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Hospital? How Do You Know ...


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#1 BrokenPieces

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 05:14 PM

I'm wondering a couple of things about hospitalization for depression.

First, how do you know if you need to head for the hospital? I mean, obviously if you're suicidal or going to hurt yourself or someone else. But does it warrant going to the hospital if you're just flat-out blackly depressed and can't seem to pull up? If you just can't deal with anything anymore, and you don't feel like driving across town to the psychologist?

And second ... what happens when you go to the hospital for depression?

Thanks!
I've had questions without answers
I've known sorrow, I have known pain
But there's one thing that I'll cling to,
You are faithful, Jesus, You're true.
When hope is lost, I'll call you Savior
When pain surrounds, I'll call you Healer,
When silence falls, You'll be the song within my heart.

-newsboys

#2 darcness

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 05:21 PM

(((Broken)))

I really wish I could answer this question for you, but I think this is best left up to the person who's in question. I think only you can make that final call on whether you should go or not. My wife has asked me the same thing when she's had her really bad days and I tell her it's up to her. I think if you're really struggling and things feel so overwhelming that you can't take it, then the option should be considered. I don't think that the hospital has to only be for those who pose an imminent threat of danger or self harm. Sometimes we just need some help and we don't have the strength to go on by ourselves anymore.

As for what happens at the hospital I don't know. I've never been myself. I'd imagine it all depends on where you go and how equipped they are to handle mental health emergencies. I'm sure some other members can share their experiences and knowledge on this.

Some of the greatest advice I've ever received on DF: "Always remember that recovery is not linear"
Such a simple phrase, but so easily forgotten...


#3 fishdamsel

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 06:13 PM

I'm wondering a couple of things about hospitalization for depression.

First, how do you know if you need to head for the hospital? I mean, obviously if you're suicidal or going to hurt yourself or someone else. But does it warrant going to the hospital if you're just flat-out blackly depressed and can't seem to pull up? If you just can't deal with anything anymore, and you don't feel like driving across town to the psychologist?

And second ... what happens when you go to the hospital for depression?

Thanks!



Hi "Broken",

What I would suggest is that you first tell your psychologist how bad it is and that you are wondering if you need to go to the hospital. He or she should be able to help look at this with you and assist you with the decision.

If you don't have a psychologist or don't feel particularly confident about that person if you do,
you can go straight to any emergency room of a hospital and have them evaluate you there.
There is a psychiatrist available at hospital ERs just for that purpose.
That person then can help you find out what the best course of action is for you.

Being suicidal or planning to hurt someone else isn't the only reason for hospitalization.

People go to the hospital often times to get medications in place, adjusted, or reassessed .
If a person isn't on meds, one advantage to a brief hospital stay is that you can be observed
24/7 for up to three days if you like and a treatment plan can be formulated that may be better
for you than what you are presently doing/receiving. Medication may or may not be recommended.

When you go to the hospital, you generally go to the ER unless your therapist has pre arranged
hospitalization for you. Usually, you would have a psychiatrist evaluate you anyway which just means
talking with the guy or woman at the hospital. So, all you would do is walk into an ER and tell the
person at the desk there that you would like to talk with someone about your depression and find out
whether psychiatric hospitalization is something that could be helpful to you or that you need.
Since you apparently aren't suicidal or planning to hurt someone, you would be considered a voluntary
admission meaning you are choosing to hospitalize yourself. Generally, then, this is for a period of one to three days
and I believe you need to agree to up to three.
If hospital is decided upon, you would be directed or taken to the psychiatric unit where a staff member would
meet you and get you settled in; i.e. show you your room, tell you about activities, mealtimes, etc. You might
speak to a social worker after that , but, if not right away, you would before too long.

Oh, you may want to take a change of clotheing and toothbrush and that sort of thing that would cover your
comfort for up to three days in case you are admitted.

If hospitalization isn't determined to be the right thing for you, the psychiatrist should help get an alternative
plan in place. Again, if you have a therapist; your therapist ought to be involved in all this unless you just
really don't feel that therapist has been right or helpful for you.

The unit will likely be a locked unit, but don't be scared about that., or if you are; ask about it.
It's pretty standard practice because some patients are there who may be a danger to themselves
and this protects them from going out and hurting themselves.

There will be several staff members there; nurses , psych attendants, social workers, psychologists, psychiatrist(s).

The unit will look like any other hospital unit with a nurse's station and rows of rooms and a central room and probably a huge television . :shocked:

If you are thinking about it, I believe that means a part of you knows that you need to be evaluated for it.
Trust in your gut feeling. :wwww:

#4 arturo_camilla

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 06:31 PM

This is an interesting question...sometimes I feel like this too. I would go, perhaps they can help you in a way that you hadn't foreseen.

#5 Lori123

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 07:04 PM

If you have a better relationship with your primary care doctor, you might talk to him/her as well -- get input on hospitalization and, maybe more importantly, get a recommendation on which one you should go to.

I went to the ER in December. I was completely suicidal. I called my therapist and told her what was going on with me, and she told me exactly what to do, and recommended a hospital. For some reason I can't quite remember, she told me to call them first and tell them what was going on. When I did, they said they couldn't see me, which I thought was completely weird, but for me -- that's just how things go. "No room at the ER for you." Anyway, I called my counselor and told her what had happened (she was shocked), and she then gave me a second recommendation.

I was at work, so my husband came and picked me up (per my counselor's instruction) and we just walked in together. The biggest thing I got out of it was my visit with the psychiatrist. I had seen three other psychiatrists in my life, and all three were bad experiences. But this guy was so good. Even my husband, who is completely anti-psychiatry, said this doctor turned out to be worth the wait. He asked me probing questions about what got me to that point, and then really, truly listened intently to my answers. He gave me insights that I had never gotten before from any shrink or therapist, and they were spot on.

The problem with psychiatrists is that it's often difficult to get an appointment, and when you're depressed, you need help ASAP. For that reason alone, it may make sense for you to go to an ER. Once you're there, even if they don't admit you, maybe they can 1) recommend someone for you to see, and 2) pull some strings to get you in quickly.
It doesn't sound like your psychologist is helping you, and it's time to try something new.

#6 BrokenPieces

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 07:12 PM

I will confess to a little fear about the stigma of having to be hospitalized. Plus, isn't it true that a lot of insurance companies won't take you if you've ever been hospitalized for psych reasons?

I am so on the fence about this. Right now I'm okay, but yesterday was horrible, and I was a little "bleak" a bit earlier today. I also don't want my son (16) to have to deal with knowing his mom needed to go to the psych ward at the hospital. I've managed to keep the worst of my depression from him so far ...

Geeez, I hate that I'm to the point of thinking about this!
I've had questions without answers
I've known sorrow, I have known pain
But there's one thing that I'll cling to,
You are faithful, Jesus, You're true.
When hope is lost, I'll call you Savior
When pain surrounds, I'll call you Healer,
When silence falls, You'll be the song within my heart.

-newsboys

#7 Guest_iowa_*

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 08:44 PM

Hi BrokenPieces, I can't say that being hospitalized won't make a difference with insurance. I belong to a fairly large group of peers and none of us has encountered that problem. If you are hospitalized, who will know besides your close family and whomever you chose to tell. The ward is completely confidential and will not even acknowledge that your a patient to anyone. As far as your son goes, you can tell him that you need to go for more appropriate treatment that they can give you.
Regardless of why you go in, in the ER, someone will come and evaluation your condition and decide if hospitalization is necessary. Fishdamsel has pretty well covered what would happen. My experiences have all been very positive. Here, they take away anything that might be used to harm yourself or another (such as shoe laces, belts, draw strings, etc.). Also, they will take any medications that you bring in and return them when you leave. We met daily as a group with a nurse to report on our progress and usually met with the psychiatrist daily. They no longer have any auxillary programs here, so the rest of your time is your own. You'll be expected to know when meal times are and most units close the "day" room at a certain time (for example 10 pm).
iowa




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