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Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome


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#1 illun

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 04:35 PM

I've been doing alot of research on thyroid problems and adrenal fatigue syndrome and finding that alot of mental health issues are just symptoms of people's physical bodies being out of wack. My other post about thyroid in this section of the forums talks about it in greater detail. This won't help everybody, but I think I have it and it is the cause for my depression. There is a pupil test you can do that might show that you have this illness and you can find it easily just by searching for it on the web. I think I have had this illness for 8 years and it is the real reason for my depression and anxiety. It's like I got depressed and nervous knowing that I didn't have that oomph needed to fully socialize with people at the speed and intensity that is needed, and this failure to do so really bums you out when you can't fit in. Starts to make you feel inadaqaute and inferior because you need to be able to socialize for your own well being. Slowly I slipped farther and farther down and removed myself socially alltogether to cope. I haven't felt like the old sharp witty me for such a long time that I just excepted it, when part of my body might have been unable to get going to 100% no matter what I did or how hard I pushed myself. I have done positive thought, meditation, prayer, hypnotism, exercise, you name it I tried it for feeling lethargic and exausted all the time. This disease has been being treated for over a hundred years, but has somehow lost "priority" for most doctors in the last few decades. I am not selling or pushing any secret agenda here, I have just found something that has given me more hope than anything else in a long time. It is a real physical disease, not just in your head(so is the thyroid one), and best of all they are completely treatable and people can fully recover. It just happens to be one of the most underdiagnosed diseases in the world but still very common in the general population. Here are some of the symptoms:

excessive fatigue and exhaustion
non-refreshing sleep (you get sufficient hours of sleep, but wake fatigued)
overwhelmed by or unable to cope with stressors
feeling rundown or overwhelmed
craving salty and sweet foods

you feel most energetic in the evening (I'VE BEEN TELLING MYSELF THAT THE REASON FOR THIS WAS THAT I WAS NERVOUS THAT THE DAY WOULD TURN OUT TO BE A DISASTER LIKE THEY HAVE FOR 8 YEARS, SO THAT MADE ME NERVOUS IN THE MORNING AND THEN SINCE I STOPPED TRYING TOO HARD TO "NOT BE NERVOUS" LATER IN THE EVENING I FELT BETTER WITH LESS ANXIETY)

a feeling of not being restored after a full night's sleep or having sleep disturbances
low stamina, slow to recover from exercise
slow to recover from injury, illness or stress
difficulty concentrating, brain fog
poor digestion
low immune function
food or environmental allergies
premenstrual syndrome or difficulties that develop during menopause
consistent low blood pressure
extreme sensitivity to cold

Edited by illun, 06 November 2009 - 04:39 PM.

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#2 Joanee

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Posted 07 November 2009 - 07:34 PM

I've been doing alot of research on thyroid problems and adrenal fatigue syndrome and finding that alot of mental health issues are just symptoms of people's physical bodies being out of wack. My other post about thyroid in this section of the forums talks about it in greater detail. This won't help everybody, but I think I have it and it is the cause for my depression. There is a pupil test you can do that might show that you have this illness and you can find it easily just by searching for it on the web. I think I have had this illness for 8 years and it is the real reason for my depression and anxiety. It's like I got depressed and nervous knowing that I didn't have that oomph needed to fully socialize with people at the speed and intensity that is needed, and this failure to do so really bums you out when you can't fit in. Starts to make you feel inadaqaute and inferior because you need to be able to socialize for your own well being. Slowly I slipped farther and farther down and removed myself socially alltogether to cope. I haven't felt like the old sharp witty me for such a long time that I just excepted it, when part of my body might have been unable to get going to 100% no matter what I did or how hard I pushed myself. I have done positive thought, meditation, prayer, hypnotism, exercise, you name it I tried it for feeling lethargic and exausted all the time. This disease has been being treated for over a hundred years, but has somehow lost "priority" for most doctors in the last few decades. I am not selling or pushing any secret agenda here, I have just found something that has given me more hope than anything else in a long time. It is a real physical disease, not just in your head(so is the thyroid one), and best of all they are completely treatable and people can fully recover. It just happens to be one of the most underdiagnosed diseases in the world but still very common in the general population. Here are some of the symptoms:

excessive fatigue and exhaustion
non-refreshing sleep (you get sufficient hours of sleep, but wake fatigued)
overwhelmed by or unable to cope with stressors
feeling rundown or overwhelmed
craving salty and sweet foods

you feel most energetic in the evening (I'VE BEEN TELLING MYSELF THAT THE REASON FOR THIS WAS THAT I WAS NERVOUS THAT THE DAY WOULD TURN OUT TO BE A DISASTER LIKE THEY HAVE FOR 8 YEARS, SO THAT MADE ME NERVOUS IN THE MORNING AND THEN SINCE I STOPPED TRYING TOO HARD TO "NOT BE NERVOUS" LATER IN THE EVENING I FELT BETTER WITH LESS ANXIETY)

a feeling of not being restored after a full night's sleep or having sleep disturbances
low stamina, slow to recover from exercise
slow to recover from injury, illness or stress
difficulty concentrating, brain fog
poor digestion
low immune function
food or environmental allergies
premenstrual syndrome or difficulties that develop during menopause
consistent low blood pressure
extreme sensitivity to cold



Hi

Well - you may have helped me also. I have almost all of the symptoms you mention here - and many others mentioned on a website.

I tried the blood pressure test and my SYS dropped from 137 to 114.

I have been on Nardil (an MAOI) for years and I don't think it's working anymore. I thought I was depressed and suffering from low energy because I can't sleep - but even when I do - most days it doesn't help.

I'm seeing a psychopharmacologist in december and I'm sure going to mention this -- and everything else I've tried that hasn't worked.

Keep me posted about what you're doing.

Joanee
~Joanee~ =^..^=
To know the road ahead, ask those coming back. ~Chinese Proverb

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Posted 20 November 2009 - 05:38 PM

you feel most energetic in the evening (I'VE BEEN TELLING MYSELF THAT THE REASON FOR THIS WAS THAT I WAS NERVOUS THAT THE DAY WOULD TURN OUT TO BE A DISASTER LIKE THEY HAVE FOR 8 YEARS, SO THAT MADE ME NERVOUS IN THE MORNING AND THEN SINCE I STOPPED TRYING TOO HARD TO "NOT BE NERVOUS" LATER IN THE EVENING I FELT BETTER WITH LESS ANXIETY)


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#4 illun

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Posted 20 November 2009 - 10:28 PM

Sorry Lindsay :-)

#5 illun

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 08:43 PM

Good news, I just got my lab/saliva test results back and I have adrenal fatigue! I've never been so happy to be sick, all those doctors that told me for the last eight years I had anxiety and depression can kiss my butt. Depression can be caused by being sick, having certain sydromes, or diseases.
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#6 Kittie

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 10:37 PM

What is the treatment for that type of disease? Some kind of hormonal replacement?

#7 ribosome77

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 11:39 PM

Good news, I just got my lab/saliva test results back and I have adrenal fatigue! I've never been so happy to be sick, all those doctors that told me for the last eight years I had anxiety and depression can kiss my butt. Depression can be caused by being sick, having certain sydromes, or diseases.


Hello. I was wondering what specific tests you had done. If you don't mind sharing. Also, like the previous poster asked, what was the treament?
Thanks.

#8 illun

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Posted 11 December 2009 - 12:10 PM

First off I need to make something clear about a comment in my first post. I make an insensitive remark when I say "in your head," I am in no way implying that people with anxiety/depression/or other mental health problems are just imagining their problems and that they are just not trying hard enough(I see now how ignorant that could come across thanks to a few mods who are looking out for all of us). I said "in your head" because of all the different programs and techniques out there that are try to get you to change how you think/percieve things to try and help people with anxiety and depression. Alot of these programs probably help alot of people, but I have many of and now look at it like my body was seriously trying to tell me something was wrong, while the programs were teaching me that my "percieved threat" was illogical and was actually the cause of my intense anxiety. When it was more like my thoughts were reacting properly to a very real threat, allthough not percievable in my suroundings there was still a threat to my safety going on inside of my body chemically. I'm not a doctor so I don't know if this is the case for everybody, but I think everybody should check it out.



Test for adrenal fatigue include: Saliva test done 4 times a day(saliva is more accurate than blood for this cortisol test) So basically your cortisol and dhea needs to be tested. If you search for Saliva Test's for Cortisol on the web or adrenal fatigue test you will find many laboratories that will send you a test kit at home without a prescription. This will save the cost of a doctor and you won't need to convince him what tests to do. Then if you have it, go to a doctor who says they treat it, and if you don't you don't need to go to the doctor at all. I was sceptical about my thyroid, and my doctor wanted to test my overall health and lots of other stuff so my labs were $750, but I wanted to go the extra mile here to try and rule out that if I have anxiety/depression it's not caused from something that can be easily fixed. I found an online cortisol and dhea test that was $170 and they have different packages with other things as well. They will explain them. Make sure it measures several times a day for the cortisol because your body has a natural progression that should look like this

cortisol level: edit: I tried to make a little graph here showing what a healthy person's cortisol would look like throughout the day with readings at 8 a.m., 1 p.m., 5 p.m., and then 10 p.m. but when posted it was a mess. The readings were 25 nM, 10nM, 8nM, and 6 nanoMeters of free cortisol at the respective times.

If you draw a line through the X's you get a healthy person's cortisol levels, waking up feeling refreshed with the most energy about an hour after they wake up, and slowly declining throughout the day. My levels were low and backwards, I had a reading of 5,5,6, and 8, which explains why I have more energy and feel better later in the day.


The treatment used for this is pretty standard and easy if you have a knowledgable doctor. If you have a minor case of adrenal fatigue, adrenal support supplements can be had at alot of health websites online without a prescription. Some are pretty potent though so be careful if you are going to try this on your own. Alot of people do, but you need to inform yourself, and probably shouldn't try it on your own if you're on ad's or other medication. Find a good doctor and be careful! In most cases though cortisol is prescribed in pillform to help the body get what it needs while letting your' reserves build up. Sometimes it takes months, sometimes it takes over a year, just depends on the person.

My doctor initially said he would give me around 10mg of cortisol(it's a steroid by the way) and was sceptical about going any higher, which makes me scared about his treatment plan. He said this was his specialty though and he his giving me other meds as well, like an adrenal supplement, t3(a thyroid hormone), and Pregnenolone(which helps the body produce cortisol). So I am worried because everything I have read says people treat it with just cortisol, but I'm going to try what he says, and if I need more and he doesn't want to give me more I will find a doctor who will. I am on websites allday reading articles from the best doctors for this in the country, and it is pretty standard practice to go with 20mg of cortisol and in extreme cases up to 40 mgs a day. When you take the pills you are supposed to mimic your adrenal glands normal production so you would be taking a dose every four hours that might look like 12.5mg, 7.5 mg, 5mg, and then 2.5 mgs. Most people in the medical field are scared silly of steroids, and they have good reason, but they take it too far. When steroids were first discovered in the 1920's or 30's they were deemed a miracle drug because of the amazing results people were seeing. Well the doctors went nuts and started prescribing large doses for lengthy amounts of time, to make a long story short, years later patients showed horrible side effects of steroid abuse that we still associate with steroids to this day, and the medical field deems cortisol as extremely dangerous and hate's to prescribe it for very long now.

A few doctors along the way experimented with prescribing cortisol for sometimes many years on a patient, but in much lower doses with absolutely no bad effects. Most doctors don't know this. There is a difference between a "pharmacological"(sp?) dose and a "physialogical" dose. One puts unatural amounts of cortisol in your body and the other normalizes the amount in your body. But you need cortisol to live. Currently most of the medical field only recognizes the most extreme form of low cortisol, which is addison's disease. I think that's were your' body produces no cortisol at all but don't quote me on that. I'm pretty sure you can die from it though.


In his book, "Safe Uses of Cortisol" Dr. William Jeffries says, ‘cortisol is a normal hormone, essential for life.’ (In fact it is the only hormone you die without!)

Steroids are not anything unnatural or alien to your body at all, just need to be taken carefully.

On the thyroid thread in this forum I talk about how prednisone made me feel normal physically but I had side effects that would be comparable to paranoid schizophrenia. I could have very easily been taken to the mental hospital around that time, I didn't want to share this because it's even embarassing over the internet, but when I took the prednisone I LITERALLY thought my parents and everybody in the world was trying to hurt me and were after me. I jumped out of a moving car which my dad was driving and ran off into the hills, I came back later so I was safe and didn't get hurt.

About a week after I stopped the pills, I ran out of juice and everything went back to depressed and lethargic. My extreme paranoia could have been a normal reaction to two different things(more, but just two I know of).

1.high levels of cortisol make you have heart palpitations, anxiety, discomfort, everyting that you associate with panic attacks. Remember a normal dose to treat adrenal fatigue is 20-40mg of Hydrocortisol(brand name cortef), well I was on 40 mg's of prednisone. I did some more research and found:
1mg of prednisone = 4mg of Cortef that means I was on a dose of prednisone equal to 160mg's of cortef where 40 mg's should be the max.

2.a thyroid dump. This is where your' thyroid works correctly so it has been pumping hormones into my blood for a long time with no cortisol in my body to activate it and send it throughout my body to use it. When I started the prednisone my body would then start up and make an extremely high amount of thyroid hormones activate all at once. According to Dr. Lam, (one of the leaders on the subject in the country) these unnatural reactions to steroids happen when your' adrenal fatigue is more severe, and within a couple months an "overall sense of optimism returns" and the panic attacks clear up completely. That's anxiety and depression fixed as soon as your body balances itself back out.

I wrote about my horrible experience on prednisone so people can see how "irrational" the mind and perception CAN be when there are hormones out of wack. I am going to start back on steroids knowing that I might get some of these same reactions, but they will hopefully go away after a while. I'm also going to start slow, and increase my dose overtime to avoid a thyroid dump. My mom who was diagnosed as bipolar 10 years ago, said I was manic on the prednisone. I now think that when she was manic right before she was committed, she was under alot of stress and could have just had high cortisol levels that people have when they enter phase 1 of adrenal fatigue. She wants to wait to get tested to see how the treatment effects me, but I'm going to make her get tested as soon as I can afford it.

I'm not a doctor, and I understand I don't have the background that they do, or maybe not the whole picture, and a little bit of information can be dangerous, but there is tons of information out there stating that alot of hormone problems are misdiagosed as mental health issues. The doctors stating this stuff aren't far off in backwoods villages either, their usually well respected in their field and across the country. Dr. William Jeffries, the guy experimenting with safe uses of steroids, has something like 3 doctorate degrees and 2 backelor's. Dr. Lam's full name is Michael Lam, MD, MPH, ABAAM. Here are some quote's taken from Jamie Bowthorp's thyroid webpage:

-Dr. Ridha Arem, in his book, “The Thyroid Solution: A Mind Body Program for Beating Depression and Regaining Your Emotional and Physical Health”, states:

Scientists now consider thyroid hormone one of the major “players” in brain chemistry disorders. And as with any brain chemical disorder, until treated correctly, thyroid hormone imbalance has serious effects on the patient’s emotions and behavior.

-Thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4, as the storage hormone) and triiodothyronine (T3, as the converted and direct active hormone) not only play a part in the health of your metabolic endocrine, nervous and immune system, they in turn have an important role in the health and optimal functioning of your brain, including your cognitive function, mood, ability to concentrate, memory, attention span, and emotions. On her website, Christiane Northrup, MD states that T3 “is actually a bona fide neurotransmitter that regulates the action of serotonin, norepinephrine, and GABA (gamma aminobutyric acid), an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is important for quelling anxiety.” She also states that “If you don’t have enough T3, or if its action is blocked, an entire cascade of neurotransmitter abnormalities may ensue and can lead to mood and energy changes, including depression.”

-Dr. Barry Durant-Peatfield, in his book Your Thyroid and How to Keep It Healthy, states

“Brain cells have more T3 receptors than any other tissues, which means that a proper uptake of thyroid hormone is essential for the brain cells to work properly.”





God Bless and Good Luck!!

Edited by illun, 11 December 2009 - 12:56 PM.

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#9 illun

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Posted 12 December 2009 - 03:33 PM

I submitted a website link to be added to the internet links on this website. It's at the top of any page on this site towards the right called "internet links." Look under "depressive health disorders" and go all the way to the bottom if you are interested. It's the website that I first stumbled upon when looking into this topic. Explore that site if you want to know more, as there is a wealth of information on it.

Edited by Lindsay, 09 January 2010 - 12:28 PM.


#10 illun

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Posted 28 December 2009 - 01:30 PM

Well I've been on the medication for about two weeks now and I am definately starting to get my energy back and some of my emotions. My joints don't pop all over in my body and the pain in my joints is going away as well. I think I need to be on more hydrocortisol because I can't feel emotions like I know I should be. My experience with the prednisone let me know what being on too much cortisol feels like, it made everything soooo intense and couldn't stop from feeling everything hit me to the very core of my soul, it was like I couldn't be apathetic or not care if I tried. I know what having too little cortisol feels like as I have been numb for years, so I just need to find the happy medium. When I start to feel better, I am goind to get a job and make sure all of my hormones are within their' normal ranges. It's like giving your body a tune up, as we are basically slowly throwing are balance out of wack from the days we are born.

Did you guys all know that you can have the chemicals in your brain tested? My doctor is a homeopath and I always knew that doctors are saying that depression is probably caused by a chemical imbalance in your brain, but never knew it was a simple urine test to get the results. I have high norepinephrine, and my taurine and dopamine is almost double what it should be which explains my anxiety. My serotonin is lower than the normal ranges which explains my depression. These tests are a great way to determine which Anti-depressants you should be on since some of them effect different chemicals in the brain and others don't.
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#11 Trace

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 05:17 AM

Hi Illun

I think it is fantastic that the meds are working. It is awesome when you find the real cause and treat it from the cause. It makes a huge difference.
You really have provided a lot of information and thanks for that, especially about the tests as well.
I hope that you grow from strength to strength everyday.

Trace
Listen in deep silence. Be very still and open your mind.... Sink deep into the peace that waits for you beyond the frantic, riotous thoughts and sights and sounds of this insane world. - A course of miracles.

True beauty must come, must be grown, from within.... - Ralph W Trine.



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#12 mdertinger

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Posted 01 February 2010 - 10:47 PM

Sorry if I'm a little skeptical, but I don't think you can measure dopamine and seratonin in urine. I've had depression for years and see an amazing psychiatrist. If there was a simple test to find out "which" neurotransmitter might be lacking in my brain, I think she would have mentioned it. I could be wrong....

Moderators, any feedback on the validity of this?

BTW, even with all the science out there, they still don't really know why some people feel better when the amount of free seretonin is more available in their brain (which is what a SSRI does).

In any case, your writings on adrenal fatigue were interesting. I experience almost all of the symptoms you mentioned. I just recently found out I have high TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) levels and low T4 levels. I'm being tested a second time, but now I'm kind of pi**ed that my primary care doctor didn't order any tests to determine why the TSH level is high. It could be auto-immune related and could be tested by checking for thyroid antibodies. He's also not checking my free T3 level, which I now read could be playing a factor in my depression. So I'll probably end up going to an Endocrinologist to get a real work up done. I've was checked about 7 years ago for all the auto-immune diseases when I was having joint pain, chills, and of course my chronic depression. I was borderline on some tests and I do have Raynaud's disease. I get major cold chills at different times of the day. I'm also a "night" person and can't really get going in the morning without my Vyvanse (dopamine) and 3 cups of coffee.

Are there any blood tests that could indicate adrenal fatigue? Not paying $170 for an at home saliva test if I have insurance.

It's exciting that there is so much research going on with the whole chemical side of depression, but I'm always left wondering, what came first? Did my repeated episodes of depression lower my resistance to these other symptoms and disorders I seem to have, or is my depression caused by some underlying auto-immune issue? No clear answers. I think I might also be seeing some pre-menepausal symptoms too. I wish they'd just figure this stuff out already!

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 04:39 PM

It's exciting that there is so much research going on with the whole chemical side of depression, but I'm always left wondering, what came first? Did my repeated episodes of depression lower my resistance to these other symptoms and disorders I seem to have, or is my depression caused by some underlying auto-immune issue? No clear answers. I think I might also be seeing some pre-menepausal symptoms too. I wish they'd just figure this stuff out already!



If they figured it all out, they'd sure lose out on a ton of sales, now wouldn't they? The people who make our medicine go broke if we don't need it anymore.

I'm just saying....

#14 illun

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 05:36 PM

I had the brain transmitter test done allready. Mine was from Neuroscience Inc.(I hope this doesn't violate terms of service, if it does excuse me please)

You can test your' cortisol levels in the blood, but it is inaccurate. I can't remember if it is because it test's what's allready bound to receptor's or what's floating in the blood. If you go to the website discussing thyroid information I posted in the internet links they tell you the reason why. This really is a huge scandal with doctors treating thyroid problems. They use the tsh test to diagnose, but all tsh does is send a message from your pituitary gland to your thyroid to make more t4. It doesn't tell whether or not your body is making t4, or turning the t4 into t3(which is HAS to), or whether or not your cells are making use of the t3. I don't want to explain all this here, you have to go to the website. Believe what they say there, every single person who has resolved this issue had anxiety and depression with it until they fixed their hormones. Many have diagnose's of fybro, chronic fatigue. and other major health problems.

Update on me:

Have been on hydrocortisone for adrenal fatigue for last two months. I feel better every day. There is a sense of calm I have now that has been absent for the eight years I thought I had anxiety and depression. It's weird now because I notice how badly my health has been. I am getting feeling back into my body, especially my limbs. I notice how bad my joint pain is now, I am pretty sure I could be diagnosed with fybro or very bad arthritis, and I'm only 26. The other folks who have been through this say that as the cortisol and thyroid hormones continue to go into my cells in my body that this pain should go away. I have been on t3 also for two weeks according to the protocal that valerie from the adrenal fatigue discussion group advises. I feel more energy than I have had in eight years. There is no doubt in my mind that this is the answer I have been looking for and that it will eventually get me all the way back to healthy even though it might take months or even a year or two for my body to completely heal. On another note, I wasn't feeling quite as much help as other's were saying they were getting on hydrocortisone. I mentioned this to the people on the forum and they said that my aldosterone could be the problem. I paid 30 bucks for the blood draw and found out three days later that on a range of normal adults of 4-32, my results were a 3.5. I need to be in the upper 25-30 percntile to be healthy. That's the crazy things about these ranges that the doctors use(first off every lab sets up their' own ranges, and they are different, sometimes by quite a bit), anyways the ranges tell you that don't have a disease. It doesn't mean that it's healthy. For example my free t3 was in range, but at the very bottom of the range. I had the free t3 of somebody who's health is not well and they would probably be very elderly. My testosteron is also low, 530 with a range of 400-900. I have the testosterone of a sixty year old man, I'm 26 so that's not exceptable. When I get my thyroid hormones up though it should have a positive impact on my sex hormones. If any one of these is low it causes depression.

I'm not the only one doing this, and if you look into you will see that there is enough doctors and people behind all of what I'm saying to validate it. Most doctors really aren't aware of it as much you would think that they should be, and that is why most "aware" thyroid patients are so angry at the entire medical community. I just think it is too telling that when you go onto the forums that I frequent, every single person who has these problems mentions having anxiety attacks and depression. I am not downplaying derpression here people, it cost me the first eight years of my adult life, but if you look in the medical websites where they explain the thousands of different conditions and disease that the human body can have, I bet more than fifty percent of them have depression lilsted as a symptoms. Being sick makes you depressed. It's my very humble opppinion that depression is almost always a effect of another underlyiing cause. The lady who's webiste I posted on the internet links, it's her oppinion that millions of people with thyroid disorders are currently on anti-depressants right now. She's one of the most informed people on the subject and also one of the biggest thyroid patient activists out there right now. If I MAYBE gave many of you a possible solution to a problem that has been destroying your' lives for a long time, would you even look into it? God bless.

#15 illun

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 11:38 PM

Sorry if I'm a little skeptical, but I don't think you can measure dopamine and seratonin in urine. I've had depression for years and see an amazing psychiatrist. If there was a simple test to find out "which" neurotransmitter might be lacking in my brain, I think she would have mentioned it. I could be wrong....



The place my doctor had do my test was in fact neuroscience inc. and you can look them up on the web. They do alot more nuerotransmitters than I had done. I had my norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, taurine, gaba, creatinine, and pea done.

I was in range in all except my norepinephrine, dopamine, and taurine were high. My serotonin was low. I'm actually not very concerned with these as much as I am the other hormones at the moment, just because when I had a thyroid dump I felt like I could indeed handle any challenge again, and I was still pretty messed up at the moment, I just had some hormones working that I hadn't for a long time. Your doc might be great, but think of how huge the medical field is, it's constantly changing, every patient is different, there are an infenite amount of things that can be out of balance in a person'ts body, and if they don't keep up on the latest technologies/treatments or check for the right thing than you are left untreated. It's sad really that alot of people can't get the help they need when alot of this could be fixed.

Something that really bothers me about my past and this journey is that I diagnosed myself as having anxiety and depression. When I saw a doctor I told him these were my problems. If I would have went to a different type of doctor and said "I don't feel right," then maybe he might have brought up the possibility that I might have a vit. defiecency, hormonal imbalance, or that there was something physically making me not feel well. It's like we don't feel right and since we don't know what it is physically, we just say it is a mental thing, when we should probably be looking harder. Just fyi being deficient in any of the needed vitamins or minerals our body's need can make anybody sick, and if low enough cause disease's. My new obsession is going to be taking GREAT care of myself. I don't ever want to be sick again.

#16 barbiegirl

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 06:38 PM

I have adrenal exhaustion too, but I think it is really important to point out that you shouldn't be interpreting lab results yourself or designing your own treatment protocol if you are not qualified to. I had my test (actually a expanded HPA saliva/urine test) done through my naturopathic doctor (ND) and he designed a program to support my adrenals to start functioning properly again without stressing them more. Supplementing with synthetic cortisol is only masking the problem and potentially worsening it instead of helping. I strongly suggest finding an ND (naturopathic doctor with a 4 year university degree plus a 4 year naturopathic medical doctorate) as they have far more expertise with this condition than MDs do.

#17 illun

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Posted 20 October 2011 - 06:16 PM

Hi,

It's been a year and a half since I last posted on this website, or even came here. I am not all the way better but have come a long way. I have seen three different doctors for adrenal fatigue and thyroid disorder. I am low on cortisol(adrenal fatigue), thyroid, vit. D, seratonin, and a couple other brain chemicals. I am having a hard time finding a doctor who is capable of helping me. On the website that has all the information on getting help for this, they hammer home over and over again what a struggle this is to find a doctor who will even acknowledge adrenal fatigue, and then treat that along with the thyroid problems effectively. I have been to a very highly reccommended doctor in Salt Lake(which is 4 hours from me). He started treating my adrenal fatigue, but said my thyroid was fine. After months of getting very little results, I decided to go with a doctor that has probably the most informative website on the internet on adrenal fatigue. He did not advocate hormone replacement, but instead said that by using high dosage supplements the body would take what it needed and repair itself. After having even smaller results than the doctor before him, I decided to go all out the next time. Dr. Holtorf has been on cbs, abc, and plenty of other channels because of the amazing results he has had treating thyroid patients almost entirely by their' symptoms, and not going completely off of lab results, like most other doctors do. I booked a plane ticket to Torrence, California(I live in North Eastern Nevada) to go see him. While he is very highly regarded among the thyroid community, he does not see patients anymore instead he tries to train the doctors at his practice and they aren't anywhere near his level of expertise. After several months of not getting better and thinking about taking my own life of stopped seeing him as well. I am currently ordering my medication from over seas, and treating myself according to a protocal that is recommended on a website to support my adrenal glands and thyroid, until I can save up enough money to go see a doctor who can hopefully help me. I do not reccomend treating yourself, you should be informing yourself so that you know when a doctor is not going to be able to help you(90 percent of doctors will not be able to help you even a little bit), and trying to find a doctor who can help you with these problems.

I'm sure some of you are saying, "why go to all that trouble, you're not even getting any help?" I am light years better than when I first started this post. I have have begun to get my emotions back, alot of my body aches are going away, and I am a happier and more patient person. I have fun at work talking and interacting with people, instead of trying to avoid everyone all the time. I have more energy than I have had in 9 years. I am not so sensitive anymore and when people poke a joke at me, instead of getting defensive I rib them back or laugh.

I want to be very clear that I am not telling anybody how to treat yourself or that you definately have any of these problems. I would love for all of you to go to the sttm webiste or go to dr. lams website and read about some of these things and actually look into it. I was diagnosed with anxiety and depression 9 years ago, and my life has been a living hell. I found all of this accidently and I thank God everynight first thing when I start my prayers for helping me find out what was actually going on with me.

I do not want to offend anybody by this next statement as I do not think this about anybody here, your' sickness is not a within your' control and it wasn't in mine either. I was a real hard a$$ on myself for seven of those nine years. Everyday when I could not socialize with people or even be around them without getting so nervouse(I had very, very bad social anxiety), I would blame myself, ask myself why I was so weak, why I couldn't be strong or confident like those other people, I blamed myself completely. As soon as I found out that I was physically sick and had absolutely no control over it, I eased up on myself alot. This has helped me probably close to as much as the medicine. I truely hope this helps someone, just one person and I will feel like I tried.

Just read the junk on those websites.

GL..............Steven

Edited by Trace, 21 October 2011 - 05:36 AM.
Addressing Admin on boards


#18 1000milejourney

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Posted 21 October 2011 - 11:33 AM

It's exciting that there is so much research going on with the whole chemical side of depression, but I'm always left wondering, what came first? Did my repeated episodes of depression lower my resistance to these other symptoms and disorders I seem to have, or is my depression caused by some underlying auto-immune issue? No clear answers. I think I might also be seeing some pre-menepausal symptoms too. I wish they'd just figure this stuff out already!



If they figured it all out, they'd sure lose out on a ton of sales, now wouldn't they? The people who make our medicine go broke if we don't need it anymore.

I'm just saying....


Hmmmm you really might be onto something there, Sweetest1!
The Journey of a thousand miles begins with one step. ~ Lao-tzu (Thank you, MofP!!)

One of the worst decisions I ever made led to the best thing that ever happened to me. ~ 1000MJ

What you think about me is none of my business. ~ author unknown

Depression is like a prison where you are both the suffering prisoner and the cruel jailer. ~ Dorothy Rowe

Why do you stay in prison when the door is wide open? ~ Jalal ad-Din Rumi

I love sleep. My life has a tendency to fall apart when I'm awake, you know. ~ Ernest Hemingway

#19 illun

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 04:03 PM

I wanted to mention that there is a great website in the links section, under "deprssive health disorders." There is also an "O.K." article on yahoo this morning on the fact that standard treatment might not be working as well as they thought in helping people with thyroid problems. Tells a story of a lady who was tested for thyroid disorder, and the test didn't work to find it, so the doctor put her on anti-drpressants.

#20 illun

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 04:39 PM

First off I want to say please do not disregard my post because it is kind of scatter brained. I know I do not write as well as I should, and know it does not help my point when cannot deliver information intelligent and well worded. I am still sick, and get quite excited thinking about helping people who desperately need it. I also can come off as pretencious, and or arrogent, this is not my intention, and I apalogize. O.K............back to a good point.

The easiest way to test your' metabolic health(thyroid), is to take your' temperature. The bodies normal temperature is 98.6, if your' thyroid does not work properly it will be lower. If your' adrenal glands(cortisol) production is not healthy, your' temp. will fluctuate throughout the day. I believe by more than 1 degree fahrenheit, but not sure. If it fluctuates by just .1 or .2 degrees I think that's not enough to indicate it. So taking your' temp. thoughout the day and documenting it is a great way to find out your' metabolic health. Make sure you don't drink any liquid, smoke, or do any physical activity before taking your' temp, as it can alter the temp. reading. More info. on this can be found on Dr. Lowe's website. Google it.




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