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      National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2016   05/01/2016

      Proclamation 9433 of April 28, 2016 National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2016 A Proclamation Nearly 44 million American adults, and millions of children, experience mental health conditions each year, including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and post-traumatic stress. Although we have made progress expanding mental health coverage and elevating the conversation about mental health, too many people still do not get the help they need. Our Nation is founded on the belief that we must look out for one another—and whether it affects our family members, friends, co-workers, or those unknown to us—we do a service for each other when we reach out and help those struggling with mental health issues. This month, we renew our commitment to ridding our society of the stigma associated with mental illness, encourage those living with mental health conditions to get the help they need, and reaffirm our pledge to ensure those who need help have access to the support, acceptance, and resources they deserve. In the last 7 years, our country has made extraordinary progress in expanding mental health coverage for more people across America. The Affordable Care Act prohibits insurance companies from discriminating against people based on pre-existing conditions, requires coverage of mental health and substance use disorder services in individual and small group markets, and expands mental health and substance use disorder parity policies, which are estimated to help more than 60 million Americans. Nearly 15 million more Americans have gained Medicaid coverage since October 2013, significantly improving access to mental health care. And because of more than $100 million in funding from the Affordable Care Act, community health centers have expanded behavioral health services for nearly 900,000 people nationwide over the past 2 years. Still, far too few Americans experiencing mental illnesses do not receive the care and treatment they need. That is why my most recent Budget proposal includes a new half-billion dollar investment to improve access to mental health care, engage individuals with serious mental illness in care, and help ensure behavioral health care systems work for everyone. Our Nation has made strong advances in improving prevention, increasing early intervention, and expanding treatment of mental illnesses. Earlier this year, I established a Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Parity Task Force, which aims to ensure that coverage for mental health benefits is comparable to coverage for medical and surgical care, improve understanding of the requirements of the law, and expand compliance with it. Mental health should be treated as part of a person's overall health, and we must ensure individuals living with mental health conditions can get the treatment they need. My Administration also continues to invest in science and research through the BRAIN initiative to enhance our understanding of the complexities of the human brain and to make it easier to diagnose and treat mental health disorders early. One of our most profound obligations as a Nation is to support the men and women in uniform who return home and continue fighting battles against mental illness. Last year, I signed the Clay Hunt SAV Act, which fills critical gaps in serving veterans with post-traumatic stress and other illnesses, increases peer support and outreach, and recruits more talented individuals to work on mental health issues at the Department of Veterans Affairs. This law will make it easier for veterans to get the care they need when they need it. All Americans, including service members, can get immediate assistance by calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK or by calling 1-800-662-HELP. During National Mental Health Awareness Month, we recognize those Americans who live with mental illness and substance use disorders, and we pledge solidarity with their families who need our support as well. Let us strive to ensure people living with mental health conditions know that they are not alone, that hope exists, and that the possibility of healing and thriving is real. Together, we can help everyone get the support they need to recover as they continue along the journey to get well. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 2016 as National Mental Health Awareness Month. I call upon citizens, government agencies, organizations, health care providers, and research institutions to raise mental health awareness and continue helping Americans live longer, healthier lives. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-eighth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand sixteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fortieth.  
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Emmaz

Alcohol And Prozac?

18 posts in this topic

Posted

Hey Guys

It says on my medication fluxotine or whatever that im not allowed to drink alcohol? Im a depressed uni student and to be honest alcohol is keeping me going a heck of a lot, i cant not drink it. Advice? xxx

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Posted

I don't know what would happen if you mixed the two however... alcohol is a depressant. I used to party a lot with my friends (I'm 21) and it was perfectly normal drinking alcohol makes me a happy drunk but then eventually it starts catching up to me and I suffered one of my lowest episodes of depression and I couldn't pick myself up for a while. Now I can't drink at all because it just makes me feel much more depressed.

From what I know... fluoxetine can cause fatigue and sedation.. I've had experience with that but if you drink alcohol with a medication that can cause fatigue it's never good.

I knew someone who died (she was 24 and perfectly healthy) who took anti depressants because she drank one night with them and stopped breathing in her sleep. I don't know what type of anti- depressants but I don't think it's worth the risk...

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Posted

Its not that you can't drink, its that you should not drink. Why? Because it will only make your depression worse. I am not just saying that, i know from experience it will make you feel worse. If you truley want to feel better and less depressed try to stay away from alcohol.

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Posted

What if you only drink occasionally? I generally only have a glass maybe once or twice a month, if that. Would that affect it?

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Posted

I appreciate the replys guys... the thing is as much as it says shouldn't drink alcohol, alcohol is a depressant, dont mix with medication... it is hard to think of that when you drink to numb the pain... hmm.

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Posted

Doubt it Lily

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Posted

One of the main reasons you are advised not to drink with on psychiatric meds (other then alcohol being a depressant which can make things worse) is because it's harder on your liver. Both meds and alcohol are taxing on your liver. I am on prozac and I still drink. I am not proud of it. It is easy to use it as a method of self-medicating. Best to avoid it because what now is a drink here and there can, in a couple years, turn into substance abuse and dependence.

ellebi likes this

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Posted (edited)

I take generic Prozac and generic Wellbutrin Sr and my doctor gave me what I think is good advice about antidepressants and alcohol: Always try to keep it to 3 drinks or less. I notice that when I drink on these meds I get a little drunker, faster, so what I've done is really scale back my drinking. It seems to work for me and I don't have bad side effects from drinking on my meds.

Edited by Spiritual_Wanderer
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Posted

I'm not really at risk for alcohol abuse (I can barely stand the flavor to finish even one fruity cocktail), but I've been nervous so I've essentially abstained. I suppose a lot of people drink some and are totally fine, so maybe I should lighten up a little bit.

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Posted

I found that when I mixed the two when I first started taking prozac I broke into an uncontrollable rage.

Now I've found that I just get drunk easier.

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Posted

I personally have drank on Lexapro, Lyrica, Xanax, Valium etc etc Yes you feel like complete and utter horrible the next day and the hangovers are worse but it hasnt stopped me over the past 6years

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Posted

From my experience, alcohol completely negates the effect of Prozac. It would take several days to a week of abstaining before the good effects returned. Also, it is metabolized through the liver and you could be unecessarily over burdoning you liver with the mixture.

Sheepwoman

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Posted (edited)

Hi Emmaz,

I like your screen avatar.

There are several reasons why alcohol and anti-depressants like Prozac are a bad combination:

1. As others here have mentioned, alcohol can counteract the actions of the Prozac. Both drinking alcohol and Prozac cross the blood brain barrier. Depression causes biological disturbances in sleep. One of the effects of Prozac is to restore healthy sleep architecture as part of the healing process. Alcohol can provide sedation but disrupts sleep architecture at the very time one is taking Prozac to restore it. This is just example...

2. Your thought processes and mental alertness can be impaired, sometimes severely, sometimes paradoxically.

3. Combining the two can cause dangerous side effects, even paradoxical and unforeseen side effects

4. As mentioned above, liver toxicity

5. People with depression are at high risk for alcohol abuse and addition and so it is best to exercise great caution concerning the consumption of alcohol for this reason alone.

Sorry I couldn't be more helpful. I wish you the best!!!

Edited by Ep1ctetus

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Posted

From my experience I would avoid alcohol, I've been on Prozac for 2 months and had a large number of drinks on Saturday night and although I didn't have a hangover I felt so low on Sunday it reminded me of how I felt before taking Prozac and finally today after 3 days I feel back to normal. It's reminded me its not worth it for feeling like crap for days after.

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Posted

Alcohol is a depressant.

My ex BIL was manic- His dr prescribed Prozac and he drank-alot.

I think some people drink alot to counter-act the manic feeling,( i.e. if they should not be on Prozac in the first place.) My brother in law was not depressed, imo he was manic.

I wouldnt recommend it but its jmo.

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Posted

I am also on Prozac and made the choice to quit drinking. I have been sober for almost a week, and as someone who likes to drink, it's been tough. I've found my depression to be much worse when I was using substances and drinking so I'd like to see what the Prozac can do for me without the alcohol being involved.

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Posted

I am also on Prozac and made the choice to quit drinking. I have been sober for almost a week, and as someone who likes to drink, it's been tough. I've found my depression to be much worse when I was using substances and drinking so I'd like to see what the Prozac can do for me without the alcohol being involved.

I'm glad to hear you're staying sober! I don't drink much, I find that it messes with my meds a bit and makes me feel sad again.

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Posted

Mixing alcohol and medication can be serious. I know someone who died from mixing medications with alcohol.

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