Medications

Medications are not always indicated for the treatment of depression and depend, in part, on patient choice and severity of depression as well. If you and your provider decide that medication is needed to treat your depression it is important for you to do your part in achieving success.
 

  • Take your depression medication exactly as prescribed.
  • Do not stop any depression medication unless directed to do so by your provider. When some depression medications are discontinued, abruptly worsening depression, anxiety and flu-like symptoms can occur. These are not life-threatening but can be quite uncomfortable if they occur. This is more likely with medications that have a shorter half-life like Paxil and Effexor but can happen with others as well.

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Weighing the Risks: The Coming of Age on Antidepressants

 

Weighing the Risks:  The Coming Of Age On Antidepressants

 By RICHARD A. FRIEDMAN, M.D.

“I’ve grown up on medication,” my patient Julie told me recently. “I don’t have a sense of who I really am without it.”

At 31, she had been on one antidepressant or another nearly continuously since she was 14. There was little question that she had very serious depression and had survived several suicide attempts . In fact, she credited the medication with saving her life.

But now she was raising an equally fundamental question: how the drugs might have affected her psychological development and core identity.

It was not an issue I had seriously considered before. Most of my patients, who are adults, developed their psychiatric problems after they had a pretty clear idea of who they were as individuals. During treatment, most of them could tell me whether they were back to their normal baseline.

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Weighing the Risks: The Coming of Age on Antidepressants

 

Weighing the Risks:  The Coming Of Age On Antidepressants

 By RICHARD A. FRIEDMAN, M.D.

“I’ve grown up on medication,” my patient Julie told me recently. “I don’t have a sense of who I really am without it.”

At 31, she had been on one antidepressant or another nearly continuously since she was 14. There was little question that she had very serious depression and had survived several suicide attempts . In fact, she credited the medication with saving her life.

But now she was raising an equally fundamental question: how the drugs might have affected her psychological development and core identity.

It was not an issue I had seriously considered before. Most of my patients, who are adults, developed their psychiatric problems after they had a pretty clear idea of who they were as individuals. During treatment, most of them could tell me whether they were back to their normal baseline.

Continue reading “Weighing the Risks: The Coming of Age on Antidepressants”

Nighttime Fibromyagia Pain


Fibromyalgia Pain at Night

Do you toss and turn at night because of fibromyalgia pain or discomfort?

“People with fibromyalgia tend to have very disturbed sleep,” says Doris Cope, MD, director of Pain Management at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. “Even if they sleep 10 hours a night, they still feel fatigued, don’t feel rested.”

Research shows that with fibromyalgia, there is an automatic arousal in the brain during sleep. Frequent disruptions prevent the important restorative processes from occurring. Growth hormone is mostly produced during sleep. Without restorative sleep and the surge of growth hormone, muscles don’t heal and neurotransmitters (like the mood chemical serotonin) are not replenished. The lack of a good night’s sleep makes people with fibromyalgia wake up feeling tired and fatigued.

The result: The body can’t recuperate from the day’s stresses — all of which overwhelms the system, creating a great sensitivity to pain. Widespread pain, sleep problems, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and memory difficulties are all symptoms of fibromyalgia.

Insomnia takes many forms — trouble falling asleep, waking up often during the night, having trouble going back to sleep, and waking up too early in the morning. Smoothing out those sleep problems — and helping people get the deep sleep their bodies need — helps fibromyalgia pain improve significantly, research shows.

Medications can help enhance sleep and relieve pain. But doctors also advocate lifestyle changes to help sleep come naturally.

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Is Psychological Disorders caused by Anxiety Sensitvity?

ScienceDaily (Nov. 11, 2006) — People who get scared when they experience a pounding heart, sweaty palms or dizziness — even if the cause is something as mundane as stress, exercise or caffeine — are more likely to develop a clinical case of anxiety or panic disorder, according to a Florida State University researcher in Tallahassee, Fla.

While other researchers have proposed a connection between this so-called “anxiety sensitivity” and a range of anxiety problems, the study by FSU psychology professors N. Brad Schmidt and Jon Maner and University of Vermont Professor Michael Zvolensky provides the first evidence that anxiety sensitivity is a risk factor in the development of anxiety disorders. The study will be published in the December issue of the Journal of Psychiatric Research.

Continue reading “Is Psychological Disorders caused by Anxiety Sensitvity?”

Is Psychological Disorders caused by Anxiety Sensitvity?

ScienceDaily (Nov. 11, 2006) — People who get scared when they experience a pounding heart, sweaty palms or dizziness — even if the cause is something as mundane as stress, exercise or caffeine — are more likely to develop a clinical case of anxiety or panic disorder, according to a Florida State University researcher in Tallahassee, Fla.

While other researchers have proposed a connection between this so-called “anxiety sensitivity” and a range of anxiety problems, the study by FSU psychology professors N. Brad Schmidt and Jon Maner and University of Vermont Professor Michael Zvolensky provides the first evidence that anxiety sensitivity is a risk factor in the development of anxiety disorders. The study will be published in the December issue of the Journal of Psychiatric Research.

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Depression And Chronic pain Are Common And Often Overlapping Disorders

ScienceDaily (Nov. 5, 2008) — The brains of individuals with major depressive disorder appear to react more strongly when anticipating pain and also display altered functioning of the neural network that modifies pain sensitivity, according to a new report.

 

“Chronic pain and depression are common and often overlapping syndromes,” the authors write as background information in the article. Recurring or chronic pain occurs in more than 75 percent of patients with depression, and between 30 percent and 60 percent of patients with chronic pain report symptoms of depression “Understanding the neurobiological basis of this relationship is important because the presence of comorbid pain contributes significantly to poorer outcomes and increased cost of treatment in major depressive disorder.”

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Depression And Chronic pain Are Common And Often Overlapping Disorders

ScienceDaily (Nov. 5, 2008) — The brains of individuals with major depressive disorder appear to react more strongly when anticipating pain and also display altered functioning of the neural network that modifies pain sensitivity, according to a new report.

 

“Chronic pain and depression are common and often overlapping syndromes,” the authors write as background information in the article. Recurring or chronic pain occurs in more than 75 percent of patients with depression, and between 30 percent and 60 percent of patients with chronic pain report symptoms of depression “Understanding the neurobiological basis of this relationship is important because the presence of comorbid pain contributes significantly to poorer outcomes and increased cost of treatment in major depressive disorder.”

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BETWEEN PARENT & CHILD

By LAWRENCE KUTNER

WHEN I was 4 years old, my parents, who were atheists, thought I should have a choice of celebrating either Christmas or Hanukkah. When I found out that you receive presents on only one day for Christmas, but if you celebrate Hanukkah you get them for several days, my choice was clear.

“There’s no way children that age can make a decision about religion,” said Dr. Bennett L. Leventhal, the director of child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of Chicago. “They simply don’t have the cognitive skills to handle anything that complex or abstract. Even with teen-agers, their decisions may be more of a response to peer pressure than to theology.”

For many families, this is a season of religious celebration. The holidays also call attention to religious differences within families and between friends. This is especially true for families where the parents are of different faiths, and in stepfamilies where the children have different religious beliefs and training.

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Baby Steps to Surviving the Winter Holidays

 

 

What is it with the holidays? We’re supposed to be happy, merry, and all too often, we’re depressed, anxious, and stressed. The pre-enlightened Scrooge had the right idea, we think. Bah, humbug, we say! But if Scrooge can turn it around, why can’t we? After all, are any of us as hard a nut to crack as he?

The following are 10 suggestions on how to survive the period between Thanksgiving and New Year’s. Or how to turn around the holidays – without any ghostly visitations.

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