Depression Doesn’t Happen Just In the Winter. S.A.D.

Here’s What to Know About Summertime Sadness (S.A.D.)

June 5, 2018 – While classic winter S.A.D. is confusing, summer SAD is even trickier. By most estimates, between 5% and 10% of the U.S. population experiences S.A.D.,,Seasonal Affective Disorder.  But only a small portion of Americans, somewhere around 1% of the total population, have flare-ups in the summertime, says Dr. Norman Rosenthal, a SAD expert and a clinical professor of psychiatry at the Georgetown University School of Medicine.

Whenever it occurs, SAD can be a difficult condition to diagnose. It’s defined as major depression that follows a seasonal pattern for at least two years, according to the National Institutes for Mental Health. But since it’s a subtype of @depression, rather than a completely distinct condition, it can be hard to tell whether symptoms such as dips in mood and energy, sleep issues, feelings of hopelessness or worthlessness, changes in appetite and difficulty concentrating point to SAD or another type of depression. It can also be difficult to distinguish between true SAD and the less severe “winter blues.”

 

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Sydni’s Mental Health Journey

One weekend in June of 2017, our lives, the lives of our family, and most importantly, the life of our daughter Sydni, changed forever.

by Traci Quinn

We are shocked and heartbroken that our perfect daughter Sydni will have to battle this Mental Illness for the rest of her life.  Our families’ journey since then has been difficult, with the past six months being the worst. Sydni’s been hospitalized four times since her diagnosis. One of the things that can help our daughter in her recovery is her own “space”.

She was diagnosed with Bipolar/Schizoaffective Disorder at seventeen.  A brain disease that causes depression, mood swings, hearing voices, erratic behaviors and self harm/suicidal ideations.

 

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Treating Depression Often Lies In A Gray Zone – From Pills To Psychotherapy

Treating Depression Often Lies In A Gray Zone – From Pills To Psychotherapy

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By Nathaniel Morris,  November 25, 2017 –  Depression afflicts an estimated 16 million Americans every year, many of whom go to their doctors in despair, embarking on an often stressful process about what to do next. These visits may entail filling out forms with screening questions about symptoms such as mood changes and difficulty sleeping. Doctors may ask patients to share intimate details about such issues as marital conflicts and suicidal urges. Some patients may be referred to mental-health specialists for further examination.
Once diagnosed with depression, patients frequently face the question: “Are you interested in therapy, medications or both?”

 

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How To Encourage Someone To See A Therapist

How To Encourage Someone To See A Therapist

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By Mike Jones | Nov. 20, 2017   It’s hard to watch someone you care about struggle with their mental health. It’s even worse when you know they could benefit from professional help. Approaching an individual and encouraging them to seek therapy can be a tricky situation. If done the wrong way, you could aggravate the person or turn them against the idea entirely. However, there is an effective way to have this conversation.

 

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Kids Are Better Off With Pets

Antonio Balageur Soler/123RF
Source: Antonio Balageur Soler/123RF
Posted Jul 12, 2017

When I was a kid, a pet changed my life. It was not our family’s lovable mutt Frisky or even Murphy, my pet duck. No, it was a four foot yellow rat snake named Fred I got for three bucks when I was 13. He lived in a cage in my bedroom. I was transfixed by his enigmatic stare, alien beauty, and ability to swallow a mouse. I was hooked. Within a year, I had a menagerie of scaly creepy-crawlies. And while other kids were rocking out to the Beatles and Stones, I was learning the Latin names of snakes and devouring books on reptile behavior and ecology. In retrospect, Fred turned out to be metaphorical gateway drug that led me to pursue a Ph.D. in animal behavior and to eventually publish papers on topics like the love songs of alligators and the personalities of baby garter snakes.

 

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