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Published By  Lindsay

More Depression In Children Tied To Abuse

 

01-10-2010--Although children can be depressed for many reasons, new evidence suggests that there are physiological differences among depressed children based on their experiences of abuse before age 5. Early abuse may be especially damaging due to the very young age at which it occurs.

Those are the findings of a new study of low-income children that was conducted by researchers at the University of Minnesota and the University of Rochester, Mt. Hope Family Center. The study appears in the January/February 2010 issue of the journal Child Development. 

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Published By  Forum Admin

Mental Health Screening

 

 

 Mental illness is a significant problem for today's adolescents, with major depressive disorder being a particularly disabling condition that is associated with serious long-term morbidity and risk for suicide.[1] The Institute of Medicine (IOM),[2] the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF),[3] and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend a mental health assessment for adolescents as part of routine medical care.[4]

Through regular mental health checkups, teens at risk for suicide and serious disability from mental illness can be identified and offered effective treatment options that can eliminate or curtail lifetime disability.[2,5] Mental health checkups ensure that symptoms of illness are detected early when treatment is most effective.[2,6]

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Published By  Lindsay

 Thanksgiving Can Be  Low-Stress 

If You Follow These Steps

 
 
 

      Talk to your relatives to determine who will be hosting Thanksgiving dinner and any other activities that may revolve around this day. Offer up your house only under a couple of circumstances: if you host it every year, if it's your turn to host a major holiday, if hosting it somewhere else will put a tremendous amount of stress on an elderly or ill member of the family or if you really want to host it.

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Published By  Lindsay

Is It Necessary For Families Dining together To Be Mandatory?


Public Policy Which Will Promote Family Mealtimes,  Prevent Future Problems
 


A provocative paper by a University of Illinois professor calls for government entities, local businesses, and community leaders to support a public policy that promotes family mealtimes.

“There are few things parents can do that are as effective in protecting their families as taking 18 to 20 minutes to eat together and talk with each other three to five times a week,” said Barbara H. Fiese, a U of I professor of human development and family studies and the director of the U of I’s Family Resiliency Center.

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Published By  Forum Admin
 


 There is often a social stigma associated with clinical depression, that a person who suffers from depression has a certain negative personality or is a loner, etc. But this stigma is quite far from the biological truth. By understanding the biological mechanism of depression and the role of serotonin and the medications used to treat it, SSRIs, (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) can help to dismantle this notion.

You see, there are brain chemicals called neurotransmitters associated with depression, including the neurotransmitter serotonin and some research suggests that abnormalities in neurotransmitter activity affect mood and behavior as in depression. What SSRIs do is relieve symptoms of depression by blocking the reabsorption (reuptake) of serotonin by certain nerve cells in the brain, leaving more serotonin around in the brain. This enhances neurotransmission, the sending of nerve impulses and improves mood. SSRIs are called selective because they seem to affect only serotonin, not other neurotransmitters.

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Published By  Forum Admin

Antidepressants May Be Beneficial To Older

Adults Who are

Suffering From Anxiety





 Jan. 20, 2009 - Anxious older adults may benefit from antidepressants.  Many older adults worry — a lot. Almost one in 10 Americans over age 60 suffer from an anxiety disorder that causes them to worry excessively about normal things — like health, finances, disability and family. Although antidepressant drugs known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can improve anxiety symptoms in younger adults, little has been known about their effects in older people.

In the largest study of SSRIs in older people with anxiety disorders, a team of psychiatric researchers found the drug escitalopram (Lexapro®) improved anxiety symptoms and quality of life. Results are reported in the Jan. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.


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