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      National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2016   05/01/2016

      Proclamation 9433 of April 28, 2016 National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2016 A Proclamation Nearly 44 million American adults, and millions of children, experience mental health conditions each year, including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and post-traumatic stress. Although we have made progress expanding mental health coverage and elevating the conversation about mental health, too many people still do not get the help they need. Our Nation is founded on the belief that we must look out for one another—and whether it affects our family members, friends, co-workers, or those unknown to us—we do a service for each other when we reach out and help those struggling with mental health issues. This month, we renew our commitment to ridding our society of the stigma associated with mental illness, encourage those living with mental health conditions to get the help they need, and reaffirm our pledge to ensure those who need help have access to the support, acceptance, and resources they deserve. In the last 7 years, our country has made extraordinary progress in expanding mental health coverage for more people across America. The Affordable Care Act prohibits insurance companies from discriminating against people based on pre-existing conditions, requires coverage of mental health and substance use disorder services in individual and small group markets, and expands mental health and substance use disorder parity policies, which are estimated to help more than 60 million Americans. Nearly 15 million more Americans have gained Medicaid coverage since October 2013, significantly improving access to mental health care. And because of more than $100 million in funding from the Affordable Care Act, community health centers have expanded behavioral health services for nearly 900,000 people nationwide over the past 2 years. Still, far too few Americans experiencing mental illnesses do not receive the care and treatment they need. That is why my most recent Budget proposal includes a new half-billion dollar investment to improve access to mental health care, engage individuals with serious mental illness in care, and help ensure behavioral health care systems work for everyone. Our Nation has made strong advances in improving prevention, increasing early intervention, and expanding treatment of mental illnesses. Earlier this year, I established a Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Parity Task Force, which aims to ensure that coverage for mental health benefits is comparable to coverage for medical and surgical care, improve understanding of the requirements of the law, and expand compliance with it. Mental health should be treated as part of a person's overall health, and we must ensure individuals living with mental health conditions can get the treatment they need. My Administration also continues to invest in science and research through the BRAIN initiative to enhance our understanding of the complexities of the human brain and to make it easier to diagnose and treat mental health disorders early. One of our most profound obligations as a Nation is to support the men and women in uniform who return home and continue fighting battles against mental illness. Last year, I signed the Clay Hunt SAV Act, which fills critical gaps in serving veterans with post-traumatic stress and other illnesses, increases peer support and outreach, and recruits more talented individuals to work on mental health issues at the Department of Veterans Affairs. This law will make it easier for veterans to get the care they need when they need it. All Americans, including service members, can get immediate assistance by calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK or by calling 1-800-662-HELP. During National Mental Health Awareness Month, we recognize those Americans who live with mental illness and substance use disorders, and we pledge solidarity with their families who need our support as well. Let us strive to ensure people living with mental health conditions know that they are not alone, that hope exists, and that the possibility of healing and thriving is real. Together, we can help everyone get the support they need to recover as they continue along the journey to get well. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 2016 as National Mental Health Awareness Month. I call upon citizens, government agencies, organizations, health care providers, and research institutions to raise mental health awareness and continue helping Americans live longer, healthier lives. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-eighth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand sixteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fortieth.  
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mtclmbr_gal

Calm On The Outside, Screaming On The Inside

14 posts in this topic

Posted

Hey Everyone,

I've really been struggling this week. I haven't showered since last Tuesday (embarrassed to admit that). I haven't been able to eat very much either. I'm very anxious (bad kind) to go back to work tomorrow after a week off. I love my job, but I hate the madness & the poor management. I tried resigning last week, but my bosses are putting so much pressure on me to stay by laying on the guilt trips. They keep telling me that if I don't work full-time (job I was hired to do was part-time), that there won't be enough teachers to watch the children & that is against the law. I'm a para for those with special needs, but somehow I got stuck as the lead teacher who has been working 40-60 hrs/week & finally had a meltdown at work.

With my friend nearly dying recently, my mom-like figure battling cancer with no treatment options left, losing 2 of my friends almost a couple of years ago one to cancer & another to a drunk driver; I haven't had much time to grieve. I also recently graduated from college & moved to a new town, so the transition hasn't been easy either. It's all just piling up on me & has recently began taking its toll on me. Being yelled at at my job and mocked was pretty much my last straw. I've put my heart & soul into my job, and I can't watch 12 children at once while also providing therapy to a child who I was hired to attend to. I'm talking to my other boss tomorrow to either quit, take a leave, or set some strict boundaries. I'm just very depressed at the moment. Doing laundry, eating, or even picking up a single thing is far too overwhelming for me. My friend also said she was going to call me to take me out to lunch today, but that didn't happen. While I'm trying not to be angry (b/c something may have come up for her), I'm just so tangled up in a web of frustration right now & trying to deal with this on my own.

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Posted

Hi mt_clmber girl,

I'm terribly sorry for all of your losses, and you are right that you really need to take time off for yourself in order to grieve and recover from what sounds like a terrible job situation. Working in education myself, I do understand the incredible strain this job entails, and when we care, we push ourselves to the limits. It amounts to job burn out, and people just don't undersand what it takes to teach and care for all the needs children have all day long. Our numbers are increasing, and our funding is decreasing, but we can't complain, or we get a guilt trip. Honestly, I wouldn't let the guilt deter you. You are no good to the child you are caring for or the other children if you aren't strong yourself.

Ask for time off or a short leave, and if you don't get it, consider another job.

Sincerely,

MaddieLouise

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Posted

mtclmbrgal,

I can relate to your topic title really well. I know what it's like to suffer many losses in a short period of time, seems like story of my life. Anyhow, I'm all out of ideas at the moment, but wanted to let you know I relate and that you do need to take care of yourself and I hope that you work something out with your job that allows it.

Best wishes.

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Posted

Hi Mt Climber Girl,

You should explain to your boss that you are being over worked and this is affecting your ability to do your job. If they try to guilt trip you then tell them the guilt is on their head not yours, and its up to them to recruit enough staff to do the job. You're being overworked but still trying to do the best job you can. And I agree with Maddie you should get some time off for berievement.

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Posted

Thank you all for your support. It helps a great deal to have someone just respond to my frustrations or to relate to what I'm going through. I have talked to my boss about being overworked, and she just laughed at me. I then said I would like to resign. They pretty much pleaded for me to come back, so now I'm going to have a talk with my primary boss tomorrow - the one that didn't laugh at me (I have 2 bosses). We'll see what happens tomorrow. :shocked:

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Posted

Hi mtclmbr_gal,

Just read your post(s) and you have been through a lot. :console:

I think if it's a choice between your mental health and your job, choose your mental health. But I hope they can come up with some kind of compromise for you.

Best wishes. Let us know how it goes.

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Posted

Thank you all for your support. It helps a great deal to have someone just respond to my frustrations or to relate to what I'm going through. I have talked to my boss about being overworked, and she just laughed at me. I then said I would like to resign. They pretty much pleaded for me to come back, so now I'm going to have a talk with my primary boss tomorrow - the one that didn't laugh at me (I have 2 bosses). We'll see what happens tomorrow. :shocked:

Very professional response - them laughing. I'm glad you took the "then I resign" approach, because they weren't taking you seriously, and you need this! Good job!

MaddieLouise

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Posted

Good news! They let me cut my hours in half! Thankfully I can afford to do that for a little while & enjoy a 4-day weekend! I'm so much happier! I've also been able to get out of bed and shower! Whoo whoo!

Trace and addict1968 like this

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Posted

Congratulations! Great way to go for what you wanted. Maybe this will give you some much needed time away.

Sincerely,

MaddieLouise

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Posted

I am happy for you mtclmbr gal. Wish you all the best.

Take care,

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Posted

That is excellent news mtclmbr_gal!

Trace

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Posted

Now I'm just having troubles figuring out what to do on my days off. While I know I need to rest, it's hard for me to just sit around. I would like to begin trying yoga tonight to see if it's something I would enjoy doing, but my energy level to leave my apartment is low, and I'm afraid of what other people may think of my body shape (my non-anxiety part of my brain is saying, "Who cares?").

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Posted

That's grea news that you were able to cut your hours. I work three days a week now and I am so much happier for it. I swim on my days off.

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Posted

Hey Mtclmbr Gal,

I replied to your other post too, but I wanted to chime in here as well!

When things were going well for me, I was slender and fit. I taught Yoga (got the national certification), and water aerobics as well as working as a Librarian 40 hrs a week! I was on top of the world.

Now, I'm well over 200 lbs, in a lot of physical pain from previous injuries and Rheumatoid Arthritis, and just depressed as hell. My anxiety has been extreme lately too. So, I can certainly relate to what you are feeling!

My energy level is so low I have a hard time walking from my car to the library. And I park in a handicapped spot up near the building! I know it's good for me to get up and walk around, and I enjoy doing it when I am working with students but god am I tired afterwards!

I gave up long ago caring what other people think of me. I am a careful dresser and very into being color coordinated, but I do it for my own enjoyment and not for anyone else! The only person who's opinion I care about is my boyfriend. He started dating me when I was slim and has stuck with me through this 4 years of weight gain, depression and anxiety. He has been a rock for me, but I feel so badly for him. He didn't sign up for this! So, for his sake and for my own health I'm trying to lose weight. That's really hard for someone with binge eating problems!

I don't know how or why I got off on this tangent! I guess I'm trying to say I really relate to what you are saying. One thing I wanted to ask is how you are eating? That can have a great effect on your energy levels. I know about that because I really eat terribly now, and I used to be very good about "fueling" my body.

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