You Really Can Be High-Functioning With A Severe Mental Illness

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We are all around you. We are the walking wounded, the invisibly battle-scarred. You see us every day — in the grocery store, at carpool, at school pickup and dropoff, at PTA meetings, at the gym and at work and at the playground. You probably don’t know that we have a severe mental illness.

We don’t plaster in on our foreheads, or go around announcing it. But it’s there. It’s always there. And even as we smile, even as we make small talk, even as we nod along with you; as we raise our kids and do our jobs and have our fun, it’s always there. Always looming. Always dominating everything.

 

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Depression Doesn’t Happen Just In the Winter. S.A.D.

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Here’s What to Know About Summertime Sadness (S.A.D.)

June 5, 2018 – While classic winter S.A.D. is confusing, summer SAD is even trickier. By most estimates, between 5% and 10% of the U.S. population experiences S.A.D.,,Seasonal Affective Disorder.  But only a small portion of Americans, somewhere around 1% of the total population, have flare-ups in the summertime, says Dr. Norman Rosenthal, a SAD expert and a clinical professor of psychiatry at the Georgetown University School of Medicine.

Whenever it occurs, SAD can be a difficult condition to diagnose. It’s defined as major depression that follows a seasonal pattern for at least two years, according to the National Institutes for Mental Health. But since it’s a subtype of @depression, rather than a completely distinct condition, it can be hard to tell whether symptoms such as dips in mood and energy, sleep issues, feelings of hopelessness or worthlessness, changes in appetite and difficulty concentrating point to SAD or another type of depression. It can also be difficult to distinguish between true SAD and the less severe “winter blues.”

 

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Sydni’s Mental Health Journey

One weekend in June of 2017, our lives, the lives of our family, and most importantly, the life of our daughter Sydni, changed forever.

by Traci Quinn

We are shocked and heartbroken that our perfect daughter Sydni will have to battle this Mental Illness for the rest of her life.  Our families’ journey since then has been difficult, with the past six months being the worst. Sydni’s been hospitalized four times since her diagnosis. One of the things that can help our daughter in her recovery is her own “space”.

She was diagnosed with Bipolar/Schizoaffective Disorder at seventeen.  A brain disease that causes depression, mood swings, hearing voices, erratic behaviors and self harm/suicidal ideations.

 

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Why Sleep Loss Is Linked To Depression As Well As Anxiety

New Clues About Why Sleep Loss Is Linked To Depression, Anxiety
sleepdrp
#Depression and #sleep problems are intimately connected, as many people know, and the relationship seems to go both ways. Sleep disturbances, of various types, are central symptoms of depression; on the other hand, chronic lack of sleep seems to predispose one to developing depression.

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The Way we Communicate with Young People is by Text, Saves Lives!

Amazingly, helping those in need by a crisis text line

Texting has become So important in helping the young! 
We now understand the importance of Texting!
We support it totally!
by Nancy Lublin
   How data from a crisis text line is saving lives    
TEXTING
When a young woman texted DoSomething.org with a heartbreaking cry for help, the organization responded by opening a nationwide Crisis Text Line for people in pain. Nearly 10 million text messages later, the organization is using the privacy and power of text messaging to help people handle addiction, suicidal thoughts, eating disorders, sexual abuse and more. But there’s an even bigger win: The anonymous data collected by text is teaching us when crises are most likely to happen — and helping schools and law enforcement to prepare for them.

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