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      National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2016   05/01/2016

      Proclamation 9433 of April 28, 2016 National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2016 A Proclamation Nearly 44 million American adults, and millions of children, experience mental health conditions each year, including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and post-traumatic stress. Although we have made progress expanding mental health coverage and elevating the conversation about mental health, too many people still do not get the help they need. Our Nation is founded on the belief that we must look out for one another—and whether it affects our family members, friends, co-workers, or those unknown to us—we do a service for each other when we reach out and help those struggling with mental health issues. This month, we renew our commitment to ridding our society of the stigma associated with mental illness, encourage those living with mental health conditions to get the help they need, and reaffirm our pledge to ensure those who need help have access to the support, acceptance, and resources they deserve. In the last 7 years, our country has made extraordinary progress in expanding mental health coverage for more people across America. The Affordable Care Act prohibits insurance companies from discriminating against people based on pre-existing conditions, requires coverage of mental health and substance use disorder services in individual and small group markets, and expands mental health and substance use disorder parity policies, which are estimated to help more than 60 million Americans. Nearly 15 million more Americans have gained Medicaid coverage since October 2013, significantly improving access to mental health care. And because of more than $100 million in funding from the Affordable Care Act, community health centers have expanded behavioral health services for nearly 900,000 people nationwide over the past 2 years. Still, far too few Americans experiencing mental illnesses do not receive the care and treatment they need. That is why my most recent Budget proposal includes a new half-billion dollar investment to improve access to mental health care, engage individuals with serious mental illness in care, and help ensure behavioral health care systems work for everyone. Our Nation has made strong advances in improving prevention, increasing early intervention, and expanding treatment of mental illnesses. Earlier this year, I established a Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Parity Task Force, which aims to ensure that coverage for mental health benefits is comparable to coverage for medical and surgical care, improve understanding of the requirements of the law, and expand compliance with it. Mental health should be treated as part of a person's overall health, and we must ensure individuals living with mental health conditions can get the treatment they need. My Administration also continues to invest in science and research through the BRAIN initiative to enhance our understanding of the complexities of the human brain and to make it easier to diagnose and treat mental health disorders early. One of our most profound obligations as a Nation is to support the men and women in uniform who return home and continue fighting battles against mental illness. Last year, I signed the Clay Hunt SAV Act, which fills critical gaps in serving veterans with post-traumatic stress and other illnesses, increases peer support and outreach, and recruits more talented individuals to work on mental health issues at the Department of Veterans Affairs. This law will make it easier for veterans to get the care they need when they need it. All Americans, including service members, can get immediate assistance by calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK or by calling 1-800-662-HELP. During National Mental Health Awareness Month, we recognize those Americans who live with mental illness and substance use disorders, and we pledge solidarity with their families who need our support as well. Let us strive to ensure people living with mental health conditions know that they are not alone, that hope exists, and that the possibility of healing and thriving is real. Together, we can help everyone get the support they need to recover as they continue along the journey to get well. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 2016 as National Mental Health Awareness Month. I call upon citizens, government agencies, organizations, health care providers, and research institutions to raise mental health awareness and continue helping Americans live longer, healthier lives. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-eighth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand sixteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fortieth.  
firelizardee

Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID)

81 posts in this topic

Posted

+---Topic: Understanding Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) started by Lindsay

Posted by: Lindsay on June 10 2003,08:20

What Is Dissociative Identity Disorder?

---------------------QUOTE-------------------

The growing recognition of psychiatric conditions resulting from traumatic influences is a significant mental health issue of the 1990s. Until recently considered rare and mysterious psychiatric curiosities, Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) (until very recently known as Multiple Personality Disorder - MPD) and other Dissociative Disorders (DD) are now understood to be fairly common effects of severe trauma in early childhood, most typically extreme, repeated physical, sexual, and/or emotional abuse.

In 1994, with the publication of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV, Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) was changed to Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), reflecting changes in professional understanding of the disorder, which resulted largely from increased empirical research of trauma-based dissociative disorders.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), widely accepted as a major mental illness affecting 9-10% of the general population, is closely related to Dissociative Identity Disorder (MPD) and other Dissociative Disorders (DD). In fact, as many as 80-100% of people diagnosed with DID (MPD) also have a secondary diagnosis of PTSD. The personal and societal cost of trauma disorders [including DID (MPD), DD, and PTSD] is extremely high. For example, recent research suggests the risk of suicide attempts among people with trauma disorders may be even higher than among people who have major depression. In addition, there is evidence that people with trauma disorders have higher rates of alcoholism, chronic medical illnesses, and abusiveness in succeeding generations.

What Is Dissociation?

Dissociation is a mental process which produces a lack of connection in a person's thoughts, memories, feelings, actions, or sense of identity. During the period of time when a person is dissociating, certain information is not associated with other information as it normally would be. For example, during a traumatic experience, a person may dissociate the memory of the place and circumstances of the trauma from his ongoing memory, resulting in a temporary mental escape from the fear and pain of the trauma and, in some cases, a memory gap surrounding the experience. Because this process can produce changes in memory, people who frequently dissociate often find their senses of personal history and identity are affected.

Most clinicians believe that dissociation exists on a continuum of severity. This continuum reflects a wide range of experiences and/or symptoms. At one end are mild dissociative experiences common to most people, such as daydreaming, highway hypnosis, or "getting lost" in a book or movie, all of which involve "losing touch" with conscious awareness of one's immediate surroundings. At the other extreme is complex, chronic dissociation, such as in cases of Dissociative Identity Disorder (MPD) and other Dissociative Disorders, which may result in serious impairment or inability to function. Some people with DID(MPD)/DD can hold highly responsible jobs, contributing to society in a variety of professions, the arts, and public service. To co-workers, neighbors, and others with whom they interact daily, they apparently function normally.

There is a great deal of overlap of symptoms and experiences among the various Dissociative Disorders, including DID (MPD). For the sake of clarity, this brochure will refer to DID(MPD)/DD as a collective term. Individuals should seek help from qualified mental health providers to answer questions about their own particular circumstances and diagnoses.

How Does DID(MPD)/DD Develop?

When faced with overwhelmingly traumatic situations from which there is no physical escape, a child may resort to "going away" in his or her head. This ability is typically used by children as an extremely effective defense against acute physical and emotional pain, or anxious anticipation of that pain. By this dissociative process, thoughts, feelings, memories, and perceptions of the traumatic experiences can be separated off psychologically, allowing the child to function as if the trauma had not occurred.

DID(MPD)/DD is often referred to as a highly creative survival technique, because it allows individuals enduring "hopeless" circumstances to preserve some areas of healthy functioning. Over time, however, for a child who has been repeatedly physically and sexually assaulted, defensive dissociation becomes reinforced and conditioned. Because the dissociative escape is so effective, children who are very practiced at it may automatically use it whenever they feel threatened or anxious -- even if the anxiety-producing situation is not abusive.

Often, even after the traumatic circumstances are long past, the left-over pattern of defensive dissociation remains. Chronic defensive dissociation may lead to serious dysfunction in work, social, and daily activities. Repeated dissociation may result in a series of separate entities, or mental states, which may eventually take on identities of their own. These entities may become the internal "personality states," of a DID(MPD) system. Changing between these states of consciousness is described as "switching."

What Are The Symptoms Of DID(MPD)/DD?

People with DID(MPD) may experience any of the following: depression, mood swings, suicidal tendencies, sleep disorders (insomnia, night terrors, and sleep walking), panic attacks and phobias (flashbacks, reactions to stimuli or "triggers"), alcohol and drug abuse, compulsions and rituals, psychotic-like symptoms (including auditory and visual hallucinations), and eating disorders. In addition, individuals with DID(MPD)/DD can experience headaches, amnesias, time loss, trances, and "out of body experiences." Some people with DID(MPD)/DD have a tendency toward self-persecution, self-sabotage, and even violence (both self-inflicted and outwardly directed).

Who Gets DID(MPD)/DD?

The vast majority (as many as 98 to 99%) of individuals who develop DID(MPD)/DD have documented histories of repetitive, overwhelming, and often life-threatening trauma at a sensitive developmental stage of childhood (usually before the age of nine), and they may possess an inherited biological predisposition for dissociation. In our culture the most frequent precursor to DID(MPD)/DD is extreme physical, emotional, and sexual abuse in childhood, but survivors of other kinds of trauma in childhood (such as natural disasters, invasive medical procedures, war, and torture) have also reacted by developing DID(MPD)/DD.

Current research shows that DID(MPD) may affect 1% of the general population and perhaps as many as 5-20% of people in psychiatric hospitals, many of whom have received other diagnoses. The incidence rates are even higher among sexual abuse survivors and individuals with chemical dependencies. These statistics put DID(MPD)/DD in the same category as schizophrenia, depression, and anxiety, as one of the four major mental health problems today.

Most current literature shows that DID(MPD)/DD is recognized primarily among females. The latest research, however, indicates that the disorders may be equally prevalent (but less frequently diagnosed) among the male population. Men with DID(MPD)/DD are most likely to be in treatment for other mental illnesses, for drug and alcohol abuse, or incarcerated.

Why Are Dissociative Disorders Often Misdiagnosed?

DID(MPD)/DD survivors often spend years living with misdiagnoses, consequently floundering within the mental health system. They change from therapist to therapist and from medication to medication, getting treatment for symptoms but making little or no actual progress. Research has documented that on average, people with DID(MPD)/DD have spent seven years in the mental health system prior to accurate diagnosis.

This is common, because the list of symptoms that cause a person with DID(MPD)/DD to seek treatment is very similar to those of many other psychiatric diagnoses. In fact, many people who are diagnosed with DID(MPD)/DD also have secondary diagnoses of depression, anxiety, or panic disorders.

Do People Actually Have Multiple Personalities?

Yes, and no. One of the reasons for the decision by the psychiatric community to change the disorder's name from Multiple Personality Disorder to Dissociative Identity Disorder is that "multiple personalities" is somewhat of a misleading term. A person diagnosed with DID(MPD) has within her two or more entities, or personality states, each with its own independent way of relating, perceiving, thinking and remembering about herself and her life. If two or more of these entities take control of the person's behavior at a given time (what do you mean by a given time?), a diagnosis of MPD can be made. These entities previously were often called "personalities," even though the term did not accurately reflect the common definition of the word as the total aspect of our psychological makeup. Other terms often used by therapists and survivors to describe these entities are: "alternate personalities", "alters," "parts," "states of consciousness," "ego states," and "identities." It is important to keep in mind that although these alternate personality states may appear to be very different, they are all manifestations of a single person.

Can DID(MPD)/DD Be Cured?

Yes. Dissociative disorders are highly responsive to individual psychotherapy, or "talk therapy," as well as to a range of other treatment modalities, including medications, hypnotherapy, and adjunctive therapies such as art or movement therapy. In fact, among comparably severe psychiatric disorders, DID(MPD) may be the condition that carries the best prognosis, if proper treatment is undertaken and completed. The course of treatment is long-term, intensive, and invariably painful, as it generally involves remembering and reclaiming the dissociated traumatic experiences. Nevertheless, individuals with DID(MPD)/DD have been successfully treated by therapists of all professional backgrounds working in a variety of settings.

Where Can I Get More Information?

The Sidran Foundation is a publicly-supported, non-profit organization devoted to advocacy, education, and research on behalf of people with psychiatric disabilities. The foundation is particularly interested in providing support and advocating empowerment for people who have survived psychological trauma, and has developed resources in this area. The Sidran Foundation Bookshelf is a mail-order book service providing annotated catalogs and home-delivery of books, audio and video tapes, and informational materials of particular interest to DID(MPD)/DD survivors, their supportive family and friends, and their therapists. The Sidran Press is publisher of the highly acclaimed Multiple Personality Disorder From the Inside Out, a collection of writings about living with MPD by 146 survivors and their significant others. In addition, Sidran has compiled lists of MPD/DD support and treatment resources and conducts educational workshops.

---------------------QUOTE-------------------

Trauma and Dissociation

Sidran Site for DID

Suite 101 DID

Posted by: Lynn on Aug. 07 2003,13:48

Hi ange,

Each of my alters hand writing varies and none of thier writing looks like mine. This is common with DID. Sorry I took so long to post back to you hon. Hadnt been to "with" it the last couple weeks. Doing better now though. Hope this helps.

Lynnie

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Posted

As far as I know these are all Dissociative Disorders and are relative to PTSD, borderline schizo and BPD. Admin, please feel free to edit if this is incorrect please? Thanks. :hearts:

Conversion Disorder-The symptoms of conversion disorder involve the loss of one or more bodily functions. These may include blindness, paralysis or the inability to speak. The loss of physical function is involuntary and diagnostic testing does not show a physical cause for the dysfunction.

Psychogenic Fugue

Psychogenic Fugue - dissociative disorder in which a person forgets who they are and leaves home to creates a new life; during the fugue there is no memory of the former life; after recovering there is no memory for events during the dissociative state.

Depersonalisation Disorder - emotional dissociative disorder in which there is loss of contact with your own personal reality accompanied by feelings of unreality and strangeness.

Standardized definition.

Dissociative Disorder - dissociation so severe that the usually

integrated functions of consciousness and perception of self break down.

A dissociative disorder is a defense mechanism in which one's identity, memories, ideas, feelings, or perceptions are separated from conscious awareness. They can't be recalled or experienced voluntarily. The following are considered types of dissociative disorders:

Dissociative amnesia- http://www.psychnet-uk.com/dsm_iv/dissociative_amnesia.htm

Dissociative fugue-

http://www.behavenet.com/capsules/disorders/disfugue.htm

Dissociative stupor- NOS- Loss of consciousness, stupor, or coma not attributable to a general medical condition.

Trance and possession disorders- definition can be found here along with a little extra on DD. http://www.mosaicminds.org/rroom/diag_crit.html

Dissociative motor disorders-the paralysis of voluntary muscles, motor tics and disorders of gait.

Dissociative convulsions- (**Forum Admin Note** Dissociative convulsions is newly referred to as Psychogenic NES and below is the website with a very complete description).

Some NES have a psychological cause and are called

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Posted

good info Epic.  I'll pin this topic.

At times I feel like a Russian Doll, the 'me' is one of the inner dolls and I feel separated from the outside.  Don't know if thats DD but might be related.  I certainly know that at times, when I'm going through a real upsetting time I have difficulty remembering what I say.

Anyway....

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Posted

I see it kind of like tht myself, I sent you a PM which is fairly personal, rather not post it but it might shed some light but it sounds like a defense mechanism to me from what little I have learned so far...

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Posted

My therapist recently told me that I am dissociative but didn't specify type.  I believe I would fall under the Depersonalization category.  I can definitely relate to the feeling crazy because of it.

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Posted

I would ask my therapist next time I went in the specific type and try and form a plan of attack D. I'm sorry you have it, wish none of us had to go through the things we're going through.

Talking with my therapist seems to help me a lot though, she can point out things I miss and hopefully yours will too.

God Bless and good fortune.

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Posted

I dissociate. Upon reading all the excellent information I recognize in myself dissociative anesthesia and sensory loss, and dissociative amnesia.

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Posted

Jaded,

Hi!

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Posted

Epic,

Thanks for your understanding and very kind words. I am sorry that you have to deal with it too. I hope it comes back but I'm afraid I lost it forever. Broken trust is a very difficult thing for me to recover. Trust is essential to my healing. It's almost harder to have have felt it and lost it than to have never felt it at all. :(

I wish you much luck in your journey toward healing and pray you will fully recover your good feelings again. Thank you for your encouragement. I will try to be optimistic about regaining that which was lost. I know the mind has so much to do with our responses. Unfortunately things are out of my control.

I appreciate you.

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Posted

Jaded,

Thank you too for the kind words!

You know to me, trust is intangible unfortunately it always will be, if I can't see something or be able to give it definition by my senses then I have a hard time accepting it as truth. It took me years just to be able to trust in God but the thing is, is that I got to that Point, it was painful at times and scary at other times but I at least made it to the summit of that particular

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Posted

[

Dissociative Identity Disorder

(formerly Multiple Personality Disorder)

Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), previously referred to as multiple personality disorder (MPD), is a dissociative disorder involving a disturbance of identity in which two or more separate and distinct personality states (or identities) control the individual's behavior at different times. When under the control of one identity, the person is usually unable to remember some of the events that occurred while other personalities were in control. The different identities, referred to as alters, may exhibit differences in speech, mannerisms, attitudes, thoughts, and gender orientation. The alters may even differ in "physical" properties such as allergies, right-or-left handedness, or the need for eyeglass prescriptions. These differences between alters are often quite striking.

cont...

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Posted

1. Previously known as multiple personality disorder, dissociative identity disorder (DID) is a dissociative disorder in which two or more distinct identities take control of a patient

Saliacquigoug likes this

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Posted

Thanks Lindsay for this write up. It is very informative and right on the money.

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Posted

DD NOS, me....(unofficial) therapist sees 2 main parts...and one separate personality...I'm aware of more...

I don't lose time...am familiar with 'going away'.... can def relate to the 'russian dolls' description.....

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Posted

DD NOS, me....(unofficial) therapist sees 2 main parts...and one separate personality...I'm aware of more...

I don't lose time...am familiar with 'going away'.... can def relate to the 'russian dolls' description.....

I lose time but am not sure what it's related to because there's so much wrong with me. The blackouts can last 10 secs to maybe 10 minutes. It's really scary when it happens as I am driving.

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Posted

Epic have you told your doc about the blackouts?

Eileen

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Posted

Epic have you told your doc about the blackouts?

Eileen

Hi Eileen, I'm sorry it took so long to reply...I've been "trying" to sleep for days. How are you these days? I'm doing some better but the blackouts still continue. =(

I've told them about the blackouts since day 1 and that is the area they concentrate on the most. It's not a seizure we found out but we're still not sure what causes it except perhaps stress and lack of sleep. I saw my T cringe when I told her I had bought a motorbike and gotten my permit to ride, so it must be worse than I imagine, I'm thinking about just selling the thing for a profit.

I'm thinking I am dissociating when they happen, almost everytime when I am driving and I have one, I'll be staring at my feet which scares the living poo outta me. It only seems to happen in certain places though "most" of the time.

Thank you for your concern Eileen.

Peace&Love

Epic

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Posted

Dissociative convulsions-

Epic,

Thank you for the information, I suffer from epilepsy also but I was able to take all my test results to the neurologist and I was able to suggest to him that my new seizures were actulally Dissociative Convulsions. The neurologist concurred and thanks to the information found here I was able to keep from undergoing extensive testing.

I myself have 4 seperate personalities in my head that occasionally take me over. Two are evil and two are nice. Good luck with yours.

Thank You.

Slim

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Posted

Dissociative convulsions-

Epic,

Thank you for the information, I suffer from epilepsy also but I was able to take all my test results to the neurologist and I was able to suggest to him that my new seizures were actulally Dissociative Convulsions. The neurologist concurred and thanks to the information found here I was able to keep from undergoing extensive testing.

I myself have 4 seperate personalities in my head that occasionally take me over. Two are evil and two are nice. Good luck with yours.

Thank You.

Slim

Slim,

I am so glad to hear that this information was able to help you and save you the expense and misery of more testing. I had wondered how you were doing. I hope all is going well for you and continues to get better day by day.

Peace&Love

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Posted

WOW thanks for all this information!!! Just yesterday I told my therapist about my feelings of living outside of my body. She said I am dissociating. I am dissociative probably 95% of the time. I fall heavily into the depersonalization category.

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Posted

WOW thanks for all this information!!! Just yesterday I told my therapist about my feelings of living outside of my body. She said I am dissociating. I am dissociative probably 95% of the time. I fall heavily into the depersonalization category.

I'm glad this thread was of benefit to you! It always makes me feel good to know the information provided by fire and I help people!

I wish I had a T (therapist) tht would be so helpful as to even begin to tell me a lot of things I'd like to know. It's partially my fault, I shoud be keeping notes of things to ask her but I loss the notes most of the time or even my notepad. I'd suggest (if you can keep up with it) a small notepad and write down things tht you would like to discuss with your T. I know half the time I get off into a tangent as soon as I walk in about something other than what I was thinking about, the notebook makes it a lot easier (for me) to focus at least.

You know with therapy most people can come to grips with dissocative disorders from what I have read and seen on TV but then add meds on top of it and things can start looking pretty bright in just a short time...sometimes.

I hope you can get it under control as I know how it is, I'd slip off into my mind amongst my thoughts, it's always been safe there for me. Which is what most dissociative disorders boil down to. Feeling safe. Refuge. I remember once I sat and thought for 2 days straight about quantum theory, in the same place, didn't eat nor did I sleep...it's a wonder I didn't dehydrate!

For encouragement, assuming you've just been diagnosed as you mentioned, my T told me tht my dissociation was so bad she didn't know how I was managing to survive when I first came to them. She actually thought I was on the brink so to speak she claims. In less than 2 years I've become quite extroverted although with a personality disorder tht's not always a good thing :hearts:

I still manage to slip off into my thoughts when I get stressed and am alone. Brooding my mother used to call it. I called it home. I miss it sometimes but who wants to go around in life this one time living like I was? Nooot me. I wasted almost 35 years in nothing but deep thought and missed the scenery along the dog gone way. =( So read all you can about it, talk with Fire as well about it and also as much as possible talk about possible solutions with your T and psych.

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Posted

Epic,

I am actively working on the whole dissociation thing. I am having reiki treatments done by a reiki master in the weeks I don't see my therapist. She is teaching me how to be present in my body.

The spaced out separated feelings was on my list to talk to my therapist about this last session. I was having trouble coming up with words to explain what I was feeling, but my reiki person was able to help me get the words. My therapist is THRILLED that I am doing the reiki, she thinks it will greatly aide in my recovery. Having this information helped me out when I had my annual job review on Friday. The things that were mentioned that I need to work on were all things which are caused by dissociation. I did tell my supervisor and my department RN that I am having a lot of personal problems and I am in therapy. They were very supportive and both offered to let me talk and vent when I need to.

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Posted

Epic,

I can't tell you how much your replies help me. Sometimes I feel like I am the only one with this disorder. I now have 5 personalities and am aware of them as they badger me or discuss things. The meds help quiet them but they are very expensive and we are not going to be able to afford them for long. Middle income is a bad place to be. Too rich for assistance and too poor to be rich. That sent me on a whole suicidal trek yesterday. It doesn't help that I am easily depressed and a self- harmer since I take things out on myself. You would think that after 45 years I would learn to stop taking things out on myself. Blame is a wonderful thing. I can sit and stew about the causes of things for hours. Put a tattoo machine in my hand and my one Persona ethyl has a grand time. (She sings horribly by the way.) It helps me so much to know I am not alone. The dissociative disorder is wierd if for lack of any other terms. I wish I could help my family understand. They have started understanding the voices in my head but the whole someone else controling the arms thing and controling my body they have not come to grips with yet. My wife and I just had a fight last night because she just wants to yell get over it. I wish it were that easy.

I hope everyone with dissociation knows they are not alone and I thank you for your help.

Thanks

Slim

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Posted (edited)

Just me and Slim,

God I hate Kentucky sometimes, no reiki, no temples, nothing but T's and pdocs, well, we do have massage therapists. I also forgot to mention NLP practioners also. There's an area you and Slim both could look into, NLP neuro linguistic programming...it takes PTSD I've read and can reduce it to near nothing. PTSD and dissociation are closely tied together in a lot of cases, not all but a lot of them. It's your mind's way of saying I'm checking outta here for a while, while I let my body go on auto-pilot or go to a different personality. If a person can use NLP to reduce the amt. of PTSD then the dissociation should reduce as well according to test studies I have read. I am fixing to give NLP a try, I feel I have the couarge now to try it. Hopefully within the next 2 weeks I'll have some concrete proof for you guys if she can fit me in. Actually it'll probably take a few mths to notice any changes but I'm patient after 35 years of hell.

Slim,

There are medical programs tht allow you to buy prescriptions where I live for 5 $ if you have your pdoc write one for you, at least in Ky they do. It works like this, the drug companies dig as far as they can into everyone's pants pockets and at the end of the year they need tax write offs so they came up with the 5 $ program for tht purpose. Maybe you could discuss tht with your doc. I'm not so sure you'll qualify if you're middle income but it's worth asking about. I lived on less than 5k a year for 10 years so I'm not sure if it was the poverty level I lived under tht controlled the situation or if the doc was just trying to help me out but no matter, I'd recommend at the least asking about it. You have nothing to lose by asking. I do know if it weren't for this program I'd not be able to eat with all the meds I have to buy.

I can't say I have muliple personalities but I can say I have a side of me tht loses control and I blackout during which time I turn into hell in a hotrod. It's always triggers for me. A gesture, a tone of voice, a certain facial pattern, etc can send me into a rage tht I have absolutely no control over. I've almost killed 3 people in the last 10 years due to this crappola...so I've become a hermit. That's hopefully where the NLP will come into play...if she can dig down into my noodle far enough maybe she can pull it up and see "why" it triggers me and then half the battle will be won. Then we can work on the rest of the traumas, I'm thinking this may take a while but from what I have read it works faster than one would imagine, even faster than normal therapy.

Edited by Epic

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