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So now they know. (Or do they?)

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Tymothi

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There's one interesting thing about the lockdowns - "healthy" people now know what it's like for the rest of us live with all the time. To not be able to connect with the people we care about.... to be trapped and isolated in a shell of our own creation.... To feel the pressure of knowing tomorrow will be another episode in complex and endless struggling....

 

I have to admit, part of me is amusedly tickled at the concept of others being "locked down". Not in a vengeful way, mind you (like, ha ha! Suckers! You can't enjoy your life either now! Ha ha!), just in the way that now they know what I've known all along - that it's disgusting to be around people. That getting too close to someone is liable to invite monstrous suffering and empty your soul of whatever will to live you once had. Maybe they will start washing their hands now, or standing more than six inches from me at the Barnes & Noble register. Maybe? Dare I hope?

 

Another part of me believes it won't make any difference. Ambitious people and those who are able to cruise through with futures and families and attractive functional bodies have simply found other ways to disorient themselves and keep afloat their lively lives, and as soon as they have the chance, they will be doing everything they were doing before. 

 

Will people change for the long-term, or will it just take a little longer for the haves to neglect the have-nots?

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No people won't change for the long term.  Soon this "South Park episode" will be over and we will have to put up with some other insane situation that people will make worse than we could ever imagine.

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It is a South Park episode. Or an SNL skit, or a Monty Python gag, or a Spinal Tap joke. Except it's not funny.

 

What gets me is that there was all this other stuff happening right before the apocalypse that all seemed so very important. Like, didn't the US **** some major Iranian general and we were all about to start thinking McCarthyist global nuclear holocaust? What happened to all that? What happened to the Hong Kong riots, or the crimes against refugees in Myanmar? Nobody's talking about that now, but right before the pandemic everybody had an opinion. What's the matter, they don't care anymore? Just because they can't find toilet paper?

 

Most people's minds can't keep up with any more than one person: themselves.

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Yes you're right or what happened to Kim Jong Un?  This is a world of misdirection.  Look over there so you don't see what we're doing in the other direction.  I 100% believe the coronavirus is real but they have used it every step of the way for a long list of agendas.  While it's nonstop coronavirus talk on the news they could get away with doing anything right now.

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The non-diagnosed are struggling with Covid-related mental health conditions that resemble our own. I know that because I'm hearing from them. Most aren't struggling out in the open, too risky, so much fear. A large number are reaching out to helplines, though.

I think some people's perspectives about mental health will shift. I don't know if that includes more compassion on the part of neurotypicals, but surely a better understanding. Like us, they have no clue as to when this will end and they can go back go their baseline again. Stigma remains an obstacle, they do not wish to envision themselves as being like us  and I think that separation limits empathy. 

 

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On 7/2/2020 at 4:02 AM, Atra said:

The non-diagnosed are struggling with Covid-related mental health conditions that resemble our own. I know that because I'm hearing from them. Most aren't struggling out in the open, too risky, so much fear. A large number are reaching out to helplines, though.

I think some people's perspectives about mental health will shift. I don't know if that includes more compassion on the part of neurotypicals, but surely a better understanding. Like us, they have no clue as to when this will end and they can go back go their baseline again. Stigma remains an obstacle, they do not wish to envision themselves as being like us  and I think that separation limits empathy. 

 

This is a good way to put it. You'd think it would bring us closer together, help us feel more alike. And maybe for some, it does. But I doubt the average neyrotypical is looking at it that way. They might even be even more resentful because it's starting to make sense, and they will feel bad because of the way they've looked at us for so long.

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8 hours ago, Tymothi said:

They might even be even more resentful because it's starting to make sense, and they will feel bad because of the way they've looked at us for so long.

A good insight, thanks. I hadn't considered this. What human being would be eager to rethink and conclude that their judgments were misguided? Maybe it's more comfortable for most neurotypicals to view their mental health as temporary dysregulation. When living conditions return to the way they were? They assume they'll go back to being "normal", while we'll remain "nutjobs". 

Feels jaded to assume this applies to all, though. I choose to believe in this abnormal time, I can make a small difference.

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