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Endometriosis


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#1 dansfever

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 07:55 PM

Is it possible that depression could coinside with endometriosis? Endometriosis is like black worm holes on the uterus,ovaries, and other inner female parts. I have this and I am wondering if it is possible that my depression is having it's effect on it. Endmetriosis grows by have estrogen or way to much in your system. It is very painful if not treated. I have another medical problem called intersticial cystitis which is a perminet inffection in the bladder that can be treated and goes away but then it comes back again. With the two endometriosis and intersticial cystitis it cause many problems especially a lot of pain. To find out if you have it you go through two different out patient surgeries. I have been through 4 all together. Thought this would be an interesting topic for anyone interested.


Veronica

#2 Lindsay

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Posted 23 August 2006 - 01:41 AM

Is it possible that depression could coinside with endometriosis? Endometriosis is like black worm holes on the uterus,ovaries, and other inner female parts. I have this and I am wondering if it is possible that my depression is having it's effect on it. Endmetriosis grows by have estrogen or way to much in your system. It is very painful if not treated. I have another medical problem called intersticial cystitis which is a perminet inffection in the bladder that can be treated and goes away but then it comes back again. With the two endometriosis and intersticial cystitis it cause many problems especially a lot of pain. To find out if you have it you go through two different out patient surgeries. I have been through 4 all together. Thought this would be an interesting topic for anyone interested.


Veronica

((((((((((Veronica)))))))))))))),Welcome to the Forums, sweetheart.
I was a fellow endometriosis sufferer as well albeit I did not know it until my gyno/surgeon went in for a partial Hystorectomy at my request back in '93 as I had so much pain and bleeding from HUGE fibroid tumors and begged him to take out my uterous. I never regretted it. It hid a huge blood cyst on my right overy the size of a grapefruit that was ready to burst sand when he went in, it did. :shocked: (Enough of that)
Yes, I suffered from depression, I believe bipolar mood swings and PMDD and really never gave it a thought back then. Now I look back and :shocked: My best friend over the years suffered from intersticial cystitis and fun it was not. I will hopefully be able to cover that as well. :hearts:
Take very good care of yourself, darlin' and keep on posting...we care. :bump:
~Lindsay

Endometriosis and Depression

For reasons both physiological and psychological, depression can be a very real part of coping with Endometriosis. Those of you who feel alone in this, don't! You are among a great many who suffer silently as I did for years and years. Whether you are embarrassed or angry with yourself for not being able to 'snap out of it," don't despair. Depression can have it's hold on you so tightly and it's not your fault!

The definition of depression is, "a state of despondency characterized by feelings of inadequacy, lowered activity and pessimism about the future, and extreme state of unresponsiveness to stimuli, together with self-deprecation, delusions of inadequacy and hopelessness". Sadly, this definition implies a defect of character or weakness because you are suffering. Nothing is further from the truth.

In general, people experiencing depression feel hopeless. They may have feelings of worthlessness and experience a loss of interest in every-day activities such as work, hobbies or sex. Many factors can trigger depression such as: serious illness, divorce or the death of a loved one. Sometimes there is no apparent factor that triggers a depression.

Endometriosis can itself be an indirect trigger for depression as well. Women on hormonal therapies such as Lupron and Synarel experience a state of menopause in which their levels of naturally occurring hormones are dramatically diminished. Neuroendocrine studies have shown a correlation between depression and hormone deficiencies.This would be a biochemical reasons why your depression exists.

In surgery, nerves are cut and this destroys endocrine organs that produce hormones thus eliciting fewer hormones and creating a biological state of depression. The deficiency of tryptophan and beta endorphins plays a large role in depression. Patients treated with antidepressants which include tryptophan have shown an increase in brain endorphin levels. Naturally produced brain endorphins are stifled with hormonal therapies used for endometriosis which can result in depression.

Many times it is the inability to stop the pain that makes a woman become depressed. I know that has been the cause of depression time and time again for me. External factors can also cause depression including living conditions, relationship issues and weight gain to name only a few. In short, many factors can play a part in feeling low and depressed including nutrition, hormones, exercise or lack of thereof, lowered sexual activity, lack of familial or spousal support and lack of faith in your health provider.

If you consistently feel sad or despondent, seek help and talk to others. If you decide to seek professional help, choose a therapist who specializes in either Woman's health or Chronic Pain as these therapists will better understand your struggles. Your knowledgeable therapist will not only reassure you that you are normal, but also explain that there is a medical solution to your depression if need be.

In conjunction with medical therapy I also found that talking to other women who had the same disease helped a great deal. I encourage every woman to look for a support group on or offline in or around your area. You are not alone! Most of all, it is not your fault that you have this disease. You can't help the repercussions from it which include depression. I know that after suffering for many years thinking I could do it on my own I fell into a deep dark depression and I began to rely on my isolation to keep me safe. Whatever you do DON'T isolate! You will only become more depressed! It is a very real contributor to depression and those of us who have debilitating pain understand that it is not as simple as wanting to participate in our own lives. Sometimes or most of the time we feel we can't and that is an awful feeling. Friends go on without us and we begin to look and feel like flakes. No one understands or so it seems. We lose jobs, we're unable to contribute to the family financially or get an important project done or even make love to our partner. When this happens we suffer greatly.

Having said this don't give up! Most depression is treatable and can be successfully treated with anti depressants, life changes or psycho therapy. You and your doctor can decide what is best for you. Make sure to communicate with your friends and family as that is very important. Keep the lines of communication open and that will take you a long way.
Source:- Jenniferlewis.com


"Staging endometriosis is vitally important because all women with endometriosis are not the same." -- NICHD Researcher

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?
Most commonly, the symptoms of endometriosis start years after menstrual periods begin. Over the years, the symptoms tend to gradually increase as the endometriosis areas increase in size. After menopause, the abnormal implants shrink away and the symptoms subside. The most common symptom is pain, especially excessive menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea) which may be felt in the abdomen or lower back or pain during or after sexual activity (dyspareunia). Infertility occurs in about 30 to 40 percent of women with endometriosis. Rarely, the irritation caused by endometrial implants may progress into infection or abscesses causing pain independent of the menstrual cycle. Endometrial patches may also be tender to touch or pressure, and intestinal pain may also result from endometrial patches on the walls of the colon or intestine.

The amount of pain is not always related to the severity of the disease-some women with severe endometriosis have no pain; while others with just a few small growths have incapacitating pain.

Endometrial cancer is very rarely associated with endometriosis, occurring in less than 1 percent of women who have the disease. When it does occur, it is usually found in more advanced patches of endometriosis in older women and the long-term outlook in these unusual cases is reasonably good.

"While endometriosis is not a malignant disease, it does cause a lot of suffering and pain." -- NICHD Researcher

HOW IS ENDOMETRIOSIS RELATED TO FERTILITY PROBLEMS?
Severe endometriosis with extensive scarring and organ damage may affect fertility. It is considered one of the three major causes of female infertility. However, unsuspected or mild endometriosis is a common finding among infertile women and how this type of endometriosis affects fertility is still not clear. While the pregnancy rates for patients with endometriosis remain lower than those of the general population, most patients with endometriosis do not experience fertility problems.

"We do not have a clear understanding of the cause-effect relationship of endometriosis and infertility." -- NICHD Researcher

WHAT IS THE CAUSE OF ENDOMETRIOSIS?
The cause of endometriosis is still unknown. One theory is that during menstruation some of the menstrual tissue backs up through the fallopian tubes into the abdomen, where it implants and grows. Another theory suggests that endometriosis may be a genetic process or that certain families may have predisposing factors to endometriosis. In the latter view, endometriosis is seen as the tissue development process gone away.

Whatever the cause of endometriosis, its progression is influenced by various stimulating factors such as hormones or growth factors. In this regard, NICHD investigators are studying the role of the immune system in activating cells that may secrete factors which, in turn, stimulate endometriosis.

In addition to these new hypotheses, investigators are continuing to look into previous theories that endometriosis is a disease influenced by delayed childbearing. Since the hormones made by the placenta during pregnancy prevent ovulation, the progress of endometriosis is slowed or stopped during pregnancy and the total number of lifetime cycles is reduced for a woman who had multiple pregnancies.

HOW IS ENDOMETRIOSIS DIAGNOSED?
Diagnosis of endometriosis begins with a gynecologist evaluating the patient's medical history. A complete physical exam, including a pelvic examination, is also necessary. However, diagnosis of endometriosis is only complete when proven by a laparoscopy, a minor surgical procedure in which a laparoscope (a tube with a light in it) is inserted into a small incision in the abdomen. The laparoscope is moved around the abdomen, which has been distended with carbon dioxide gas to make the organs easier to see. The surgeon can then check the condition of the abdominal organs and see the endometrial implants. The laparoscopy will show the locations, extent, and size of the growths and will help the patient and her doctor make better-informed decisions about treatment.

"Endometriosis is a long-standing disease that often develops slowly." -- NICHD Researcher

WHAT IS THE TREATMENT?
While the treatment for endometriosis has varied over the years, doctors now agree that if the symptoms are mild, no further treatment other than medication for pain may be needed. For those patients with mild or minimal endometriosis who wish to become pregnant, doctors are advising that, depending on the age of the patient and the amount of pain associated with the disease, the best course of action is to have a trial period of unprotected intercourse for 6 months to 1 year. If pregnancy does not occur within that time, then further treatment may be needed.

For patients not seeking a pregnancy where treatment specific for the management of endometriosis is required and a definitive diagnosis of endometriosis by laparoscopy has been made, a physician may suggest hormone suppression treatment. Since this therapy shuts off ovulation, women being treated for endometriosis will not get pregnant during such therapy, although some may elect to become pregnant shortly after therapy is stopped.

Hormone treatment is most effective when the implants are small. The doctor may prescribe a weak synthetic male hormone called Danazol, a synthetic progesterone alone, or a combination of estrogen and progesterone such as oral contraceptives.

"We are finding good medical options without surgery. " --
NICHD Researcher

Danazol has become a more common treatment choice than either progesterone or the birth control pill. Disease symptoms are improved for 80 to 90 percent of the patients taking Danazol, and the size and the extent of implants are also reduced. While side effects with Danazol treatment are not uncommon (e.g., acne, hot flashes, or fluid retention), most of them are relatively mild and stop when treatment is stopped. Overall, pregnancy rates following this therapy depend on the severity of the disease. However, some recent studies have shown that with mild to minimal endometriosis, Danazol alone does not improve pregnancy rates.

It is important to remember that Danazol treatment is unsafe if there is any chance that a woman is pregnant. A fetus accidentally exposed to this drug may develop abnormally. For this same reason, although pregnancy is not likely while a woman is taking this drug, careful use of a barrier birth control method such as a diaphragm or condom is essential during this treatment.

Another type of hormone treatment is a synthetic pituitary hormone blocker called gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, or GnRH agonist. This treatment stops ovarian hormone production by blocking pituitary gland hormones that normally stimulate ovarian cycles.

These hormones are currently being tested using different methods of administration. One such treatment involves a drug that is administered as a nasal spray twice daily for 6 months and works by suppressing production of estrogen, which controls the growth of the endometrial tissue. Other treatments being developed in this category include daily or monthly hormone injections. One concern is the loss of bone mineral which occurs with this type of hormone therapy. This may limit the duration and frequency of this type of treatment.

While pregnancy rates for women with fertility problems resulting from endometriosis are fairly good with no therapy and with only a trial waiting period, there may be women who need more aggressive treatment. Those women who are older and who feel the need to become pregnant more quickly or those women who have severe physical changes due to the disease, may consider surgical treatment. Also, women who are not interested in pregnancy, but who have severe, debilitating pain, may also consider surgery.

Conservative surgery attempts to remove the diseased tissue without risking damage to healthy surrounding tissue. This surgery is called laparotomy and is performed in a hospital under anesthesia. Pregnancy rates are highest during the first year after surgery, as recurrences of endometriosis are fairly common. The specifics of the surgery should be discussed with a doctor.

Some patients may need more radical surgery to correct the damage caused by untreated endometriosis. Hysterectomy and removal of the ovaries may be the only treatment possible if the ovaries are badly damaged. In some cases, hysterectomy alone without the removal of the ovaries may be reasonable.

New surgical treatments are being developed that further utilize the laparoscope instead of full abdominal surgery. During routine laparoscopy, the surgeon can cauterize small areas of endometriosis. Other evolving techniques include using a laser during laparoscopy to vaporize abnormal tissue. This involves a shorter recovery time. Laparoscopy treatment is possible, however, only if the surgeon can see pelvic structures clearly through the laparoscope. These newer techniques should be performed by surgeons specializing in such delicate procedures. Although these techniques are promising, more study is needed to determine if they yield results comparable to conventional surgical management.

STAGES OF ENDOMETRIOSIS
Stages of endometriosis is determined by the sizes and amount of endometriosis found. Some women with advanced stages have had no pain, and some with minimal disease are incapacitated by pain or infertility.

Stage I - Minimal, (1cm - 5cm)
Stage II - Mild, (6cm - 15cm)
Stage III - Moderate, (16cm - 40cm)
Stage IV - Severe, (40+ cm)


WHERE TO LOOK FOR ANSWERS
Because endometriosis affects each woman differently, it is essential that the patient maintains a good, clear, honest communication with her doctor. For the single truth about endometriosis is that there are no clear-cut, universal answers. If pregnancy is an issue, then age may affect the treatment plan. If it is not an issue, then treatment decisions will depend primarily on the severity of symptoms.

Because these decisions can be difficult and confusing, there are organizations that provide information and offer support and help to those who are affected by this disease.

YOU AND YOUR DOCTOR
You should approach your health provider with a sense of self and self-dignity. After all, you are a competent individual who is aware of her own body. You should be armed with knowledge of your particular concerns and feel comfortable to speak freely and easily with your provider.

To be your own advocate, you must overcome certain prevailing realities. As much as your physician would like to, she or he may not be current on all of the newest and most effective technologies and developments associated with your situation. Do your own research and be able to understand what your options are.

Utilize the physician as you would a friend, not a God. Patient and physician must create a mutually effective relationship. As much as doctors can lead us to information and work with us, they cannot work entirely for us. Empower yourself by being an active participant in your health care. Your doctor will appreciate and respect you more. Knowing your options comes only out of doing your homework before meeting with your doctor. Doing your own research is fundamental to receiving the best care. To further improve your knowledge, bring a paper and a pencil with you to write down the topics of discussion. You may also opt for a small recorder if you want to listen to what your doctor said in full detail later. Some women benefit from keeping all their appointments and research in one notebook. Keeping a diary also prompts questions you may want to pose to your doctor

Sample Questions Include:

a) What are the benefits of doing this?
b) What are the risks?
c) What are my other options?
d) What should I do first?
e) What are the probable outcomes of each situation?
f) What is the probable outcome if I decide not to have this treatment?

Let your doctor know if you are uptight during an exam. Maybe your doctor hasn’t noticed that you’re clinging to the ceiling. My former gynecologist had Where’s Waldo pictures on the ceiling and it really helped.

But pain can’t be ignored or averted with a cartoon character. During the exam, if I wasn’t in the stirrups I surely would have knocked the doctor out with one fail swoop. It’s O.K. to ask your doctor to stop the exam. It’s your body and your pain.

The doctor will invariably ask what your pain is like and where it is located. Be prepared. Keeping a pain log can be helpful to both you and your doctor. It is important to know when and where your pain is localized. This information can help determine which times of the month and places you are most sensitive.

In short, Help your doctor help you. Be a an active health partner and you will notice a difference in how you feel as far as having a say in your health.

CONTRACT BETWEEN YOU AND YOUR DOCTOR
I got this piece of information from a fellow endometriosis sufferer. She put this together this list of what to each of you can expect fro a doctor/patient relationship.

I recomend printing this out and taking it with you when you are interviewing a doctor that might treat you and your disease. You may even go as far as printing it up and the Doctor, Office Manager, and you as the patient sign it and then one copy goes into your chart and you keep a copy.

WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT FROM ME THE PATIENT

* I will answer all questions as honestly as I can
* I will report all medications, vitamins, and whatever other treatments I am currently using
* I will only take the medications you prescribe me for the pain that goes along with this disease
* If the medications you prescribe for some reason dose not work I will call you immediately
* I will report all appointments that I have with other doctors. I will have any results of tests done at other facilities transfered into my file with this office
* I will listen to your advice. I will try to be open to trying new treatments when there is medical evidence that they may be helpful
* I am open to any new tests (or re-tests) you may want to try. However, I will not expect you to order tests unless there is sufficient reason to believe they should be tried. I do not expect, nor do I want, every test to be tried at random
* I do not expect a quick fix
I will accept it when you do not know what is wrong
* I will stay informed as to what is going on in research of this disease
* And I will inform you of anything that sounds like it might help me
* I will inform you of all possible side effects or pains from this disease I will not discount anything
* I will try to be patient with you, but understand this disease is very hard to live with. Patient/Doctor Contract

WHAT I HOPE I CAN EXPECT FROM YOU IS:

* You must be willing to accept a complex case with many unknowns
* You must be willing to work in a partnership with me. You must be willing to listen if I have information that may be related to my illness. We might disagree, but you should first listen to the information that I have
* You must accept that I am the final arbiter of what medicines I will take or treatments I will try
* You must be willing to consider an occasional referral outside the health care plan
* You must agree to fill out occasional forms if necessary. I will pre-fill out the forms to make them as painless as possible for you, of course they will be minus the information you must fill out
* You should not expect to fix me if you cannot. You must not become frustrated if and when I continue to be uncured
* You must keep up to date on any information concerning my disease and the treatments for it
* You must always be totally honest with me at all times
* You must always make sure that my medications will take care of the pain I am having
* You must never be short with me, on talk down to me in a time of crisis or pain
* You must understand that my husband or significant other is to be part of all of the decisions to be made in my case
* Finally, I hope you will persevere and will not give up even if we don't find any answers

Click here to find endometriosis definitions and glossary.

Source:- jenniferlewis.com


Be Well....

~Lindsay ღ , Forum Super Administrator
Founder, depressionforums.org


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"I cannot make my mark for all time...those concepts are mutually exclusive.
"Lasting effect" is a self -contradictory term.  Meaning does not exist in the future, nor do I.  
Nothing will have meaning, "ultimately."
Nothing will even mean tomorrow what it did today.  Meaning changes with the context.  
My meaningfulness is in the here and now. It is enough that I may be of value to someone today.
It is enough that I make a difference now."  ~Lindsay    
    

  
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#3 dansfever

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Posted 23 August 2006 - 06:59 PM

Thanks Lindsay I'm glad I'm not the only one. For your endometriosis did you get the depo shot and oral meds? Or did it end up being found during the hysterectomy?

#4 Lindsay

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Posted 24 August 2006 - 12:18 AM

Thanks Lindsay I'm glad I'm not the only one. For your endometriosis did you get the depo shot and oral meds? Or did it end up being found during the hysterectomy?

My endometriosis was found during the '1993 hysterectomy which was 'secondery' to the fibroids along with the blood cyst that burst when he opened me. It never shown on the ultrasounds, that is how large some of my fibroids were. :shocked: I was left with my left ovary as I requested. I do not regret it at all. (I PMS'ed every other month! :hearts: ) I imagine the worst pain I had was from the endometriosis?
I am so out of estrogen now since 2000. Then my dear Dr puts me on Estrace for 4 yrs and I never had a hot flash, I felt great and then I decided to stop when I found a lump in my breast which turned out benign, thank G_d. Now I get hot flashes.... Fun.
So I now have fibromyalgia and Myofacial Pain Syndrome, and...It never ends.. :shocked:
How are you doing right now darlin'? What meds are you on and what are your Dr's doing for you?
May I ask your age and if you have had children? I'll understand if you do not wish to reveal your 'story'. :bump:

Soft Hugs,

Be Well....

~Lindsay ღ , Forum Super Administrator
Founder, depressionforums.org


Forum Super Administrator
DF member since June 2001 goldenvelope1jr.gif  

----
"I cannot make my mark for all time...those concepts are mutually exclusive.
"Lasting effect" is a self -contradictory term.  Meaning does not exist in the future, nor do I.  
Nothing will have meaning, "ultimately."
Nothing will even mean tomorrow what it did today.  Meaning changes with the context.  
My meaningfulness is in the here and now. It is enough that I may be of value to someone today.
It is enough that I make a difference now."  ~Lindsay    
    

  
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#5 dansfever

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 06:34 PM

Lindsay,

No don't mind you asking. I'm 22yrs old, fience 23yrs old nither have children at all. I use to take a depo injection and an oral med ( all out now). I have no insurance so I am on my own for everything medically wrong. I haven't had a menstrel cycle in about 6-7 monthes. The endometriosis meds put me basically into metipause and the hot flashes. My hot flashes last all day and into the night and there is no stopping it either. :veryangry: :censored: I can't wait til everything gets back on track.

#6 turtlekidd

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Posted 26 August 2006 - 03:17 PM

I too had endo & I have IC. The endo was discovered during a hyster in 2004. The IC is new but I have had for 10+ years.

I have been depressed all my life. And I had a mentally ill mother so as a child I think the depression kept me safe.

I always wonder if it is connected to antibiotics. I was a really sick child until the age of 4.5 when they took my tonsils out. We used to keep quart sized bottles of antibiotics in the fridge. I just feel there must be a connection.

Just a thought.

Edited by Gonzo, 26 August 2006 - 06:13 PM.

Safe Journey.
Major Depression, PTSD, DID, Anxiety, Chronic Pain, IBS, IC.
MEDS: Cymbalta, Klonopin, Trazadone, Ultram.

#7 dansfever

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Posted 28 August 2006 - 05:59 PM

Turtlekidd

I have IC also. SO you are not alone. If you send me a PM then I can give you a site for IC if you don't already have one?...


Veronica

#8 Beanchop99

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 01:07 PM

I, too, have endometriosis. I also have ovarian cysts. I was diagnosed in '90 after a laparoscopy, which was performed because my ob/gyn suspected endo.

I went to 5 ob/gyns until I found one who believed that the pain was real. I had a doc who said the pain was in my head. I had docs that said all woman get cramps & I was just overly sensitive to the pain. I even had 1 doc who said I had gas! I said, "For 7 years? Don't you think I would have exploded by now?"

The endo pain and heavy periods were horrendous during my 20's. Now in my late mid 30's, I've found that the pain has all but subsided. The heavy periods continue, however.

I never connected endo with depression, but I'm thinking that way now.

Lindsay: Thanks for the great info!

-Bean

#9 downforthecount

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 10:28 PM

I have Endometriosis and major depression. I NEVER thought that the two could possibly be connected. HMMMMMMM, food for thought. By the by, I had Hydrothermabulation done in October 2005. It burns your uterus to cause scar tissue to form, ergo, plugging the holes that allow the endometrium to leak into the body. It is also "supposed" to reduce the heavy periods and reduce the pain. I am still waiting. I have stopped leaking tissue so big it feels like I am having twins all over again, but the rest is still there.
I tried the hydro therapy first because I wanted to go through menopause when nature decided, not when my gynodoc decided. Now I wish I had done the hysterectomy instead.
Well, if wished were pennies.......

#10 susan_ny

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 08:39 PM

This is an interesting thread. I have suffered from endo and adenomyosis for 13 years. I've had seven surgeries, went through infertility treatment, suffered two miscarriages and finally was blessed with twins who are now seven. I finally had a hysterectomy in 2004 and six months ago had my last remaining ovary removed. Now that I'm in surgical menopause, I am constantly irritable, on edge and generally ticked off at the world. I don't feel sad, although my normal winter "blahs" are a little harder to shake this year than usual. My doctor seems to think it's all hormone related, as opposed to true clinical depression. I don't know what it is but I know that I hate feeling like this. I just want to feel like a normal person again and stop snapping at everyone for no reason.

I have recently started having pain again similar to what I experienced with the endo/adeno, and my doctor thinks I may have interstitial cystitis. I'm having a bladder test done next week which should hopefully tell us more. I really thought with my last surgery that I'd be putting this pain behind me forever, but with a potential IC diagnosis looming, I'm wondering if I'll ever be pain free. I guess that, too, could be contributing to my moodiness.

#11 JenniferM

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 07:15 AM

I may be asking a crazy question here but my mom had a hysterectomy back in her late 20's bc of Endometriosis. Do I stand a chance of getting Endo bc she had it.? I am 32 and have never really had any female trouble, well not as of yet anyway. What are my chances?

#12 Starfish139

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 07:39 AM

I have endo and had a lap done back in April.I am sure it came right back.What a waste.I am pretty sure that the Depo CAUSED my endo as I didn't have any trouble or pain before.The Depo sent me through thre roof with depression,anxiety,and panic attacks and it took me about 2 years to start feeling better.Now I'm right back where I started since I used Chantix.Ugh....

#13 Belle29

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Posted 21 December 2007 - 07:47 PM

I have endo and had a lap done back in April.I am sure it came right back.What a waste.I am pretty sure that the Depo CAUSED my endo as I didn't have any trouble or pain before.The Depo sent me through thre roof with depression,anxiety,and panic attacks and it took me about 2 years to start feeling better.Now I'm right back where I started since I used Chantix.Ugh....


Hi Starfish,

I've never had the Depo, but do have endo and wanted to say I can relate to the pain it causes and am really sorry you're having to deal with this. ((((((hugs))))))) Can also definitely relate to anxiety/depression issues! I haven't had the lap tho they recommended it for endo removal. One of very reasons I didn't have it done was b/c I was scared it would come back....worse than it is now. Feel free to pm me if you ever want to talk. Hope you start to feel better soon, take care and best wishes to you, Belle

#14 Evie

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Posted 12 April 2008 - 07:11 PM

I have endometriosis and I have to say it really brings me down. My doctor refused to believe it at first as I am apparently too young (17) as the age it turns up in is late twenties - as I pointed out, that is when they actually look for it.

It is agony and the pain is the kindof pain that makes you vomit, I usually have to take two days off of college/work a month because I can usually hardly move. Whilst not moving, I get very very down.

#15 dansfever

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Posted 24 September 2008 - 05:32 PM

Well all the endo was kinda under control till found out was preg. it flared bace up again when it was suppose to go away totally and completely away after you get preg. i guess im the weirdo....lol the IC has not come back yet but i still have to watch what i eat and drink.

#16 barbiegirl

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 07:08 PM

I have endo too, I was diagnosed officially via biopsy in 2003 (I was 20 at the time) however I had been suffering with endo symptoms since age 13. My horrendous pain and heavy bleeding was basically dismissed by doctors, even when I was passing out from pain and blood loss on a regular basis. I have had laparoscopic excisions (don't have laser ablation or cautery- it is a waste of time) in 2003, 2004 and 2009 (in addition to a mini laparotomy to remove an endometrioma from my abdominal muscles.

I have taken the pill continuously for years, however last year I decided to try bio identical transdermal progesterone cream instead and it is great. I also (being a nutritionist) strongly believe in the power of diet in reducing inflammation and to help balance hormones. It has really helped me, jumping from 18 months to 5 years between surgeries once I implemented anti inflammatory and estrogen balancing nutritional techniques.

I don't know if endo causes depression directly, but being in severe pain and nutrient deficiencies (such as B12 loss from heavy bleeding) both can cause depression and many other psychological pathologies. Who wouldn't be depressed and anxious being in severe pain all the time, taking strong hormonal medications and having surgery all the time? It takes its toll on a person. Frequent childhood illness and antibiotic use has been linked to endo as it is believed to have a strong immune componenet of etiology- either auto immune or immuno-deficiency depending on the study you look at. We do however know that Sampon's theory of retrograde menstrual flow is incorrect, as there was a study done recently finding biopsy confirmed endometriosis in 3/36 human female fetuses at necropsy.

Hopefully more doctors will read these studies and educate themselves about endo, and not continue to just blindly believe the old thought that endo is a uncommon mild disease of the white, childless career woman in her 30's or 40's that is cured by hysterectomy, as this just isn't the case.

#17 criggs88

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 12:45 AM

I have endometriosis as well. Suffered since I was 12 (21 now). Didn't have surgery til after I had my so at 19. By the way it felt the endometriosis was nonexistent while preggo. In less than 3 years I have had 5 laproscopic surgeries. It seems after each surgery, once I recovered from the soreness, it was back and WORSE! I've finally decided the surgeries will never work for me. I have tried tons of bc to stop the bleeding to stop endometriosis. The depoprovera and depolupron made me bleed constantly. Dr even tried double the normal dose.some pills helped but I became tolerant and started bleeding constantly. The nuvaring ring helped some, but became tolerant to that too. I've tried other hormone therapies, diet and exercise. I have no will power for diet (hate fish and to lazy to cook for myself all the time). And never have time to exercise with work and being a single mom. I've taken pain killers for years! Always tried not to take it unless I really need it as I did not want to become addicted to it. But I started Zoloft and am now addicted to pain killers, smoking, and soda. That's a different topic though. Now a bottle of 30 pills only last 2 1/2 days.

I always thought my depression came from stress and lack of routine at work. But now that I think of it, its a vicious circle. Endometriosis causes pain, causing poor work results, causing stress, causing depression and heavier periods, causing worse endometriosis!

Hmmmmm.... interesting.
***Casey***

-I will not let this conquer me.-
-I will conquer it and come out stronger!-

#18 trilher

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 10:19 PM

Is it possible that depression could coinside with endometriosis? Endometriosis is like black worm holes on the uterus,ovaries, and other inner female parts. I have this and I am wondering if it is possible that my depression is having it's effect on it. Endmetriosis grows by have estrogen or way to much in your system. It is very painful if not treated. I have another medical problem called intersticial cystitis which is a perminet inffection in the bladder that can be treated and goes away but then it comes back again. With the two endometriosis and intersticial cystitis it cause many problems especially a lot of pain. To find out if you have it you go through two different out patient surgeries. I have been through 4 all together. Thought this would be an interesting topic for anyone interested.


Veronica

((((((((((Veronica)))))))))))))),Welcome to the Forums, sweetheart.
I was a fellow endometriosis sufferer as well albeit I did not know it until my gyno/surgeon went in for a partial Hystorectomy at my request back in '93 as I had so much pain and bleeding from HUGE fibroid tumors and begged him to take out my uterous. I never regretted it. It hid a huge blood cyst on my right overy the size of a grapefruit that was ready to burst sand when he went in, it did. :shocked: (Enough of that)
Yes, I suffered from depression, I believe bipolar mood swings and PMDD and really never gave it a thought back then. Now I look back and :shocked: My best friend over the years suffered from intersticial cystitis and fun it was not. I will hopefully be able to cover that as well. :hearts:
Take very good care of yourself, darlin' and keep on posting...we care. :bump:
~Lindsay

Endometriosis and Depression

For reasons both physiological and psychological, depression can be a very real part of coping with Endometriosis. Those of you who feel alone in this, don't! You are among a great many who suffer silently as I did for years and years. Whether you are embarrassed or angry with yourself for not being able to 'snap out of it," don't despair. Depression can have it's hold on you so tightly and it's not your fault!

The definition of depression is, "a state of despondency characterized by feelings of inadequacy, lowered activity and pessimism about the future, and extreme state of unresponsiveness to stimuli, together with self-deprecation, delusions of inadequacy and hopelessness". Sadly, this definition implies a defect of character or weakness because you are suffering. Nothing is further from the truth.

In general, people experiencing depression feel hopeless. They may have feelings of worthlessness and experience a loss of interest in every-day activities such as work, hobbies or sex. Many factors can trigger depression such as: serious illness, divorce or the death of a loved one. Sometimes there is no apparent factor that triggers a depression.

Endometriosis can itself be an indirect trigger for depression as well. Women on hormonal therapies such as Lupron and Synarel experience a state of menopause in which their levels of naturally occurring hormones are dramatically diminished. Neuroendocrine studies have shown a correlation between depression and hormone deficiencies.This would be a biochemical reasons why your depression exists.

In surgery, nerves are cut and this destroys endocrine organs that produce hormones thus eliciting fewer hormones and creating a biological state of depression. The deficiency of tryptophan and beta endorphins plays a large role in depression. Patients treated with antidepressants which include tryptophan have shown an increase in brain endorphin levels. Naturally produced brain endorphins are stifled with hormonal therapies used for endometriosis which can result in depression.

Many times it is the inability to stop the pain that makes a woman become depressed. I know that has been the cause of depression time and time again for me. External factors can also cause depression including living conditions, relationship issues and weight gain to name only a few. In short, many factors can play a part in feeling low and depressed including nutrition, hormones, exercise or lack of thereof, lowered sexual activity, lack of familial or spousal support and lack of faith in your health provider.

If you consistently feel sad or despondent, seek help and talk to others. If you decide to seek professional help, choose a therapist who specializes in either Woman's health or Chronic Pain as these therapists will better understand your struggles. Your knowledgeable therapist will not only reassure you that you are normal, but also explain that there is a medical solution to your depression if need be.

In conjunction with medical therapy I also found that talking to other women who had the same disease helped a great deal. I encourage every woman to look for a support group on or offline in or around your area. You are not alone! Most of all, it is not your fault that you have this disease. You can't help the repercussions from it which include depression. I know that after suffering for many years thinking I could do it on my own I fell into a deep dark depression and I began to rely on my isolation to keep me safe. Whatever you do DON'T isolate! You will only become more depressed! It is a very real contributor to depression and those of us who have debilitating pain understand that it is not as simple as wanting to participate in our own lives. Sometimes or most of the time we feel we can't and that is an awful feeling. Friends go on without us and we begin to look and feel like flakes. No one understands or so it seems. We lose jobs, we're unable to contribute to the family financially or get an important project done or even make love to our partner. When this happens we suffer greatly.

Having said this don't give up! Most depression is treatable and can be successfully treated with anti depressants, life changes or psycho therapy. You and your doctor can decide what is best for you. Make sure to communicate with your friends and family as that is very important. Keep the lines of communication open and that will take you a long way.
Source:- Jenniferlewis.com


"Staging endometriosis is vitally important because all women with endometriosis are not the same." -- NICHD Researcher

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?
Most commonly, the symptoms of endometriosis start years after menstrual periods begin. Over the years, the symptoms tend to gradually increase as the endometriosis areas increase in size. After menopause, the abnormal implants shrink away and the symptoms subside. The most common symptom is pain, especially excessive menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea) which may be felt in the abdomen or lower back or pain during or after sexual activity (dyspareunia). Infertility occurs in about 30 to 40 percent of women with endometriosis. Rarely, the irritation caused by endometrial implants may progress into infection or abscesses causing pain independent of the menstrual cycle. Endometrial patches may also be tender to touch or pressure, and intestinal pain may also result from endometrial patches on the walls of the colon or intestine.

The amount of pain is not always related to the severity of the disease-some women with severe endometriosis have no pain; while others with just a few small growths have incapacitating pain.

Endometrial cancer is very rarely associated with endometriosis, occurring in less than 1 percent of women who have the disease. When it does occur, it is usually found in more advanced patches of endometriosis in older women and the long-term outlook in these unusual cases is reasonably good.

"While endometriosis is not a malignant disease, it does cause a lot of suffering and pain." -- NICHD Researcher

HOW IS ENDOMETRIOSIS RELATED TO FERTILITY PROBLEMS?
Severe endometriosis with extensive scarring and organ damage may affect fertility. It is considered one of the three major causes of female infertility. However, unsuspected or mild endometriosis is a common finding among infertile women and how this type of endometriosis affects fertility is still not clear. While the pregnancy rates for patients with endometriosis remain lower than those of the general population, most patients with endometriosis do not experience fertility problems.

"We do not have a clear understanding of the cause-effect relationship of endometriosis and infertility." -- NICHD Researcher

WHAT IS THE CAUSE OF ENDOMETRIOSIS?
The cause of endometriosis is still unknown. One theory is that during menstruation some of the menstrual tissue backs up through the fallopian tubes into the abdomen, where it implants and grows. Another theory suggests that endometriosis may be a genetic process or that certain families may have predisposing factors to endometriosis. In the latter view, endometriosis is seen as the tissue development process gone away.

Whatever the cause of endometriosis, its progression is influenced by various stimulating factors such as hormones or growth factors. In this regard, NICHD investigators are studying the role of the immune system in activating cells that may secrete factors which, in turn, stimulate endometriosis.

In addition to these new hypotheses, investigators are continuing to look into previous theories that endometriosis is a disease influenced by delayed childbearing. Since the hormones made by the placenta during pregnancy prevent ovulation, the progress of endometriosis is slowed or stopped during pregnancy and the total number of lifetime cycles is reduced for a woman who had multiple pregnancies.

HOW IS ENDOMETRIOSIS DIAGNOSED?
Diagnosis of endometriosis begins with a gynecologist evaluating the patient's medical history. A complete physical exam, including a pelvic examination, is also necessary. However, diagnosis of endometriosis is only complete when proven by a laparoscopy, a minor surgical procedure in which a laparoscope (a tube with a light in it) is inserted into a small incision in the abdomen. The laparoscope is moved around the abdomen, which has been distended with carbon dioxide gas to make the organs easier to see. The surgeon can then check the condition of the abdominal organs and see the endometrial implants. The laparoscopy will show the locations, extent, and size of the growths and will help the patient and her doctor make better-informed decisions about treatment.

"Endometriosis is a long-standing disease that often develops slowly." -- NICHD Researcher

WHAT IS THE TREATMENT?
While the treatment for endometriosis has varied over the years, doctors now agree that if the symptoms are mild, no further treatment other than medication for pain may be needed. For those patients with mild or minimal endometriosis who wish to become pregnant, doctors are advising that, depending on the age of the patient and the amount of pain associated with the disease, the best course of action is to have a trial period of unprotected intercourse for 6 months to 1 year. If pregnancy does not occur within that time, then further treatment may be needed.

For patients not seeking a pregnancy where treatment specific for the management of endometriosis is required and a definitive diagnosis of endometriosis by laparoscopy has been made, a physician may suggest hormone suppression treatment. Since this therapy shuts off ovulation, women being treated for endometriosis will not get pregnant during such therapy, although some may elect to become pregnant shortly after therapy is stopped.

Hormone treatment is most effective when the implants are small. The doctor may prescribe a weak synthetic male hormone called Danazol, a synthetic progesterone alone, or a combination of estrogen and progesterone such as oral contraceptives.

"We are finding good medical options without surgery. " --
NICHD Researcher

Danazol has become a more common treatment choice than either progesterone or the birth control pill. Disease symptoms are improved for 80 to 90 percent of the patients taking Danazol, and the size and the extent of implants are also reduced. While side effects with Danazol treatment are not uncommon (e.g., acne, hot flashes, or fluid retention), most of them are relatively mild and stop when treatment is stopped. Overall, pregnancy rates following this therapy depend on the severity of the disease. However, some recent studies have shown that with mild to minimal endometriosis, Danazol alone does not improve pregnancy rates.

It is important to remember that Danazol treatment is unsafe if there is any chance that a woman is pregnant. A fetus accidentally exposed to this drug may develop abnormally. For this same reason, although pregnancy is not likely while a woman is taking this drug, careful use of a barrier birth control method such as a diaphragm or condom is essential during this treatment.

Another type of hormone treatment is a synthetic pituitary hormone blocker called gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, or GnRH agonist. This treatment stops ovarian hormone production by blocking pituitary gland hormones that normally stimulate ovarian cycles.

These hormones are currently being tested using different methods of administration. One such treatment involves a drug that is administered as a nasal spray twice daily for 6 months and works by suppressing production of estrogen, which controls the growth of the endometrial tissue. Other treatments being developed in this category include daily or monthly hormone injections. One concern is the loss of bone mineral which occurs with this type of hormone therapy. This may limit the duration and frequency of this type of treatment.

While pregnancy rates for women with fertility problems resulting from endometriosis are fairly good with no therapy and with only a trial waiting period, there may be women who need more aggressive treatment. Those women who are older and who feel the need to become pregnant more quickly or those women who have severe physical changes due to the disease, may consider surgical treatment. Also, women who are not interested in pregnancy, but who have severe, debilitating pain, may also consider surgery.

Conservative surgery attempts to remove the diseased tissue without risking damage to healthy surrounding tissue. This surgery is called laparotomy and is performed in a hospital under anesthesia. Pregnancy rates are highest during the first year after surgery, as recurrences of endometriosis are fairly common. The specifics of the surgery should be discussed with a doctor.

Some patients may need more radical surgery to correct the damage caused by untreated endometriosis. Hysterectomy and removal of the ovaries may be the only treatment possible if the ovaries are badly damaged. In some cases, hysterectomy alone without the removal of the ovaries may be reasonable.

New surgical treatments are being developed that further utilize the laparoscope instead of full abdominal surgery. During routine laparoscopy, the surgeon can cauterize small areas of endometriosis. Other evolving techniques include using a laser during laparoscopy to vaporize abnormal tissue. This involves a shorter recovery time. Laparoscopy treatment is possible, however, only if the surgeon can see pelvic structures clearly through the laparoscope. These newer techniques should be performed by surgeons specializing in such delicate procedures. Although these techniques are promising, more study is needed to determine if they yield results comparable to conventional surgical management.

STAGES OF ENDOMETRIOSIS
Stages of endometriosis is determined by the sizes and amount of endometriosis found. Some women with advanced stages have had no pain, and some with minimal disease are incapacitated by pain or infertility.

Stage I - Minimal, (1cm - 5cm)
Stage II - Mild, (6cm - 15cm)
Stage III - Moderate, (16cm - 40cm)
Stage IV - Severe, (40+ cm)


WHERE TO LOOK FOR ANSWERS
Because endometriosis affects each woman differently, it is essential that the patient maintains a good, clear, honest communication with her doctor. For the single truth about endometriosis is that there are no clear-cut, universal answers. If pregnancy is an issue, then age may affect the treatment plan. If it is not an issue, then treatment decisions will depend primarily on the severity of symptoms.

Because these decisions can be difficult and confusing, there are organizations that provide information and offer support and help to those who are affected by this disease.

YOU AND YOUR DOCTOR
You should approach your health provider with a sense of self and self-dignity. After all, you are a competent individual who is aware of her own body. You should be armed with knowledge of your particular concerns and feel comfortable to speak freely and easily with your provider.

To be your own advocate, you must overcome certain prevailing realities. As much as your physician would like to, she or he may not be current on all of the newest and most effective technologies and developments associated with your situation. Do your own research and be able to understand what your options are.

Utilize the physician as you would a friend, not a God. Patient and physician must create a mutually effective relationship. As much as doctors can lead us to information and work with us, they cannot work entirely for us. Empower yourself by being an active participant in your health care. Your doctor will appreciate and respect you more. Knowing your options comes only out of doing your homework before meeting with your doctor. Doing your own research is fundamental to receiving the best care. To further improve your knowledge, bring a paper and a pencil with you to write down the topics of discussion. You may also opt for a small recorder if you want to listen to what your doctor said in full detail later. Some women benefit from keeping all their appointments and research in one notebook. Keeping a diary also prompts questions you may want to pose to your doctor

Sample Questions Include:

a) What are the benefits of doing this?
b) What are the risks?
c) What are my other options?
d) What should I do first?
e) What are the probable outcomes of each situation?
f) What is the probable outcome if I decide not to have this treatment?

Let your doctor know if you are uptight during an exam. Maybe your doctor hasnít noticed that youíre clinging to the ceiling. My former gynecologist had Whereís Waldo pictures on the ceiling and it really helped.

But pain canít be ignored or averted with a cartoon character. During the exam, if I wasnít in the stirrups I surely would have knocked the doctor out with one fail swoop. Itís O.K. to ask your doctor to stop the exam. Itís your body and your pain.

The doctor will invariably ask what your pain is like and where it is located. Be prepared. Keeping a pain log can be helpful to both you and your doctor. It is important to know when and where your pain is localized. This information can help determine which times of the month and places you are most sensitive.

In short, Help your doctor help you. Be a an active health partner and you will notice a difference in how you feel as far as having a say in your health.

CONTRACT BETWEEN YOU AND YOUR DOCTOR
I got this piece of information from a fellow endometriosis sufferer. She put this together this list of what to each of you can expect fro a doctor/patient relationship.

I recomend printing this out and taking it with you when you are interviewing a doctor that might treat you and your disease. You may even go as far as printing it up and the Doctor, Office Manager, and you as the patient sign it and then one copy goes into your chart and you keep a copy.

WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT FROM ME THE PATIENT

* I will answer all questions as honestly as I can
* I will report all medications, vitamins, and whatever other treatments I am currently using
* I will only take the medications you prescribe me for the pain that goes along with this disease
* If the medications you prescribe for some reason dose not work I will call you immediately
* I will report all appointments that I have with other doctors. I will have any results of tests done at other facilities transfered into my file with this office
* I will listen to your advice. I will try to be open to trying new treatments when there is medical evidence that they may be helpful
* I am open to any new tests (or re-tests) you may want to try. However, I will not expect you to order tests unless there is sufficient reason to believe they should be tried. I do not expect, nor do I want, every test to be tried at random
* I do not expect a quick fix
I will accept it when you do not know what is wrong
* I will stay informed as to what is going on in research of this disease
* And I will inform you of anything that sounds like it might help me
* I will inform you of all possible side effects or pains from this disease I will not discount anything
* I will try to be patient with you, but understand this disease is very hard to live with. Patient/Doctor Contract

WHAT I HOPE I CAN EXPECT FROM YOU IS:

* You must be willing to accept a complex case with many unknowns
* You must be willing to work in a partnership with me. You must be willing to listen if I have information that may be related to my illness. We might disagree, but you should first listen to the information that I have
* You must accept that I am the final arbiter of what medicines I will take or treatments I will try
* You must be willing to consider an occasional referral outside the health care plan
* You must agree to fill out occasional forms if necessary. I will pre-fill out the forms to make them as painless as possible for you, of course they will be minus the information you must fill out
* You should not expect to fix me if you cannot. You must not become frustrated if and when I continue to be uncured
* You must keep up to date on any information concerning my disease and the treatments for it
* You must always be totally honest with me at all times
* You must always make sure that my medications will take care of the pain I am having
* You must never be short with me, on talk down to me in a time of crisis or pain
* You must understand that my husband or significant other is to be part of all of the decisions to be made in my case
* Finally, I hope you will persevere and will not give up even if we don't find any answers

Click here to find endometriosis definitions and glossary.

Source:- jenniferlewis.com



Hi Veronica,

I am so sorry you are being challenged with Endometriosis (((((Veronica)))) I really did not know much about it except a few friends had it and I knew it caused a lot of pain. Along with the uncertainty of how it would impact their lives came depression. Four years ago my 30 year old daughter started coughing up blood monthly. After several hospitalizations she was sent to a Pulmonary Specialists. MRI's were done which showed a spot on her right lung the size of a small walnut. They biopsied some tissue and found that she has Endometriosis in her lung. They found that when she menstrated the estrogen also signaled the spot to bleed and therefore she would cough up blood for the duration of the cycle. Although we live in a progressive state, most Dr's including her Pulmonologist had read of this in text books in Med School but had never seen it in a real person. They recommended the removal of her ovaries....she at the time was thinking that she may want another child so they put her on the shot that stops your period (sorry can't think of the name) and that stopped the bleeding for almost 3 years. It has now started up again and we are going through the whole process and she will probably go ahead and have her ovaries removed. A cat scan has shown that it has grown larger. When she bleeds that one lungs cramps just like a uterus shedding and is very painful. She feels like she is having a heart attack which causes a lot of stress and anxiety. The uncertainty of what will happen also causes her depression. I had never heard of this before, but from my understand once a cell sloughs and gets into the blood stream it can attach itself anywhere. There are even a few cases where it has logged in the brain and cause severe strokes in women.

Hoping you will feel well soon and know that you are not alone. I think your feelings are pretty common and very understandable.
Take Care,
Trilher




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