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Feels Like Whole Body Restless Leg Syndrome


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#1 beachgirl

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 08:28 AM

I've had it since I've been on Lexapro. I read somewhere what it's called but can't find it. Anyone know?

Also, I read that it may be an allergy to the drug, but I don't know?

Sometimes I feel so restless that I have to jump on my trampoline. It's crazy.

#2 Epictetus

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 09:40 AM

Hi beachgirl,

I'm sorry to hear that you are experiencing unwelcome side effects on Lexapro. Please bring these up with your prescribing physican. On Lexapro I experienced many little body spasms that I called "zaps." Is this what you are refering to or is it something else. The anti-depressants are powerful medicines so there are usually side effects.

It is important to realize that clinical depression involves serious disease pathology in the brain. One part of the brain in particular, called the hippcampus can atrophy [shrink] and lose as much as 20% of its total volume in serious long-standing depressions. A 20% volumetric loss in any part of the brain is serious. Depression has also been linked to abnormal blood flow and abnormal glucose metabolism in areas of the brain. So it is a disease that can be as serious as epilepsy or cancer.

Sadly, clinical depression does not merely harm the brain. It can cause harm to the entire body. Clinical unipolar depression has been linked to abnormalities in hormone regulation, poor cardiac health, reduced immune responses to infection, adult-onset diaetes, rapid tumor growth in cancer patient, osteoporosis and many other health problems. It is a whole body illness.

I am glad you are in the care of a physican because I wouldn't want anything bad to happen to you. Please work closely with your doctor and keep him apprised of the various side effects you are experiencing. I wish you a return to good health Beachgirl!!!

Edited by Ep1ctetus, 27 August 2012 - 09:42 AM.

 Your brain is your best friend.  It works 24 hours a day to keep you alive, healthy and happy.  As such it deserves love, respect, compassion, encouragement, understanding and consolation.  It is not an all-powerful all-perfect being.  It makes mistakes.  It can become ill.  But it always tries to make your health its #1 priority.  Where could one find a friend like that?  Even when you are sleeping it is trying to help you.    So it deserve love in good times and bad, it its successes and its failures, in sickness and in health.  It doesn't deserve to be mentally beat up with insults like:  weak, lazy, stupid,  loser, no good.  It does tens of thousands of strong, brave, clever, wise, good and beautiful things each day for you.

 

  If depression is related to hatred of the brain [even unconscious or organically caused], then it seems like learning to love the brain is one of the ways out of depression.  If putting a sense of life-or-death urgency on the brain in non-life-or-death situations stresses the brain out and leads to anxiety, then it seems like learning to be less demanding, more realistic and more compassion to the brain is one of the ways out of paralyzing anxiety.  


#3 Spiritual_Wanderer

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 04:20 PM

Are you talking about akathisia?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akathisia
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Many Blessings,
SW
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#4 memyselfi10

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 06:00 PM

I experienced the same thing while taking Lexipro.
"I'm not crazy, I'm just a little unwell; I know right now you can't tell..."

("Unwell," Matchbox 20)



#5 beachgirl

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 05:24 AM

Hi Ep1ctetus,

No it's not brain zaps.

Thank you for your detailed description of depression. I had to study alot of psychology in college, so I know (through education and experience) the damage it does. Too bad they don't teach us how to cure it/ourselves!

#6 beachgirl

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 05:25 AM

Spirit,

I guess it must be, although I thought that was limited to restless leg syndrome. I guess it can be a whole body thing too.

#7 beachgirl

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 05:26 AM

Memyself,

Is that why you got off of it? It doesn't always happen...but when it does it sucks.




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