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Former Bengal helps kick off campaign for mental health levy

Former Bengal helps kick off campaign for mental health levy FAIRFIELD — OCT 8 — The Butler County Mental Health Board tonight will kick off its campaign to pass a 1-mill levy Nov. 7 with a real kicker — former Cincinnati Bengal Jim Breech. A resident of Liberty Twp., Breech will speak at the board’s invitation-only kick off from 6 to 8 p.m. tonight at Receptions Conference & Banquet Center, 5975 Boymel Drive in Fairfield.

“I was particularly concerned as a resident to learn that the levy first passed in 1985 is only producing the equivalent of less than one-fourth of a mill at a time the county’s population has increased by 30 percent,” Breech said. “As a resident, I have to be concerned that people who need help are not getting the help they need.”

At its effective .22-mill rate, the existing .5-mill levy — passed in 1985 and last renewed in 2004 — generates .2 million for the board each year, Executive Director Terry Royer said. The owner of a 0,000 home currently pays .95 a year for the existing mental health levy, compared with .66 for the mentally disabled or .74 for children social services, according to county auditor records.

If approved, the new levy would cost .62 per year for the owner of a 0,000 home, Royer said. It will generate .5 million annually to save and expand existing services, he said.

If the proposed five-year 1-mill levy fails, the board will need to close a FAIRFIELD — OCT 8 — The Butler County Mental Health Board tonight will kick off its campaign to pass a 1-mill levy Nov. 7 with a real kicker — former Cincinnati Bengal Jim Breech. A resident of Liberty Twp., Breech will speak at the board’s invitation-only kick off from 6 to 8 p.m. tonight at Receptions Conference & Banquet Center, 5975 Boymel Drive in Fairfield.

“I was particularly concerned as a resident to learn that the levy first passed in 1985 is only producing the equivalent of less than one-fourth of a mill at a time the county’s population has increased by 30 percent,” Breech said. “As a resident, I have to be concerned that people who need help are not getting the help they need.”

At its effective .22-mill rate, the existing .5-mill levy — passed in 1985 and last renewed in 2004 — generates $2.2 million for the board each year, Executive Director Terry Royer said. The owner of a $100,000 home currently pays $6.95 a year for the existing mental health levy, compared with $76.66 for the mentally disabled or $56.74 for children social services, according to county auditor records.

If approved, the new levy would cost $30.62 per year for the owner of a $100,000 home, Royer said. It will generate $7.5 million annually to save and expand existing services, he said.

If the proposed five-year 1-mill levy fails, the board will need to close a $1.8 million deficit, which follows $2.9 million in cuts over the past five years.

Supportive services such as the diversion courts for the mentally ill and funding to serve those who can’t afford insurance and don’t qualify for Medicaid are on the chopping block, Royer said,

SOURCE:-
By Candice Brooks
Staff Writer

©2006 Cox Ohio Publishing, Dayton, Ohio, USA
.8 million deficit, which follows .9 million in cuts over the past five years.

Supportive services such as the diversion courts for the mentally ill and funding to serve those who can’t afford insurance and don’t qualify for Medicaid are on the chopping block, Royer said,

SOURCE:-
By Candice Brooks
Staff Writer

©2006 Cox Ohio Publishing, Dayton, Ohio, USA

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