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Could Someone Take Antidepressants Without A Diagnosis?


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10 replies to this topic

#1 vrichard

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 04:30 PM

Hi everyone,
I've never been to therapy or even talked to someone about feeling depressed for years. I've only recently joined this forum 2 days ago and began to do a little research on this. I'm not self-diagnosing or whatsoever, but I find that talking to a therapist is extremely intimidating and daunting (not to mention, expensive)

So my question would be, is it possible to obtain antidepressants from a pharmacy by just enquiring the pharmasist on which medication is most suitable?
Also, do you feel that medications do work?
Sorry if this sounds like a ridiculous question, but I would just like to clear that up.

Thank you for any replies.

#2 LaurynJcat

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 05:27 PM

Hello,

It's my understanding that you need a prescription at least from a GP (family doctor) rather than just the pharmacist.

Medications do work, but some people have to try a few to get one that works for them. Most doctors start out by prescribing an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) like prozac -- but it depends on the type of depression you have. You might want to do some of your own research online or here on DF- lots of info. Other common non-SSRI antidepressants include Wellbutrin and Effexor.

If I were you I might try cognitive-behavioral therapy first, if you're not currently in a severe depression. It's proven as effective as drug treatment. There are workbooks online if you can't afford a therapist. If you like send me a message and I will send you links to a CBT site online and some books.

Cheers,
Lauryn

Edited by LaurynJcat, 07 August 2011 - 05:28 PM.

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#3 Meko

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 05:41 PM

Hello vrichard,
I would strongly encourage you to get in to see a doctor, as they will be your biggest asset in your time of depression. If there is absolutely no way that you could see a doctor you could consult a pharmacist about possibly trying St. John's Wart or a vitamin therapy. There are some vitamins that help with depression, but the names of them escape me right now. You could likely research them on here or elsewhere on the internet. But, hands down, you are better off seeking medical advice from an actual doctor as it may still be a trial and error and what works for one person may not work for another.
Meko

#4 solarflare

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 04:24 PM

IT is definitely worthwhile talking to a GP in the least about the way you feel.

Take good care.

Imagine a giant asteroid on a direct collision course with Earth. That is the equivalent of what we face now [with climate change], yet we dither.



(James Hansen, Climate Scientist)



The sane people are unable to see the truth, even though they are convinced that they are the ones in touch with reality. It is only an insane man who is able to realize the degenerative nature of the ...... system.

#5 funchas

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 08:27 PM

If you want something without a prescription, you could try SAMe or St. John's Wort. They help improve mood. But you still need to be careful taking them. I think St. John's Wort can cause cataracts or something, so be careful with them.

I think you would just be better off asking a doctor for a prescription though. ;) The meds do help, esp. in those with severe depression. They're best used in addition to therapy though-- the meds simply make you feel better so you would be more receptive to what you can gain from therapy, which speeds up the process of recovery. It would be kind of hard to gain insight or learn something if you have no drive at all. However in those with mild to moderate depression, the therapy can be done without antidepressants; there's just not as much of a benefit for people in those cases and they sometimes do better without.

Good luck! It can be daunting to find one that works, but don't give up.




If you have a parent who is a psychiatrist you could be put on one without a diagnosis. That's what my dad did with me when he put me on Paxil for anxiety problems; technically I hadn't been diagnosed with anything then! But yeah, unusual circumstance there.

Edited by funchas, 08 August 2011 - 08:29 PM.


#6 moons

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 08:46 PM

Yes, it is very possible, but i strongly DO NOT RECOMMEND IT

it is both illegal and very very dangerous


go to your doctor and they will help you through your journey safely

good luck!


Hi everyone,
I've never been to therapy or even talked to someone about feeling depressed for years. I've only recently joined this forum 2 days ago and began to do a little research on this. I'm not self-diagnosing or whatsoever, but I find that talking to a therapist is extremely intimidating and daunting (not to mention, expensive)

So my question would be, is it possible to obtain antidepressants from a pharmacy by just enquiring the pharmasist on which medication is most suitable?
Also, do you feel that medications do work?
Sorry if this sounds like a ridiculous question, but I would just like to clear that up.

Thank you for any replies.





#7 vrichard

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 12:36 PM

Hi everyone, first of all- thank you for your replies.

Taking into account all of your replies, I am considering going to a GP for a prescription and I'm aware that I do have to explain to him about what I'm feeling. Since talking to a therapist would be daunting for me, its just the same case as talking to a GP.

I believe I've mentioned that I've never talked to someone about this before so I don't quite know how to start when I'm in a GP's office.

I have had these feelings for no apparent reason since I was 14 and it seems to have worsened in the past year. When I say 'no apparent reason' I mean that I have not been through any significant event (for example past childhood abuse/ death of someone close to me) that was sort of a pin-point for me.

So I hope you understand that I really have no idea how to start off the topic to a GP without feeling or sounding silly. I was hoping that some of you that have gone through this could give me some advice on this issue?

Again, so sorry if this is a ridiculous question! I am embarrassed to even have to ask this. :blush21:

#8 solarflare

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 01:16 PM

When I was younger I didnt understand why I was feeling sad. It has taken me a long time to see why I am depressed. I went to see many phsychiatrist who never really helped me. There have been some good councellors or phsychologists, but most of all it has been the research about depression and its causes which have empowered me the most. There are many good references in this forum.

I know what it feels like to be embarrased and in shame about having weakness. But you are not alone. Therse feelings will probably not go away if you dont work on them and it will get way easier once you start talking about it all. I remember feeling down in university because I was failing in some courses and broke down crying infront of my dad and girl friend. It freaked my dad out. He sent me to a doctor who told me to get more exercise and that was good for the brain...it is but it doesnt help determine why I was so down and felt inadequate. If only I had kept trying to understand myself more by talking to a good therapist or doctor earlier in life..but here I am.

Eventhough a GP is not a therapist, a good one can be very helpful in helping you get started on your path to healing. The medications dont change how you see yourself. They do take the edge off the emotions.

I hope you can get over feeling nervous regarding sharing your feelings with someone who can help you heal. I know we are suppose to be strong and not talk about our feelings of being not good enough, vulnerable or inadequate. This is a big problem in our society. GP dcotors deal with many people who suffer from feeling this way.

Good luck finding the strength to talk to a doctor....it will work out.

This forum is a great place to get support. If you feel up to it, try starting a new post and explain one small thing that you feel badly about regarding life..openup just a hole and let the light shine....you are good enough for yourself......it is just this messed up world that has convinced you otherwise...blessings

Edited by solarflare, 09 August 2011 - 01:17 PM.

Imagine a giant asteroid on a direct collision course with Earth. That is the equivalent of what we face now [with climate change], yet we dither.



(James Hansen, Climate Scientist)



The sane people are unable to see the truth, even though they are convinced that they are the ones in touch with reality. It is only an insane man who is able to realize the degenerative nature of the ...... system.

#9 solarflare

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 01:21 PM

Hi everyone, first of all- thank you for your replies.

Taking into account all of your replies, I am considering going to a GP for a prescription and I'm aware that I do have to explain to him about what I'm feeling. Since talking to a therapist would be daunting for me, its just the same case as talking to a GP.

I believe I've mentioned that I've never talked to someone about this before so I don't quite know how to start when I'm in a GP's office.

I have had these feelings for no apparent reason since I was 14 and it seems to have worsened in the past year. When I say 'no apparent reason' I mean that I have not been through any significant event (for example past childhood abuse/ death of someone close to me) that was sort of a pin-point for me.

So I hope you understand that I really have no idea how to start off the topic to a GP without feeling or sounding silly. I was hoping that some of you that have gone through this could give me some advice on this issue?

Again, so sorry if this is a ridiculous question! I am embarrassed to even have to ask this. :blush21:



not ridiculous at all

Edited by solarflare, 09 August 2011 - 01:22 PM.

Imagine a giant asteroid on a direct collision course with Earth. That is the equivalent of what we face now [with climate change], yet we dither.



(James Hansen, Climate Scientist)



The sane people are unable to see the truth, even though they are convinced that they are the ones in touch with reality. It is only an insane man who is able to realize the degenerative nature of the ...... system.

#10 IsoZeiss

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 10:54 PM

I have had these feelings for no apparent reason since I was 14 and it seems to have worsened in the past year. When I say 'no apparent reason' I mean that I have not been through any significant event (for example past childhood abuse/ death of someone close to me) that was sort of a pin-point for me.


I first went on prozac when I was about that age. It was prescribed by a GP because no one in my family has ever had to go through any kind of treatment for mental illness, so my parents sent me to my regular doctor. I don't really remember telling him how I felt or even talking much. He just asked me a few basic questions about my mood and daily habits. Then I was prescribed the AD without much further emotional/mental proding or questioning. So I doubt that a lot of other GP's will question a patient any more than that when they come in with depression.

I think a psychiatrist is a safer choice cos they know more about how these medications affect people than a GP. But if you really do feel uncomfortable about talking indepth about what you are dealing with, then going to a GP to get the meds would be better than going at it alone.
Humor can be a powerful tool.

The ability to make others laugh when you yourself are in pain shows there is hope. To have hope for yourself and for others to have hope in you.


"Yet why not say what happened?" - Robert Lowell

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#11 Avian86

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 10:36 AM

To the OP, if you have to ask that question, then you aren't able to self medicate properly nor safely, nor effectively; so I suggest you see a doctor.




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