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If you - or someone you know - are having thoughts about suicide, call 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Calls are connected to a certified crisis center nearest the caller's location. Services are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.                                                                            If you - or someone you know - are having thoughts about suicide, call 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Calls are connected to a certified crisis center nearest the caller's location. Services are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
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Published By  Lindsay

Despite 'black box warning' for drugs such as Prozac, no increase -- or decrease -- was found

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Antidepressant drugs such as Prozac do not raise suicide risk in young people, a new study says.

The finding should help reassure doctors about prescribing antidepressants to youngsters, said first author Robert Gibbons, a professor of medicine, health studies and psychiatry at the University of Chicago.

Read more...

Published By  Lindsay

Medication Helps Some With Mild Depression



  People with mild depression may benefit from antidepressants, suggests a new meta-analysis.

Some earlier reports had suggested that antidepressants generally only improve mood in people with severe depression. But that might be because those studies weren't precise enough to pick up on smaller changes in symptoms that can still make a difference for people with milder forms of the disease, researchers on the new study said.

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Published By  Lindsay

Deaths From Abuse of Painkillers Triple in a Decade: CDC


Almost two-thirds of overdose deaths are from opioid pain relievers, agency says

The number of deaths from prescription drug overdoses has tripled in a decade, hitting a peak of 36,000 fatalities in 2008, U.S. health officials reported Tuesday.

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Published By  Lindsay

FDA Approves Tapentadol for Chronic Pain

 
 The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved tapentadol extended release (Nucynta, Janssen Pharmaceuticals) for moderate to severe chronic pain.

The drug, already approved for acute pain, has now been given the okay for long-term use, the company announced today. In Europe, tapentadol is marketed as Palexia.

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Published By  Lindsay

The Current Crisis of Confidence in Antidepressants


Two recent events in the field of psychiatry have captured the attention of the lay media: (1) the results of research examining the efficacy of antidepressants for patients with mild-to-moderate depression and (2) the FDA requirement that antidepressants carry a black box warning regarding suicidal thinking and behavior in patients younger than 25 years. The media’s interpretations of these events have affected public perception of the safety and utility of antidepressants and raised challenging questions for clinicians who treat patients with these medications.

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Published By  Lindsay

Do antidepressants work? Doctors and patients respond to a letter on Wednesday that questioned their liberal use.

 



THE LETTER

To the Editor:

In Defense of Antidepressants,” by Peter D. Kramer (Sunday Review, July 10), reflects a high-stakes battle involving pharmaceutical companies, health care providers and patients.

Read more...

Subcategories

  • Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs)
    These medications are rarely used anylonger because of strict dietary requirements and life-threatening drug and food interactions.
  • Atypical Antidepressants
    Atypical antidepressants may be prescribed when SSRIs or TCAs have not worked.
  • Medications for Bipolar Disorder
    Medications for bipolar disorder are prescribed by psychiatrists - medical doctors (M.D.) with expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders. While primary care physicians who do not specialize in psychiatry also may prescribe these medications, it is recommended that people with bipolar disorder see a psychiatrist for treatment.
  • Antipsychotic Drugs
    Antipsychotic medications have been available since the mid-1950s. They have greatly improved the outlook for individual patients. These medications reduce the psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia and usually allow the patient to function more effectively and appropriately.
  • Benzodiazepines (Systemic)
    Benzodiazepines (ben-zoe-dye-AZ-e-peens) belong to the group of medicines called central nervous system (CNS) depressants (medicines that slow down the nervous system).
  • Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)
    There are many terms used to describe approaches to health care that are outside the realm of conventional medicine as practiced in the United States. This fact sheet explains how the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), a component of the National Institutes of Health, defines some of the key terms used in the field of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Terms that are underlined in the text are defined at the end of this fact sheet.
  • The Partnership for Prescription Assistance
    The Partnership for Prescription Assistance brings together America™s pharmaceutical companies, doctors, patient advocacy organizations and civic groups to help low-income, uninsured patients get free or nearly free brand-name medicines. Its mission is to increase awareness of and enrollment in existing patient assistance programs for those who may be eligible. Through this site, the Partnership for Prescription Assistance offers a single point of access to more than 275 public and private patient assistance programs, including more than 150 programs offered by pharmaceutical companies.
  • Depression Anxiety Medication
    This article is intended to inform you, but it is not a “do-ityourself” manual. Leave it to the doctor, working closely with you, to diagnose mental illness, interpret signs and symptoms of the illness, prescribe and manage medication, and explain any side effects. This will help you ensure that you use medication most effectively and with minimum risk of side effects or complications. - Depressionforums.org
  • DF Medicine Chest
    The treatment of mental disorders is a personal trial and error process. Your wonder drug or combination of, will be discovered totally independent of what may or may not work for another individual.
    Let us examine each individual antidepressant and antipsychotic, etc and see what they are all about.
  • Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI's)
    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications affect the levels of serotonin in the brain. For many people, these medications are the first choice to treat depression.
  • Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCAs)
    Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are often prescribed in severe cases of depression or when SSRI medications do not work.
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