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Jaw Clenching -TENS machine


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#1 Viviane

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 10:37 AM

Well I bought the TENS machine
got it set up earlier and decided I was in SO much pain across my shoulders that I would set it at the neck shoulder setting and on thE MOST intense setting due to the pain and the desperation I was feeling

well that was a mistake its like being stabbed with a pointy stick - so I reset it to the minimum setting

it has helped a little perhaps I should use it more often to
a) get used to the feeling
b) get rid of the pain as I am in LESS pain now but it hasnt gone altogether

would I recomend one

lets just say I need a few more days to decide but for now I am in slightly less pain than I was

#2 Jkm

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 12:13 PM

I hope that you have a good outcome with this. I can't imagine having it set at the highest setting! I know that had to be very painful. :hearts:
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I have GAD. I worry about everything, lol!

#3 Viviane

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 12:39 PM

I can't imagine having it set at the highest setting! I know that had to be very painful. :hearts:



Well I was desperate after being in this pain for the last 6 weeks I really did want to be rid of it ONCE can for all
well I gave it an hour and tried it again this time I started on minimum setting the put it up during the 15 min treatment (but only to three - it goes to 8)
and THE PAIN WAS GONE really and truely it was gone

the sad thing was it was back within the hour BUT after two treatments I have had one hour of relief - you cant believe how wonderful that was - I intend to use it as I go to bed after a nice soak in the bath I will put it on and use it for the 15 mins while I read - I am really hoping I can then get to sleep easily and maybe just maybe wake with no pain

if I have to use this two to three times a day from now on it does mean I can stay on Cipralex (Lexapro) which will be so good as it really really does work for my depression

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 12:45 PM

The TENS unit really does help. I have one and it's a great help to my jaws, neck, shoulders, and back. I recommend it... I really do. I've been through major reconstructive surgery to reconstruct my jaws due to TMJoint dysfunction and in the end, it's a lifesaver for aching muscles when nothing else will do.... You don't want to rely on hydrocodone... been there, done that... it just makes it worse in the long run...

good luck with this.

((((((V))))))

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#5 comebackkid

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 06:19 PM

I don't know what a TENS machine is, but I have constant bruxism (jaw-clenching). I see a chiropractor for it - he fixes my spine, neck, jaw, feet and sometimes my wrists. I have a powerful Norwegian jaw - like a vise - but I've never needed surgery, just a bite-splint. My chiro works wonders on me. BTW, I can't take painkillers because I had kidney failure last year due to NSAIDs and can't take them ever again (you know, ibuprofen, aleve, aspirin). I can take tylenol but that's associated with liver failure. I don't want any more failed organs. I try to deal with pain more naturally, like with strong coffee. Or a good chiropractor.

Good luck, everybody.

#6 Jkm

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 09:52 PM

Could you explain what happened to your kidney? My right kidney shrunk and my doc dais it's not due to longterm use of ibuprofen. It still works, but for how long? What about my left one!

A TENS unit is like the thing the girls with your doc puts on your back that sends current into your muscles to get them to relax. A portable TENS unit runs on batteries and you can even wear this at work if you have pain. I saw an advertisement on television in the wee hours of the morning for one about two weeks ago. I was very surprized!
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I have GAD. I worry about everything, lol!

#7 Viviane

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Posted 27 March 2006 - 12:44 PM

Yes you are right I wore mine in work today

I had the unit in a zip up pocket and th wires under my clothes attatched to the electrodes and I just left it on at school all day
a couple of times today I set it going (at break and lunch times) and I feel so much better I just wish I had thought of this before
I will still be seeing my doctor to see what she thinks on Thursday but for now I know I can cope

I am not totally pain free but I think given a few days and me getting the timing and settings right I can live fairly pain free for several hours a day - life today is wonderful :)

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Posted 27 March 2006 - 02:20 PM

I. I try to deal with pain more naturally, like with strong coffee.



Just so you know..... Caffeine is a STIMULANT! Stimulants are the WRONG things to use in combatting bruxism! Caffeine CAUSES you to clench your TEETH! :bump: Stimulants of all kinds, will cause you to clench and re-clench your teeth! Cutting out all caffeine, including, coffee, tea, chocolate, meds like Adderall, Wellbutrin, Ritalin, and other stimulating meds will help in the battle of the BRUX! :shocked: If you want to STOP the clenching, stop it where it starts! The med that they used to combat clenching when I was going through splint therapy was Buspirone (Buspar) in low doses. This med would relax my jaw and allow my muscles to NOT contract (which anxiety and caffeine was causing the exact opposite to happen). Splints (hard splints, NOT soft splints) are effective because they allow your teeth a "time out" from fighting against each other for a proper fit.

In my case, my right side of my face had stopped growing at the growth plate (because of an injury at the age of 11) and the only place my teeth now fit together (even though I had been through braces once as a teen), was at the rear molars of 1 and 31,(*teeth are numbered starting at the upper right and going around to the lower right). This caused severe debilitating headaches and neck and shoulder aches and also resulted in a skeletal deformaty that needed surgical intervention... It took four surgeries to fix the problem.... A LaForte One Osteotomy with a surgical assisted palatal split (9mm bone block for palate), Two Sagittal Splits (done at separate times for open bites with rigid fixation), and a sub-condylar osteotomy with rigid fixation. (I was a dental assistant at the time! :) ) So I went through the ringer.... Hundreds of thousands of dollars later, I can say anything with a straight face! :hearts: and I have what my doctor calls a "Glass jaw" with "Crossed wires" LOL! But there's no more pain!

During my pre-surgical waiting period... I used a TENS UNIT... and indeed, occasional still do, as I own a nifty-handy-dandy unit now... and I find it priceless...

But cutting out the pre-cursors that CAUSE the pain in the first place is KEY... no caffeine... low stress situations..., no stimulants... no diet pills.... etc... use a splint if you need one... low stress job (tee hee), etc...

Good luck!

sorry for hijacking... just wanted to share my experience in case it helps someone... There REALLY IS hope!
Cat

#9 Viviane

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Posted 27 March 2006 - 02:57 PM

Cat I agree there is hope and we all need to share as much knowledge as we can

less stressful job (yeah right-I am supposed to do partime to help my health) well the colleague I am covering for is still off work this is now the 4th week of 'flu something tells me he doesnt have flu but if he has a note from the doctor to say he has his employers cant do anything at this stage to dismiss him

I think it is stress/anxiety/depression related but why he cant be honest about it I dont know

on Friday the schools here break for two weeks for easter - dont know if he will be back before then if he does I bet its friday just to see if the kids bring in chocolate eggs :)

#10 comebackkid

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Posted 27 March 2006 - 07:27 PM

Just so you know..... Caffeine is a STIMULANT! Stimulants are the WRONG things to use in combatting bruxism! Caffeine CAUSES you to clench your TEETH! :bump: Stimulants of all kinds, will cause you to clench and re-clench your teeth! Cutting out all caffeine, including, coffee, tea, chocolate, meds like Adderall, Wellbutrin, Ritalin, and other stimulating meds will help in the battle of the BRUX! :shocked: If you want to STOP the clenching, stop it where it starts! The med that they used to combat clenching when I was going through splint therapy was Buspirone (Buspar) in low doses. This med would relax my jaw and allow my muscles to NOT contract (which anxiety and caffeine was causing the exact opposite to happen). Splints (hard splints, NOT soft splints) are effective because they allow your teeth a "time out" from fighting against each other for a proper fit.


Well, that may work for you, but for me caffeine is an effective upper and anti-depressant in small doses, as well as an analgesic. It's also not linked to organ failure, as are NSAIDs and tylenol, and it's much safer than cortisone drugs. I use a soft splint because it's easier on my teeth and jaw than a hard splint. There's another kind of splint that fits over your front teeth but it's $$$$ and people tend to spit them out in their sleep. And regular chiropractic treatments help me avoid a lot of pain before it starts. I tried Buspar but it wasn't strong enough. I take Lexapro and Clonazepam (anti-anxiety).

Different things work for different people! :hearts:

#11 Guest_I am Cat_*

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 12:26 AM

I won't argue with you... period. Clonazepam works the same way that Buspar works, only it's MUCH stronger. MUCH stronger... it makes me drive into curbs. You're right... different things for different people. But Caffeine... not matter HOW you slice it, IS a stimulant, and has NEVER been proven as an AD. Period.

I'm glad that your way works for you. I truly am, but I know that for most people, it wouldn't. I hope that people will do their research and find ways that work for THEM. Of course, there's Bruxism, and there's TMJ Disorders... and there's a world of different treatments in between for the different severities.

Thank goodness we all have choices and options, right?

#12 Jkm

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 08:42 AM

Oh boy! I know from experience and having had a caffine addiction, and I mean drinking it from a cup or a can; not pills, that caffine can get your heart in a tizzy. I had to go on a beta-blocker to get mine to stop beating 120-140 Beats Per Minute, and felt like my chest was being compressed on the inside. Not comfortable and very scarey. All this from 7-8 cups/cans of coffee/soda that I drank at work/home to give me energy to get rhough the workday and taking care of three tiny children. Then the lack of sleep it produced-- it eventually sent me back to the doc with anxiety so bad that I needed to be medicated to be able to sleep.

My advice is to create an awareness; not to tell anyone how to live their caffine life. I still drink coffee, 50/50 and drink decaffinated Pepsi. (Oh, the small thing in life to be grateful for!) :hearts: I don't think I could wake up very well without it. I'm an American, after all, and I like my coffee!! :shocked:

Anyhow, back to the TENS discussion.

Viviane,

I'm glad that you are getting relief from all the neck and shoulder pain.

I also have TMJ. No discussion, thought. I've had it for years and if I get stressed out, here comes the headaches. I have one of those pliable neck sraps that I keep in my freezer. You can get them anywhere that does physical therapy. Feels like heaven when I need it.

Jackie :bump:
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I have GAD. I worry about everything, lol!

#13 Viviane

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 10:21 AM

Thanks for that Jackie
I will try to get one - I bet we can get them here in the UK

well I have used the TENS machine 3 times today at school (once less than yesterday) and I have NO pain at all - I can hardly beleive this its so wonderful

I will be using it about 9.45 then going to have a nice warm soak in the bath - I am hoping tomorrow that I wont need it at all - that really will be something

Off to the docs on Thursday and will then discuss options - one might be to reduce the dose the other to change meds but to be honest as I keep saying the Lex is so very very good for the depression I really dont want to change unless I have too:)

#14 Lindsay

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 10:31 AM

Viviane,

I just thought, you may want to read this article that I posted a few weeks ago about coffee. Here's the scoop!

I hope it helps "calm" you about the effects or put it in the proper perspective as everyone is different.
and the best of luck with your Doctors appt and your tens unit! :hearts:



Coffee: The New Health Food?

Posted Image

Plenty of health benefits are brewing in America's beloved beverage.
By Sid Kirchheimer
WebMD Feature Reviewed By Michael Smith, MD

Want a drug that could lower your risk of diabetes, Parkinson's disease, and colon cancer? That could lift your mood and treat headaches? That could lower your risk of cavities?

If it sounds too good to be true, think again.

Coffee, the much maligned but undoubtedly beloved beverage, just made headlines for possibly cutting the risk of the latest disease epidemic, type 2 diabetes. And the real news seems to be that the more you drink, the better.

Reducing Disease Risk

After analyzing data on 126,000 people for as long as 18 years, Harvard researchers calculate that compared with not partaking in America's favorite morning drink, downing one to three cups of caffeinated coffee daily can reduce diabetes risk by single digits. But having six cups or more each day slashed men's risk by 54% and women's by 30% over java avoiders.

Though the scientists give the customary "more research is needed" before they recommend you do overtime at Starbuck's to specifically prevent diabetes, their findings are very similar to those in a less-publicized Dutch study. And perhaps more importantly, it's the latest of hundreds of studies suggesting that coffee may be something of a health food -- especially in higher amounts.

In recent decades, some 19,000 studies have been done examining coffee's impact on health. And for the most part, their results are as pleasing as a gulp of freshly brewed Breakfast Blend for the 108 million Americans who routinely enjoy this traditionally morning -- and increasingly daylong -- ritual. In practical terms, regular coffee drinkers include the majority of U.S. adults and a growing number of children.

"Overall, the research shows that coffee is far more healthful than it is harmful," says Tomas DePaulis, PhD, research scientist at Vanderbilt University's Institute for Coffee Studies, which conducts its own medical research and tracks coffee studies from around the world. "For most people, very little bad comes from drinking it, but a lot of good."

Consider this: At least six studies indicate that people who drink coffee on a regular basis are up to 80% less likely to develop Parkinson's, with three showing the more they drink, the lower the risk. Other research shows that compared to not drinking coffee, at least two cups daily can translate to a 25% reduced risk of colon cancer, an 80% drop in liver cirrhosis risk, and nearly half the risk of gallstones.

Coffee even offsets some of the damage caused by other vices, some research indicates. "People who smoke and are heavy drinkers have less heart disease and liver damage when they regularly consume large amounts of coffee compared to those who don't," says DePaulis.

There's also some evidence that coffee may help manage asthma and even control attacks when medication is unavailable, stop a headache, boost mood, and even prevent cavities.

The Benefits of Caffeine

Is it the caffeine? The oodles of antioxidants in coffee beans, some of which become especially potent during the roasting process? Even other mysterious properties that warrant this intensive study?

Actually, yes.

Some of coffee's reported benefits are a direct result of its higher caffeine content: An eight ounce cup of drip-brewed coffee contains about 85 mg -- about three and a half times more than the same serving of tea or cola or one ounce of chocolate.

"The evidence is very strong that regular coffee consumption reduces risk of Parkinson's disease and for that, it's directly related to caffeine," DePaulis tells WebMD. "In fact, Parkinson's drugs are now being developed that contain a derivative of caffeine based on this evidence."

Caffeine is also what helps in treating asthma and headaches. Though not widely publicized, a single dose of pain reliever such as Anacin or Excedrin contains up to 120 milligrams -- what's in a hefty mug o' Joe.

Boost to Athleticism

It's also caffeine -- and not coffee, per se -- that makes java a powerful aid in enhancing athletic endurance and performance, says physiologist and longtime coffee researcher Terry Graham, PhD, of the University of Guelph in Canada. So powerful, in fact, that until recently, caffeine in coffee or other forms was deemed a "controlled" substance by the Olympic Games Committee, meaning that it could be consumed only in small, designated amounts by competing athletes.

"What caffeine likely does is stimulate the brain and nervous system to do things differently," he tells WebMD. "That may include signaling you to ignore fatigue or recruit extra units of muscle for intense athletic performance. Caffeine may even have a direct effect on muscles themselves, causing them to produce a stronger contraction. But what's amazing about it is that unlike some performance-enhancing manipulation some athletes do that are specific for strength or sprinting or endurance, studies show that caffeine positively enhances all of these things."

In other words, consume enough caffeine -- whether it's from coffee or another source -- and you will likely run faster, last longer and be stronger. What's enough? As little as one cup can offer some benefit, but the real impact comes from at least two mugs, says Graham. By comparison, it'd take at least eight glasses of cola to get the same effect, which isn't exactly conducive for running a marathon.

But the harder you exercise, the more benefit you may get from coffee. "Unfortunately, where you see the enhancing effects from caffeine is in hard-working athletes, who are able to work longer and somewhat harder," says Graham, who has studied the effects of caffeine and coffee for nearly two decades. "If you a recreational athlete who is working out to reduce weight or just feel better, you're not pushing yourself hard enough to get an athletic benefit from coffee or other caffeinated products."

But you can get other benefits from coffee that have nothing to do with caffeine. "Coffee is loaded with antioxidants, including a group of compounds called quinines that when administered to lab rats, increases their insulin sensitivity" he tells WebMD. This increased sensitivity improves the body's response to insulin.

That may explain why in that new Harvard study, those drinking decaf coffee but not tea beverages also showed a reduced diabetes risk, though it was half as much as those drinking caffeinated coffee.

"We don't know exactly why coffee is beneficial for diabetes," lead researcher Frank Hu, MD, tells WebMD. "It is possible that both caffeine and other compounds play important roles. Coffee has large amounts of antioxidants such as chlorogenic acid and tocopherols, and minerals such as magnesium. All these components have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism."

Meanwhile, Italian researchers credit another compound called trigonelline, which gives coffee its aroma and bitter taste, for having both antibacterial and anti-adhesive properties to help prevent dental cavities from forming. There are other theories for other conditions.

Children and Coffee

How does this brew affect growing minds and bodies? Very nicely, it seems, says DePaulis. Coffee, as you probably know, makes you more alert, which can boost concentration. But claims that it improves a child's academic performance can be exaggerated. Coffee-drinking kids may do better on school tests because they're more awake, but most task-to-task lab studies suggest that coffee doesn't really improve mental performance, says DePaulis.

But it helps kids' minds in another way. "There recently was a study from Brazil finding that children who drink coffee with milk each day are less likely to have depression than other children," he tells WebMD. "In fact, no studies show that coffee in reasonable amounts is in any way harmful to children."

On the flip side, it's clear that coffee isn't for everyone. Its legendary jolt in excess doses -- that is, more than whatever your individual body can tolerate -- can increase nervousness, hand trembling, and cause rapid heartbeat. Coffee may also raise cholesterol levels in some people and may contribute to artery clogging. But most recent large studies show no significant adverse affects on most healthy people, although pregnant women, heart patients, and those at risk for osteoporosis may still be advised to limit or avoid coffee.

The bottom line: "People who already drink a lot of coffee don't have to feel 'guilty' as long as coffee does not affect their daily life," says Hu. "They may actually benefit from coffee habits in the long run."



Medically updated March 4, 2005.

SOURCES: Tomas DePaulis, PhD, research scientist, Vanderbilt University's Institute for Coffee Studies; research assistant professor of psychiatry, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville. Terry Graham, PhD, University of Guelph, Canada. Frank Hu, MD, PhD, associate professor of nutrition and epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. Hu, F. Annals of Internal Medicine, January 2004; vol 140; pp 1-8. Benedetti MD, Neurology, July 12, 2000; vol 55; pp 1350-1358. Ross, G. The Journal of the American Medical Association, May 24, 2000; vol 283; pp 2674-2679. Gazzani, G. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Feb. 27, 2000. Leitzmann, M. The Journal of the American Medical Association, June 9, 1999, vol 281; pp 2106-2122. Giovannucci, E. American Journal of Epidemiology, June 1, 1998; vol 147; pp 1043-1052. Pagano, R. Chest, August 1988; vol 94; pp 387-389.


SOURCE:- WebMD Inc.


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#15 Viviane

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 11:09 AM

Viviane,

I just thought, you may want to read this article that I posted a few weeks ago about coffee. Here's the scoop!

I hope it helps "calm" you about the effects or put it in the proper perspective as everyone is different.
and the best of luck with your Doctors appt and your tens unit! :hearts:



Lindsay its a very informative article
however since giving up smoking I cant drink coffee at all I feel nauseous with just a sip

I can tolerate weak tea and have two cups a day - I think stopping smoking has somehow left me unable to tolerate caffine

#16 Lindsay

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Posted 29 March 2006 - 03:07 AM

Oh dear, Viviane,

I ment for this articlle to be posted for the entire group to read...I gave up smoking as well, over a year ago.
It is amazing how your taste buds and your smell come back more stronger than you ever could imagine!
(At least it did for moi!)

Again, Take care and good luck with your Dr's visit. :hearts:

Be Well....

~Lindsay ღ , Forum Super Administrator
Founder, depressionforums.org


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DF member since June 2001 goldenvelope1jr.gif  

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"I cannot make my mark for all time...those concepts are mutually exclusive.
"Lasting effect" is a self -contradictory term.  Meaning does not exist in the future, nor do I.  
Nothing will have meaning, "ultimately."
Nothing will even mean tomorrow what it did today.  Meaning changes with the context.  
My meaningfulness is in the here and now. It is enough that I may be of value to someone today.
It is enough that I make a difference now."  ~Lindsay    
    

  
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#17 Jkm

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Posted 29 March 2006 - 07:50 AM

It's good to hear that you're having success with this. I wish someone would figure out whether this clenching is from the meds or from the anxiety. I have both the meds and the anxiety, and it creates a painful mess. I hurt down into my shoulders. I also have arthritis, and old whiplash, and an old neck injury. Physical therapy makes it worse. It gets the Fibro acting up. :shocked: I just put ice on it when it gets real painful. :shocked:

Send me a TENS unit, someone!! :hearts:

Love, Jackie :bump:
Posted Image

I have GAD. I worry about everything, lol!

#18 Viviane

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Posted 29 March 2006 - 10:40 AM

Jackie if you can find one cheap to try do so I have not felt so good in the last 6 weeks

I will see what my doc says about meds v anxiety - be interesting to see what her take is on this

but until then if you can borrow a tens machine to try out then do so - I have no idea if they are expensive where you are but my local pharmacy (lloyds chemist) had the portable model for just 10 I think that is about 17 dollars (US)

it is honestly the best thing I have spent some of my non smoking money on :)

#19 comebackkid

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Posted 29 March 2006 - 08:22 PM

Could you explain what happened to your kidney? My right kidney shrunk and my doc dais it's not due to longterm use of ibuprofen. It still works, but for how long? What about my left one!


My kidneys didn't shrink- they got inflamed, red, irritated. Lots of scar tissue, apparently. I'm guessing it's been going on for some years. The only symptom was fatigue - no bleeding, no pain. Almost kicked the bucket before I found out what was wrong. They decided it was ibuprofen by process of elimination - I don't have diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, weight problems, polycystic kidney syndrome, or cancer, and they looked normal on the ultrasound. A biopsy finally determined it. They said it's common w/ NSAID's (ibuprofen, aspirin, aleve) and it can hit one person in a family and nobody else. They have no idea why.

#20 Viviane

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Posted 30 March 2006 - 12:10 PM

It's good to hear that you're having success with this. I wish someone would figure out whether this clenching is from the meds or from the anxiety. I have both the meds and the anxiety, and it creates a painful mess. I hurt down into my shoulders. I also have arthritis, and old whiplash, and an old neck injury. Physical therapy makes it worse. It gets the Fibro acting up. :shocked: I just put ice on it when it gets real painful. :shocked:

Send me a TENS unit, someone!! :hearts:

Love, Jackie :bump:



Right accordig to my doctor this is NOT anxiety but is a side effect of the medication I have been given a new med (new for me not to the market) procyclidine hydrochloride that is supposed to help with this side effect-it is apparently a well recognised side effect in a very small number of cases and is one of the most likely side effect that means people want a drug change as it can and doese become unbearable - that is why I have the meds to try

I wont be trying the med till saturday as I have to drive and I dont want to find I have 'odd' effects and cant drive :)




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