Lindsay, Forum Super Administrator
  11. Hello @sophie, I live in an area where the gated community must mow the lawns weekly and it triggers my poodles terribly, where they go on barking fits and go from window to window. In turn, It triggers me immensely, flaring up my fibro! I would love to find a quiet space in the country, just for my poodles and I. Have a good rest of the weekend, ~Lindsay
  12. "I am only one, but I am one. I cannot do everything, but I can do something. And because I cannot do everything, I will not refuse to do the something that I can do".                        ~ Edward Everett Hale

    💗

    ~Lindsay

    1. LeilaNadine

      LeilaNadine

      I love this 

  13. PCC ELERT/05.18.18 Are Mixed Symptoms a Red Flag for Conversion of Postpartum Depression to Bipolar Disorder? Verinder Sharma, MBBS @Hypomanic and @manic symptoms are common in the @postpartum period and can occur alone or in combination with symptoms of @depression. Here, case histories are presented of 2 women with mixed depression who were previously treated with @antidepressants but developed mood instability after retrials of previously effective and well-tolerated antidepressants.
  14. It's good to 'see' you KS.  I hope you are doing well!

    💓

    ~Lindsay

  15. Lindsay

    Flag Day

    The History of the American Flag On June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress passed an act establishing an official flag for the new nation. The resolution stated: “Resolved, that the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation." On Aug. 3, 1949, President Harry S. Truman officially declared June 14 as Flag Day. The history of our flag is as fascinating as that of the American Republic itself. It has survived battles, inspired songs and evolved in response to the growth of the country it represents. The following is a collection of interesting facts and customs about the American flag and how it is to be displayed: Origins Old Glory The origin of the first American flag is unknown. Some historians believe it was designed by New Jersey Congressman Francis Hopkinson and sewn by Philadelphia seamstress Betsy Ross. The name Old Glory was given to a large, 10-by-17-foot flag by its owner, William Driver, a sea captain from Massachusetts. Inspiring the common nickname for all American flags, Driver’s flag is said to have survived multiple attempts to deface it during the Civil War. Driver was able to fly the flag over the Tennessee Statehouse once the war ended. The flag is a primary artifact at the National Museum of American History and was last displayed in Tennessee by permission of the Smithsonian at an exhibition in 2006. Between 1777 and 1960 Congress passed several acts that changed the shape, design and arrangement of the flag and allowed stars and stripes to be added to reflect the admission of each new state. Today the flag consists of 13 horizontal stripes, seven red alternating with six white. The stripes represent the original 13 Colonies and the stars represent the 50 states of the Union. The colors of the flag are symbolic as well; red symbolizes hardiness and valor, white symbolizes purity and innocence, and blue represents vigilance, perseverance and justice. The National Museum of American History has undertaken a long-term preservation project of the enormous 1814 garrison flag that survived the 25-hour shelling of Fort McHenry in Baltimore by British troops and inspired Francis Scott Key to compose "The Star-Spangled Banner." Often referred to by that name, the flag had become soiled and weakened over time and was removed from the museum in December 1998. This preservation effort began in earnest in June 1999, and continues to this day. The flag is now stored at a 10-degree angle in a special low-oxygen, filtered light chamber and is periodically examined at a microscopic level to detect signs of decay or damage within its individual fibers. There are a few locations where the U.S. flag is flown 24 hours a day, by either presidential proclamation or by law: - Fort McHenry, National Monument and Historic Shrine, Baltimore, Maryland - Flag House Square, Baltimore, Maryland - United States Marine Corps Memorial (Iwo Jima), Arlington, Virginia - On the Green of the Town of Lexington, Massachusetts - The White House, Washington, D.C. - United States customs ports of entry - Grounds of the National Memorial Arch in Valley Forge State Park, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania Inspiration After a British bombardment, amateur poet Francis Scott Key was so inspired by the sight of the American flag still flying over Baltimore's Fort McHenry that he wrote "The Star-Spangled Banner" on Sept. 14, 1814. It officially became our national anthem in 1931. In 1892, the flag inspired James B. Upham and Francis Bellamy to write The Pledge of Allegiance. It was first published in a magazine called The Youth's Companion. On Distant Shores NASA In 1909, Robert Peary placed an American flag, sewn by his wife, at the North Pole. He also left pieces of another flag along the way. It is the only time a person has been honored for cutting the flag. In 1963, Barry Bishop placed the American flag on top of Mount Everest. In July 1969, the American flag was "flown" in space when Neil Armstrong placed it on the moon. Flags were placed on the lunar surface on each of six manned landings during the Apollo program. The first time the American flag was flown overseas on a foreign fort was in Libya, over Fort Derne, on the shores of Tripoli in 1805. Displaying the Stars and Stripes The flag is usually displayed from sunrise to sunset. It should be raised briskly and lowered ceremoniously. In inclement weather, the flag should not be flown. The flag should be displayed daily and on all holidays, weather permitting, on or near the main administration buildings of all public institutions. It should also be displayed in or near every polling place on election days and in or near every schoolhouse during school days. When displayed flat against a wall or a window, or in a vertical orientation, the “union” field of stars should be uppermost and to the left of the observer. When the flag is raised or lowered as part of a ceremony, and as it passes by in parade or review, everyone, except those in uniform, should face the flag with the right hand over the heart. The U.S. flag should never be dipped toward any person or object, nor should the flag ever touch anything beneath it. Old Glory Photo Credit: Hugh Talman / NMAH, SI NASA Photo Credit: Courtesy of nasa.gov
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