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      National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2016   05/01/2016

      Proclamation 9433 of April 28, 2016 National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2016 A Proclamation Nearly 44 million American adults, and millions of children, experience mental health conditions each year, including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and post-traumatic stress. Although we have made progress expanding mental health coverage and elevating the conversation about mental health, too many people still do not get the help they need. Our Nation is founded on the belief that we must look out for one another—and whether it affects our family members, friends, co-workers, or those unknown to us—we do a service for each other when we reach out and help those struggling with mental health issues. This month, we renew our commitment to ridding our society of the stigma associated with mental illness, encourage those living with mental health conditions to get the help they need, and reaffirm our pledge to ensure those who need help have access to the support, acceptance, and resources they deserve. In the last 7 years, our country has made extraordinary progress in expanding mental health coverage for more people across America. The Affordable Care Act prohibits insurance companies from discriminating against people based on pre-existing conditions, requires coverage of mental health and substance use disorder services in individual and small group markets, and expands mental health and substance use disorder parity policies, which are estimated to help more than 60 million Americans. Nearly 15 million more Americans have gained Medicaid coverage since October 2013, significantly improving access to mental health care. And because of more than $100 million in funding from the Affordable Care Act, community health centers have expanded behavioral health services for nearly 900,000 people nationwide over the past 2 years. Still, far too few Americans experiencing mental illnesses do not receive the care and treatment they need. That is why my most recent Budget proposal includes a new half-billion dollar investment to improve access to mental health care, engage individuals with serious mental illness in care, and help ensure behavioral health care systems work for everyone. Our Nation has made strong advances in improving prevention, increasing early intervention, and expanding treatment of mental illnesses. Earlier this year, I established a Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Parity Task Force, which aims to ensure that coverage for mental health benefits is comparable to coverage for medical and surgical care, improve understanding of the requirements of the law, and expand compliance with it. Mental health should be treated as part of a person's overall health, and we must ensure individuals living with mental health conditions can get the treatment they need. My Administration also continues to invest in science and research through the BRAIN initiative to enhance our understanding of the complexities of the human brain and to make it easier to diagnose and treat mental health disorders early. One of our most profound obligations as a Nation is to support the men and women in uniform who return home and continue fighting battles against mental illness. Last year, I signed the Clay Hunt SAV Act, which fills critical gaps in serving veterans with post-traumatic stress and other illnesses, increases peer support and outreach, and recruits more talented individuals to work on mental health issues at the Department of Veterans Affairs. This law will make it easier for veterans to get the care they need when they need it. All Americans, including service members, can get immediate assistance by calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK or by calling 1-800-662-HELP. During National Mental Health Awareness Month, we recognize those Americans who live with mental illness and substance use disorders, and we pledge solidarity with their families who need our support as well. Let us strive to ensure people living with mental health conditions know that they are not alone, that hope exists, and that the possibility of healing and thriving is real. Together, we can help everyone get the support they need to recover as they continue along the journey to get well. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 2016 as National Mental Health Awareness Month. I call upon citizens, government agencies, organizations, health care providers, and research institutions to raise mental health awareness and continue helping Americans live longer, healthier lives. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-eighth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand sixteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fortieth.  
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TriPolarTroy

Any Bipolar Cops or Law Enforcement Officers?

10 posts in this topic

Posted

I was just wondering if there were any other Law Enforcement Officers living and working with Bipolar Disorder.(Federal, Police Department, Sheriff Deputies, Corrections etc...) I work in Federal Law Enforcement and I have decided to keep my illness a secret due to the fear of losing my job. Only a few of my friends and family know about me being Bipolar. I would love to hear from anyone living a similar life.

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Posted

I am not a Law Enforcement Officer or anything.....but I DO agree with keeping your diagnosis to

yourself. The Job I had previously, I decided to be open and honest about it after I was diagnosed - BIG mistake! I was completely avoided by everyone, including our immediate Supervisor. Where I once had been included in even "general talk" amoungst my co-workers, I was completely (and very obviously) ignored and kept out of every conversation. NO one spoke to me anymore unless it was a work question and they HAD to.

It got so bad, that after 7 weeks of being treated this way, I quit my Job and vowed NEVER to tell another co-worker or boss about my diagnosis again.

It is so sad that in this day and age, people can be so ignorant.............

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Posted

I am not a Law Enforcement Officer or anything.....but I DO agree with keeping your diagnosis to

yourself. The Job I had previously, I decided to be open and honest about it after I was diagnosed - BIG mistake! I was completely avoided by everyone, including our immediate Supervisor. Where I once had been included in even "general talk" amoungst my co-workers, I was completely (and very obviously) ignored and kept out of every conversation. NO one spoke to me anymore unless it was a work question and they HAD to.

It got so bad, that after 7 weeks of being treated this way, I quit my Job and vowed NEVER to tell another co-worker or boss about my diagnosis again.

It is so sad that in this day and age, people can be so ignorant.............

Yes, I understand completely were you are coming from.....People can be so ignorant to the fact of mental illness....

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Posted

This is something I am curious about also. Before I was diagnosed, I was thinking about going to the police accademy. I would like to work for our local sheriff's department. But I am guessing it won't be possible now.

~BARB~

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Posted (edited)

TriPolarTroy,

I would think that it is better to not share your diagnosis with your work peers. It's not necessary and could bring a great deal of trouble to your work life.

Your medical situations are PRIVATE. You are not obligated to share the details with anyone, and I would be extremely cautious in doing so in a work environment.

As long as you and your treatment team feel that you are fit to do your job, I would keep doing it and not disclose your diagnosis. It's no one's business.

KA

Edited by KeepingAwake

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Posted

I would think, except for having to carry a piece of paper with you as to what meds you're on (in case of emergency)... this would be YOUR business, Troy....

Don't ever disclose TOO much information about yourself... unless it's interfering with your life.... keep it to yourself.

:bump:

((((Troy)))). Glad to see you posting!

Cat :hearts:

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Posted (edited)

I don't work in law enforcement per se... but I work in politics (provincial).

My diagnosis came out of the closet and it was for the better in my case. I have become the resident "expert" when dealing with constituents with mental health issues. I also am allowed a bit more time off in case something happens (admission into the hospital, or just to out of control for work).

One thing I have to be VERY careful about, is what I say. I plan to go further into politics, running for city councilor in 2010/2014 (depending on where I am in University, if I go to law school, etc). As unfortunate as it is, society is not ready to except mental illness, especially not in a figure of politics.

If you think it is more beneficial to keep it quiet, go with your gut instinct. Really, they can't fire you for mental illness as it is discriminatory (you could take it to the human rights tribunal) unless you are acting way out of control or missing to many days.

Edited by Sarah_gbp

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Posted

I want to thank everyone for their help and advise!

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Posted

Hi Troy

I am currently studying Justice in Australia so that I can join the Police service. I have not been diagnosed for fear that I will be rejected.. well actually I know I would. It is part of the requirements that they check your full medical history plus also running a psych exam of their own. This has been my dream for a long time so I have been to scared to get any medical help incase they found out. Once and if I am recruited I will get for help. I don't know if this is a smart choice but I am just not ready to give up my dream.

Do you work in a specialty field or do general policing duties? I would like to do Juvenile Aid which I know is extremely though to get into here and you have to undergo many psych evaluations. I would like to learn more about what you find most challenging, is it just the day to day having to get up and go or is there a particular aspect that makes it hard?

Anyway though I would say hi. Hope things get a bit easier for you.

d.

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Posted

I work as a Probation Officer in UK, I was diagnosed with Bipolar II on friday after 3 yrs of them being unsure which "box" to put me in. Ive had a few months off work and so am now wondering whether or not to disclose my illness- though Ii dont have to tell them anythign I dont want to.

I am also currently applying for the Police force- and there is a possibility I wont be able to join because of my Bipolar- even though its BP II and I dont ever get full blown mania or symptoms of psychosis.

Will have to wait an see...

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