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Please Help, I Really Want To Get Off Meds


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4 replies to this topic

#1 mrawesome

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 03:49 AM

hello,

i was diagnosed for bipolar after a very ridiculous situation where I had taken lots of hard drugs and was barely eating, i was barely sleeping, and I was going though a really emotional time. I was also admitted to the hospital under false pretenses and refused the right to see a doctor. i'm taking bipolar meds and they have been making me have erectile dysfunction, extreme lethargy, wild mood swings, and insomnia. I want to stop taking the meds. im stable and i feel like i'd rather try living naturally and not be so harmed by the meds. i'd appreciate any tips or support from any one who has been through a similar situation.

Thanks

#2 Le Renard

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 11:27 AM

Hello,

When you get a little cold, you can choose either to take some meds or to drink something warm waiting to get better. But for people who have a bipolar disorder, there is not such a choice. We must take meds all our life in order to have a more or less normal life. In this disease, meds are not a luxury, they are a necessity.

Now if you think you were wrongly diagnosed with bipolar disorder, you should talk about that with a psychiatrist. Maybe you could take stock of your situation and check your current state. It can take several months or even years to be sure someone has the disease or not. Leaving the meds for a certain time can be a good occasion to watch your "normal" behaviour and decide if your previous problems were due to a bipolar disorder or the use of drugs.

If it appears that you have a bipolar disorder, you and your doctor will be able to discuss and choose the meds which will suit you the best, that is to say, which will let you have a "normal" life with the least side effects.

Anyway if you decide to leave your meds, never do it alone. It's not a little decision and the repercussions can be serious. Talk to your doctor.

Take care of you, MrAwesome. :smile:

Best regards.

Edited by Le Renard, 26 November 2012 - 11:31 AM.


#3 lovelyowl

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 10:49 PM

I can understand why you feel you may have been misdiagnosed. If you are serious about this, please do it under the supervision of a doctor. Even if the doctor disagrees with you, s/he'll most likely agree to supervise a taper if you insist. If it turns out the dx was right, you want the protection of a dr. Even just coming off the meds is better with a dr's support to deal with any discontinuation.

Many bipolar people, once stabilized, feel they do not really have bipolar and stop taking their meds, only to become depressed or manic and experience a worsening of their illness. I am not saying this is you, but I think it happens often enough that any person with a bipolar dx would be wise to talk about it with someone they trust to be objective.

#4 lovelyowl

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 10:54 PM

I should add, if you decide to stay on meds, you should ask your doctor if you need a med change. Those are very serious side effects.

Can't give you any tips of my own. I went off meds and went into a 2 year mixed state that was very hard to stabilize. This horrendous experience has coloured my thoughts on the issue.

#5 UMustang

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 10:36 AM

mrawesome,

As others have suggested, if you think that there is an issue with your diagnosis, I would suggest discussing this with either your GP and/or a psychiatrist. It's better to have a diagnosis that takes into account what you mentioned, but also one that you can rest your hat on and begin to treat effectively.

From my experience with my wife, I can understand the reluctance to take medication, especially if you feel that you are stable. The unfortunate part is that the medication is aiding in this stability, so discontinuing your meds will just make matters worse. My wife was on her medication for a year, thought she was stable, had a psychiatrist think she was stable, and tapered off her meds. Right now she's in hospital because she had a psychotic episode. She's been in there for three weeks today, no medication, and not getting any better.

That being said, medication isn't the ONLY part of managing illnesses like this. It's a combination of eating right, exercise, sleeping well, etc. I know people who swear by vitamins and supplements IN ADDITION to their medication.

My suggestion is talk to your doctor and discuss your medication AND its side effects. Insomnia and mood swings don't sound good, so maybe she/he can help with that.

Best of luck

Diagnosis - Clinical Depression, 28 years and counting

Medication - 60mg Celexa daily

Problem Drinker, been dry since March 1, 2013

Currently - In a good place





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