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Enjoy The Holidays Without Depression or Stress Plus 10 Tips for Coping

Enjoy The Holidays Without

Depression or Stress

Plus 10 Tips for Coping

 

  ‘Tis the season? People are now starting to prepare as they are preparing to shop shop for gifts now, getting ready to cook for their loved ones and basically seeing all the ads on TV. It’s Thanksgiving, Christmas, Chanukah  once again and everyone’s joining in the holiday festivities. Everyone except you. This only means one thing: you’ve got holiday season depression. It’s a type of seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, that affects individuals everywhere.

It’s common for some people to feel sad, anxious, and uneasy when the yuletide season comes, but you have to admit it’s no fun. While everyone’s enjoying themselves, you’re busy being as mean as old Mr. Scrooge.

The Grinch Complex

You might not be as spiteful as the Grinch and you surely have no intentions of wrecking havoc like what he did to Whoville, but you’re just as sourly, as bitter and as miserable as he is. Of course, there’s always a reason why you feel that way. Here are some possible reasons for your holiday season depression.

 

Depression or Stress

Plus 10 Tips for Coping

 

 ‘Tis the season? People are now starting to prepare as they are preparing to shop shop for gifts now, getting ready to cook for their loved ones and basically seeing all the ads on TV. It’s Thanksgiving, Christmas, Chanukah  once again and everyone’s joining in the holiday festivities. Everyone except you. This only means one thing: you’ve got holiday season depression. It’s a type of seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, that affects individuals everywhere.

It’s common for some people to feel sad, anxious, and uneasy when the yuletide season comes, but you have to admit it’s no fun. While everyone’s enjoying themselves, you’re busy being as mean as old Mr. Scrooge.

The Grinch Complex

You might not be as spiteful as the Grinch and you surely have no intentions of wrecking havoc like what he did to Whoville, but you’re just as sourly, as bitter and as miserable as he is. Of course, there’s always a reason why you feel that way. Here are some possible reasons for your holiday season depression.

  • Stress and fatigue
  • Financial stress
  • Unrealistic expectations
  • Overcommercialization
  • Not being with your friends and family

One of these may be the reason why you’re so blue during the happy season. Lighten up; it’s the season to be jolly, after all! Here are some helpful tactics to help shoo away that depressing feeling.

Organize

While many people go through the holiday with much caution and careful planning, there are some who just take it easy. They put things off at the last minute, do not make lists for holiday buys and spendings and don’t set schedules anything. While this can turn out all right, oftentimes it backfires. All the frenzied planning and rushing around will leave you more stressed than ever. Soon, you’ll be slumped in a corner, feeling drained and depressed.

The key to avoid this is to be organized. Make sure you pace yourself and set time for activities and chores that need to be done. Create a doable timetable and an easy-to-manage schedule. If you need help, don’t hesitate to ask people around you. It’s the season of sharing anyway, so they surely won’t mind sharing a few tasks with you.

Another effective tip is to make lists. It seems like a geeky thing to do, but it’ll help you in the long run. Make a list of all the people you’re going to give gifts to, and those you need to invite to your holiday party. Prepare another one for your grocery and make sure you provide alternative items. Lists help keep you and your budget on the right track and make sure you’ve got everything covered–including your own peace of mind during the joyful season.

Be With The Ones You Love

Why do you think Ebenezer Scrooge is grumpy during the holidays? It’s because he spends all his time alone in his house, lonely and miserable. If you act the same way, chances are you’ll end up like him.

It’s easy to feel depressed and angry when you’re all alone. That’s why when the holidays come, you should make plans to spend it with the people closest to your heart. Go home to your family, or ask your friends to join you at your home. Christmas is the season of love. When you’re surrounded with happy and cheerful people who love you, there won’t be any reason for you to feel miserable.

Take Care Of Your Body

While most holiday depression can be credited to emotions, the physical body also plays a big factor when this disorder comes up. With all the extra activities you’re doing during the holiday, you’ll certainly feel more exhausted than usual. If the body feels fatigued, the mind also easily becomes tired as well. When all that fatigue wells up, you can be sure that depression and anxiety will set in.

Make sure you take proper care of your own body during the holidays. Don’t stress yourself out and don’t put your physical health to the limit. Here are three tips you should remember.

  • Eat right. Gobbling down all that yummy Christmas dessert seems blissful, but it might only contribute to your exhaustion and depression later on. Watch your diet and stick to healthy and low-fat food. Avoid drinking too much alcohol and caffeine. Eat as much vegetables and fruits as you can, too.
  • Exercise. A bit of exercise will do your muscles some good, and it also revives your spirit. You should also go out under the sun, since its cheery rays can brighten up your mood.
  • Sleep. Depriving yourself of sleep and rest leads to stress and depletes your emotional reserves.

Keep Busy, Help The Community

If these tactics still don’t get rid of the loneliness you feel, you should switch to another method. Maybe your happiness lies in your ability to make other people happy. That makes sense, because Christmas is the time for sharing and giving. Maybe reaching out to other people in your community will do wonders for you too. Here are some ways to help other people, and cure your holiday depression too.

  • Be involved in charity work. What better way to spend your Christmas than helping out to the needy? Join volunteers and help serve less fortunate individuals. You can also donate your used clothes and toys, or money, to help them out. Every little bit helps.
  • Have an “open house”. Open up your home to other people, and let them come and go as they please. Give them a hearty meal to fill their stomachs. It might fill up your empty feeling too.
  • Reach out to those who feel the same way. There are sure to be other individuals out there who feel as sad and alone as you do. Be sympathetic and reach out to them. invite them for a chat, or dinner at your place. nobody should feel lonely and alone during Christmas.

Turn To Support Groups

When all of these methods fail, there’s another way that might help you shake off all the loneliness you feel: join a support group. These are people that meet with each other and discuss issues regarding their depression and what triggers them. Being in a support groups allows you to interact with others who feel just like you. You can discuss your worries openly and comfortably, without fearing that anyone will judge you. Joining a support group also helps you find the solution to your depression.

It’s easy to get the holiday blues, but you’ll soon realize that it’s easier to rid yourself of it. If you find yourself with this problem, turn to these simple tactics and you’ll soon have the happy holidays you want and deserve.

howtogetridofstuff.com

Plus 10 tips on how to cope with stress during these uncertain times:

Develop Support: You need a coach, mentor or some good people to bounce ideas off. In times of financial stress people are often embarrassed about the circumstances they have gotten into. They might isolate or hide because they are ashamed of what others might think of them and their judgment.

Think Calm: Applying the coolness of rational thought requires that you bring yourself to a calm state of mind. Think about your options and how you and your family might be able to adjust to your circumstances.

Do not Panic: You need to give yourself some time to fully assess your circumstances. Becoming hysterical and overwrought will cloud your thinking and judgment.

Be Positive: Even in the face of a possible financial problem a more optimistic (and realistic) attitude will help. Being hopeful or positive is not the same as being delusional. Having a good attitude brings clarity and often enhances the creative process, thereby enabling potential solutions to reveal themselves.

Get Clear: Take a full inventory of what is happening to you at this time. Find out where you stand financially. Get a real and current analysis of your financial circumstances. Do not take anything for granted!

Consider Your Goals: What exactly would you like to accomplish at this time? What steps can you take to accomplish these things? Consider what you can change and what you cannot. Are your expectations realistic or are you creating more stress for yourself by expecting too much at this time? (See Newsletter on goal setting).

Develop a New Spending Model: Immediately begin to cut back on spending by at least 20-25%. Create a new budget and stick to it. This strategy can help cut off a cash flow crisis.

Prevent Burnout: You may be angry, irritable and generally frustrated with your current situation. This frame of mind can produce bad judgment, conflict in your relationships and poor health. Take time to relax every day. Go to the gym. Listen to music. Take a short vacation. In other words do whatever you need to do to restore you to a better frame of mind. This is imperative to preventing burnout.

Get Creative: When a person is stressed out his/her ability to think creatively gets shut down. Creative thinking is exactly what people need the most when they are faced with problems that seem insurmountable. To think more creatively a person needs to get inspired. Take an art class, play some music, join a mastermind group, take yoga or meditate. Get out of your rut by changing your perspective.

Stay Healthy: In difficult times people will often rely on substances to get by. Increased drinking or eating is frequently used as an unhealthy coping strategy to soothe anxiety or lift a depressed mood. This is obviously a flawed strategy. People tend to feel worse when they overeat or drink to excess. If you want to flourish during difficult financial times you need to stay healthy. Do not rely on bad habits to get you through bad times…they never work!

Stanley Hyman, LCSW
Psychotherapist and Life Coach
avenuestressrelief.com

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