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I Use To Have Ocd


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#1 Tink2104

Tink2104

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 04:43 PM

Hey, I just saw this forum and it sort of stuck out to me. I use to have OCD back in High School, i'm now 18 and at college. My OCD was in the form of horrific nightmarish thoughts, thoughts that pretty much took over my life. I remember I had to excuse myself from some of my class lessons because may be they were watching a violent film (History I remember a very gory one where someone got stabbed) next thing I know or later on after seeing that film the horrific thoughts just came one after another and never seemed to go and sometimes got worse. Usually the thoughts were me doing something to hurt a loved one (obviously i'm not mental and I didn't want to hurt them) this is just what these thoughts do and wow when you dod get something like this you really do feel a bit messed up in the head. However I'm glad to say that I don't have these anymore (thank god) and I was apparently more on the borderline of having OCD as I had to go through this test at the time so they could tell me if I did have OCD or not. Mine only went because I refered myself to a doctor who then put me in contact with a childrens bethel centre (I'm thankful to them for getting rid of this) I remember the first sessions I had went on for about a month may be more, things seemed to be getting better and I was happy to say that nearly all the thoughts had gone therefore there was no need for me to go anymore, but I was wrong and so were they, after a few weeks free the thoughts entered my head again and I was forced to go back to the bethel a second time, by this time I was pretty much use to the place and felt as ease on my first appointment, I remember I had to go and see some other lady before I actually had my appointment, she asked me a bunch of questions and then I was taken to see a youngish lady say in her late twenties. She was really nice and even added in a bit of humour to each session which made me less anxious to talk about the thoughts. She took me through several tests that seemed to help me a lot and then eventually she began to explain what was happening to me...hold on one sec I think I still have the sheets she wrote on so I could understand what was wrong with me... so these are the things i've found so far to of helped me or got me through that rough patch in my life - (may be these could help you if you are finding yourself in the same boat as me)

she gave me progressive muscular relaxation to try- this for me really helped though I felt like a fool doing it infront of the lady on each session. (look it up)
basic breathing exercises which enabled me to relax more
one good thing I had to keep reminding myself of is 'that the worry or thought your having will become less intense and die after a matter of a few seconds'

and this is what the internet says about this type of OCD...

''Intrusive thoughts are unwelcome involuntary thoughts, images, or unpleasant ideas that may become obsessions, are upsetting or distressing, and can be difficult to manage or eliminate.1 Most people experience these thoughts. When they are associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), depression, and sometimes attention-deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD), they may become paralyzing, anxiety-provoking, or persistent. Intrusive thoughts may also be associated with episodic memory, unwanted worries or memories from OCD,1 posttraumatic stress disorder, other anxiety disorders, eating disorders, or psyshosis.3 According to Lee Baer (a specialist at the OCD clinic of Massachusetts General Hospital, intrusive thoughts, urges, and iges are of inappropriate things at inappropriate times, usually falling into three categories: "inappropriate aggressive thoughts, inappropriate sexual thoughts, or blasphemous religious thoughts".

I just want you to know that they won't always be there and that it does take time to get rid of them. But also realise that it is normal and that we aren't mental or ill. This is a very common disorder...I would personally recomend a psychiatrist to help you...

Just thought i'd try to help
Tink

Edited by lindahurt, 29 October 2011 - 01:39 PM.





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