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If you - or someone you know - are having thoughts about suicide, call 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Calls are connected to a certified crisis center nearest the caller's location. Services are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.                                                                            If you - or someone you know - are having thoughts about suicide, call 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Calls are connected to a certified crisis center nearest the caller's location. Services are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
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Published By  Lindsay

Changing how a person perceives and thinks about others was the most effective intervention for loneliness, a sweeping analysis of previous research has determined. The findings may help physicians and psychologists develop better treatments for loneliness, a known risk factor for heart disease and other health problems. Recently, researchers have characterized the negative influence of loneliness upon blood pressure, sleep quality, dementia, and other health measures. Those effects suggest that loneliness is a health risk factor, similar to obesity or smoking, which can be targeted to improve patients' health in several dimensions.

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Published By  Forum Admin

Recognizably the Same Person, Study Suggests


Personality traits observed in childhood are a strong predictor of adult behavior, a study by researchers at the University of California, Riverside, the Oregon Research Institute and University of Oregon suggests.

The study will appear in a forthcoming issue of the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science, a quarterly publication of the Association for Research in Personality, the European Association of Social Psychology, the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, and co-sponsored by the Asian Association of Social Psychology and the Society of Australasian Social Psychologists.



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Published By  Lindsay



 
  • Agoraphobia and Panic attacks are periods of intense fear or discomfort that arise suddenly and unexpectedly and in the absence of any apparent external danger or threat. They may seem thus to happen for no reason but they are actually fear of fear. The panic is a reaction to a physical sensation in the body, connected to being afraid, to which the person has become sensitized.

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Published By  Lindsay

Shedding Light On How Psychiatric Risk Gene Disrupts Brain Development

16 Jul 2010   Scientists are making progress towards a better understanding of the neuropathology associated with debilitating psychiatric illnesses like bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. New research, published by Cell Press in the July 15 issue of the journal Neuron, reveals mechanisms that connect a known psychiatric risk gene to disruptions in brain cell proliferation and migration during development.

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Published By  Forum Admin

By Michael Peltier

Tue, Jun 29 2010 PENSACOLA BEACH, FLA (Reuters) - The mental health impacts of the BP oil spill will dwarf those encountered after the last major oil spill off U.S. shores, a sociologist who studied the Exxon Valdez spill told Florida volunteers on Tuesday.

University of South Alabama researcher Steve Picou said the effects of the spill will far overshadow the negative effects experienced by 30,000 Alaska residents after the Exxon tanker dumped millions of gallons (liters) of crude into Prince William Sound in 1989.

Twenty years after that disaster, a "significant minority" of those residents continue to suffer the mental health consequences and Picou said the BP spill will affect far more people in communities along the Gulf of Mexico.

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Published By  Lindsay

 Modest cognitive benefit with antipsychotics in schizophrenia

July 2010 Browse Archive: Go

MedWire News: Schizophrenia patients treated with antipsychotics over a 2-year period show modest improvement in cognitive test performance, study results show.

However, contrary to prevailing opinion, there was no difference between conventional and atypical psychotics in cognitive improvement, and the researchers say that a decision to switch to the latter medication should not be taken solely based on cognition.

"Atypical antipsychotics provide better control of the negative and affective symptoms of schizophrenia when compared with conventional neuroleptics; nevertheless, their heightened ability to improve cognitive dysfunction remains a matter of debate," write Gabriel Selva-Vera (University of Valencia, Spain) and colleagues in the journal BMC Psychiatry.

In the current study, the researchers recruited a sample of schizophrenia patients taking either conventional (n=13) or atypical antipsychotics (n=26). They performed a battery of neuropsychological at baseline and at 2 years of follow-up.

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