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Darrith

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Everything posted by Darrith

  1. Hey there CD7 This is always a tough one, especially if you are just starting out with depression symptoms. I am sorry you had a bad pre Christmas bout of depression. The answer to this question is simple: My answer? straight to the point: Yes, medication works! You just have to find the right combination and the correct dose, and you will be "A" for away. In this modern day and age, with the correct guidance of a Psychiatrist, or even a good GP, you will easily settle into a decent medical regime. However, if the side effects are too severe; after having tried the various cocktails, then consider a change. Perhaps a herbal alternative. All the best... and give the meds a chance. Don't let "The Big Black Dog" get you down...
  2. Hi there, Dealingwithlife. Sounds like Mania. I have just come off a similar bout. From a relationship, re discovery. It sound nice, with all the energy, I loved it, but if one is not careful, it can actually burn one out. The Psychiatrist warned me, and placed me on a low dose popular anti epileptic for the mild mania episode, which I hated taking, as it slows me down too much with the other meds. So I didn't take them, and instead worked through it. But I am over it now. Just wanted to say I can relate, and I wish you all the best.
  3. At first, taking Seroquel during the day will knock you like a ton of bricks. But eventually if you be patient and persevere, also depending on how your body responds to this drug, the zombie tired feeling will get a bit better. I am on 300 mg twice a day. I have stopped taking my morning dose, but If I feel an anxiety or irritability coming on during the day, I will take half, = 150mg. I will initially feel tired, but then it transforms into a calmness and a feeling of “I couldn’t give a damn about the problem at hand.” My 300mg night time dose puts me into a deep sleep every night which I love! Seroquel is not for everyone. It will take trial and error and a bit of adjustment here and there, but ultimately it is a miracle drug for certain individuals, me being one of them. At first, taking Seroquel during the day will knock you like a ton of bricks. But eventually if you be patient and persevere, also depending on how your body responds to this drug, the zombie tired feeling will get a bit better. I am on 300 mg twice a day. I have stopped taking my morning dose, but If I feel an anxiety or irritability coming on during the day, I will take half, = 150mg. I will initially feel tired, but then it transforms into a calmness and a feeling of “I couldn’t give a damn about the problem at hand.” My 300mg night time dose puts me into a deep sleep every night which I love! Seroquel is not for everyone. It will take trial and error and a bit of adjustment here and there, but ultimately it is a miracle drug for certain individuals, me being one of them.
  4. Drugs, both legal and illegal. I don't do illegal drugs anymore.
  5. I would have more friends. I only have one friend who lives 600km's from me. I would go out more with my family, to simple places, like the beach or for walks. I would take more risks like changing my civil servant job where I have served for 30 years. I would have more energy I would be a different more happy person. But instead I have depression / Bipolar 2.
  6. Hi there Icdream. I have exactly the same thoughts, almost on a daily basis. In between these thoughts, I get suicidal thoughts. Now I understand why some people end their lives before they get to that dreaded old age. Unfortunately I don't have the answer. My only relief are the medications I am on but medication does not relive this thinking completely. I hope you find the necessary treatment. All the best.
  7. Hi there Lilaccrystal. I think the advice of Northern Star is very sound. I was emotionally and physically abused as a child by my father until my parents got divorced when I was 12. I carry the emotional scars even to this day. So I can relate to you. I hope you find the appropriate treatement. All the best!
  8. That's the problem with hallucinations / delusions, you believe what you see, or hear even though it does not exist. I am not saying you have hallucinations, but you cannot rule that out completely unless you have been properly diagnosed.
  9. It can take months for this medicine to take full effect and to cause the depression to settle. I think this is a generic of the SSRI am on. Keep persevering.
  10. Hi there usman36 I am a little OCD. I found that no type of special thinking helps. My medication is the only thing that really calms down the OCD thoughts.
  11. While this makes good theory, I cannot do this. i cannot induce worry for 10 minutes, then turn the swich off again. Once the worry wheel is set in motion, it is very hard to stop.
  12. I saw a colleague at work develop TD. He would sit in a long meeting and twitch, force a few huge smiles with teeth blazing, then lick his lips and rapidly blink. He was on anti psychotics for years. Other colleagues used to mock him behind his back. Seeing that, and taking an anti psychotic myself, has made me very aware of developing TD. Every time I roll my tongue during the ordinary course of the day, I wonder, "Is this the onset of TD? If I got TD, I would move from an introvert to a complete recluse as there is now way I can live without my medicine which keeps me sane. So, Grey Coyote, I would get it checked out ASAP.
  13. Hi there Slayers and welcome here to DF. It sound like you need more time with your GP, or preferably with a psychiatrist who will know what medications to supplement with the Bupropion XL 150 mgs. A small adjustment with medication can often make a big difference.
  14. I like to be alone, but I don't want to be a lonely person...I can get by with the company of my wife, my daughter and our three dogs. A visit from a friend now and again is sufficient for me.
  15. If anyone cannot sleep after taking 150 to 300mg's Seroquel, then they have a serious sleeping problem. As an insomniac myself, I find Seroquel to be a fantastic sleep inducer. (I don't take it primarily for sleep) Remron is also very effective. The two combined are just perfect for me. I wake up each morning refreshed after a good night's sleep.
  16. I can relate. Feeling unwarranted guilt is a big symptom of my depression. I mainly feel guilty that I am a bad father, a bad husband and a bad employee despite people telling me that in these three areas I am actually doing quite well. Sometimes while I am eating a meal alone in a bistro while at work, I will feel an immense sense of guilt. I have read enough to have learned that guilt is a definite symptom of depression. Fortunately, my medication seems to take the edge off the guilt somewhat.
  17. I am often paranoid that my wife is cheating on me. I have to force myself to think otherwise...
  18. Hi there Logic 215 I hear you. I can relate completely. This is the very nature of depression at its peak. The good news is that in most cases, the depressed go through a "roller coaster ride", meaning you are probably at a very low point now, but you will get out of the dark pit eventually and things will pan out. If you have more to share, get it out here. I find it very helpful to unpack here and to read how others cope.
  19. Discussing the fact that you have depression while using your real name anywhere on the web is just one big no-no. I strongly agree with the previous posts. I say this especially if you have even the most mediocre of reputation to try and preserve. It may later be held against you in many dimensions from court proceedings, to divorce, to making new friends. I have seen a senior employee at my work lose his job from one silly Tweet. Among my peers, work colleagues and new acquaintances, I certainly would not spread it around as if it were good news -- as if it were "cool". Or wear a sign on my head. However, if one has depression with sound judgement, one will know when the timing is right and with whom you may share that you have this still massively, over stigmatised condition. (In its many, many integrated forms) Here is another take -- Will you tell others that you have piles, vaginal thrush or rotten toe nails? No! Some ailments are just not discussed unless you are really close to someone, and they must know. In a way I can understand why people who do not have depression related disease (I steer from the words: “normal people” – What is “Normal?) think negatively about those that do. Will you employ an applicant for a post at your company who suffers from OCD and Personality disorder? Will you be content if a paediatrician who suffers from Major depression, OCD, and acute anxiety treats your child? At a party, if you hear a person has Borderline personality issues with prevailing anger, will you feel comfortable? This topic is thought provoking and I would like to delve deeper into it. The bottom line is -- don’t advertise it as it just does not feel right and it will prevent opportunities in life. Unfortunately this is the world we live in. Its the nature of the illness that is so scary to society. It is a brain disorder -- Everything starts in the mind... If you need to get it out rather unpack it here, under a pseudonym. Nice topic
  20. I have started and stopped many interesting hobbies over the years, to mention a few: Body building, tropical fish, mountain hiking, tobacco pipe collecting, photography and poetry. My depression, anxiety and apathy are factors that have caused me to quit these hobbies. In my late forties, I have no desire to do any serious hobbies anymore, People may call me lazy, but I now know, it is all part of the depression package. The few things I do to keep myself busy, if they can even be called hobbies are: surfing the internet, partaking in forum discussions such as these, but on other sites, (I enjoy the invisible interaction) watching documentaries on TV, following top international rugby and cricket, ( I am a Springbok die hard) reading, a bit of gardening, and the odd camping trip.
  21. I strongly recommend seeing a psychiatrist and allowing him or her to manage your depression. GP's have limited knowledge of depression, especially when it comes to prescribing anti psychotic medication which you may or may not need. Some GP's actually steer clear of treating a person with heavy depression or associated disorders simply because they are not specialists in the field of mental illness.
  22. Factors that triggered off my depression, besides genetics are: I was raised in a tumultuous marriage with a verbally, physically abusive, fearful and over controlling father. Working in a dead end job for many years where grossly unfair affirmative action is now vigorously applied. Marriage difficulties (I am still married, and it is getting better) Lack of self confidence. (I used to be a very confident person, but this has crumbled over the past decade.) Other factors that manifest which I cannot work out, perhaps wrong thinking, or insufficient therapy from a psychologist. For me, somehow this is actually a hard question to answer.
  23. There are only two articles on the web on this relatively new drug – Quetoser, which is a generic by Cipla for the world famous Seroquel. So I thought I would be the third person to write a little on my experience of it. If you Google Seroquel, you will read about 50 to 60% negative reviews. You will learn about the side effects – heart problems, blood sugar issues, weight gain, eye problems, and, and , and a long list. There are stories about civil suits, and a mother who lost her young son. My take: “If the benefits outweigh the side effects, take it!” In short Seroquel is used for Schizophrenia, Bi Polar and for other “off label” diagnoses, namely depression, insomnia, OCD and anxiety. It is prescribed more loosely these days for a wide range of depression related ailments. You will also read many success stories by Seroquel users. While in hospital for a recent bout of depression, anxiety and (new diagnosis) Bi Polar 2, I was given Quetoser, which I quickly learned was the generic for Seroquel. The first few days in hospital I started on a high dose, 200mg. It felt like a train had hit me. All I wanted to do was sleep. Which I did, a lot of. Then it was pushed up to 300mg twice a day. Of course, I was on other meds too, so it was hard to gauge what exact effect the combination had on me. I saw recovering drug addicts in hospital sitting on chairs with their eyes closed, heads cocked one side, drewling from Ouetoser. I learned very quickly that Quetoser was a powerful anti psychotic. I left the hospital with my Quetoser prescription. The RX said take two by 300ml a day. The next day I took it in the morning and ventured out on my motorbike. Big mistake. I turned back. It undoubtedly impaired my driving ability to unlawful proportions. My next day at work saw me hanging onto door frames to stay on my feet. At night I slept like a baby with only a few groggy hard to wake up mornings. Nothing a bit of coffee could not sort out. This stuff is fantastic for insomnia, even in low doses. Ironically, high doses have an anti psychotic effect, while low doses have more of an anti-histamine kind of sleepy effect. It made me very lazy in the beginning, to the extent that I struggled to do basic house hold chores. My body eventually slowly but swiftly built up a resistance after about 17 to 20 days. After 8 months, I am able to take one during the day at work if I am having a really challenging day. But then I must focus and stay busy, as I may get sleepy. Some days are different to others. My night dose is most welcome -- after one hour I MUST sleep and I get a good 8 hours of glorious sleep. This medicine is a G-d send for me. It keeps my moods stable, my anxiety low, my irritability even lower, slows down the racing thoughts, helps me get an awesome night’s sleep (with the occasional weird dreams I might add) and generally removes the intrusive depressive thoughts. Everyone is different. My experience may be totally different to someone else my age. Oh yes, the side effects! I have gained about 10 Kilograms, and it does tend to evoke a ravenous appetite. But I have always been a thin guy, so I don’t really mind. I must just watch myself, that don’t gain more. Price wise? A lot cheaper than Seroquel! But for me, very effective, even though I have never taken the real deal-- Seroquel.
  24. Welcome Bizarro I am sure you will find as much support and acceptance here as I have. All the best.
  25. Right now, I am listening to the sounds of silence...
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