• Announcements

    • Lindsay

      National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2016   05/01/2016

      Proclamation 9433 of April 28, 2016 National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2016 A Proclamation Nearly 44 million American adults, and millions of children, experience mental health conditions each year, including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and post-traumatic stress. Although we have made progress expanding mental health coverage and elevating the conversation about mental health, too many people still do not get the help they need. Our Nation is founded on the belief that we must look out for one another—and whether it affects our family members, friends, co-workers, or those unknown to us—we do a service for each other when we reach out and help those struggling with mental health issues. This month, we renew our commitment to ridding our society of the stigma associated with mental illness, encourage those living with mental health conditions to get the help they need, and reaffirm our pledge to ensure those who need help have access to the support, acceptance, and resources they deserve. In the last 7 years, our country has made extraordinary progress in expanding mental health coverage for more people across America. The Affordable Care Act prohibits insurance companies from discriminating against people based on pre-existing conditions, requires coverage of mental health and substance use disorder services in individual and small group markets, and expands mental health and substance use disorder parity policies, which are estimated to help more than 60 million Americans. Nearly 15 million more Americans have gained Medicaid coverage since October 2013, significantly improving access to mental health care. And because of more than $100 million in funding from the Affordable Care Act, community health centers have expanded behavioral health services for nearly 900,000 people nationwide over the past 2 years. Still, far too few Americans experiencing mental illnesses do not receive the care and treatment they need. That is why my most recent Budget proposal includes a new half-billion dollar investment to improve access to mental health care, engage individuals with serious mental illness in care, and help ensure behavioral health care systems work for everyone. Our Nation has made strong advances in improving prevention, increasing early intervention, and expanding treatment of mental illnesses. Earlier this year, I established a Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Parity Task Force, which aims to ensure that coverage for mental health benefits is comparable to coverage for medical and surgical care, improve understanding of the requirements of the law, and expand compliance with it. Mental health should be treated as part of a person's overall health, and we must ensure individuals living with mental health conditions can get the treatment they need. My Administration also continues to invest in science and research through the BRAIN initiative to enhance our understanding of the complexities of the human brain and to make it easier to diagnose and treat mental health disorders early. One of our most profound obligations as a Nation is to support the men and women in uniform who return home and continue fighting battles against mental illness. Last year, I signed the Clay Hunt SAV Act, which fills critical gaps in serving veterans with post-traumatic stress and other illnesses, increases peer support and outreach, and recruits more talented individuals to work on mental health issues at the Department of Veterans Affairs. This law will make it easier for veterans to get the care they need when they need it. All Americans, including service members, can get immediate assistance by calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK or by calling 1-800-662-HELP. During National Mental Health Awareness Month, we recognize those Americans who live with mental illness and substance use disorders, and we pledge solidarity with their families who need our support as well. Let us strive to ensure people living with mental health conditions know that they are not alone, that hope exists, and that the possibility of healing and thriving is real. Together, we can help everyone get the support they need to recover as they continue along the journey to get well. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 2016 as National Mental Health Awareness Month. I call upon citizens, government agencies, organizations, health care providers, and research institutions to raise mental health awareness and continue helping Americans live longer, healthier lives. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-eighth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand sixteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fortieth.  
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
PaintItBlack

Anxiety Keeps Me From Having A Job..help!

5 posts in this topic

Posted

I have had extremely severe panic disorder for several years now. It has pretty much completly disabled me. I used to be very outgoing with alot of friends and now the only person I see is my fiance and my mother and father. I haven't had a job in over a year. I can't even get a job because my resume, I would only work for 6 months and then I would end up getting so sick that I couldn't work anymore, so I would quit. Now, I can't even think of applying for a job without having a panic attack. I am also agoraphobic, I basically live in my bedroom. The only other place I feel safe going to is the grocery store. I am only 21 and I am so sick of trying to survive instead of living.

I hide behind alcohol. I feel I am turning into an alcoholic, but now I have to stop drinking compltely as I am starting a MAOI called Ensam. I am praying with everything I have that it will bring me back to life. I can't support myself and I still live in my parents house. I feel like a complete loser and above all, a failure. Has anyone been able to succesfully hold down a job with extreme panic disorder? Has anyone had success with Ensam? I also take klonopin before bed everynight and that helps alot most of the time. This is the first time I have ever reached out to anyone, some encouraging words would be more than appreciated. :hearts:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You might also be interested in:

Posted

Hello PaintItBlack! :hearts: to the DF!

I'm so happy you reached out to us. You came to the right place! It is scary how much I can relate to you. You practically described my life. I have severe panic disorder as well, so I know how hard this is for you. You are not a loser, and definitely not a failure. The fact that you came here looking for help and ways out of this proves that! I apologize that I am not able to give you the answers you are looking for because I am still suffering as well. I just wanted you to know that you are not alone in suffering this way. We are here for you :hearts:

Also, please check out the Other Depression and Anxiety Medications forum, as you will find a lot of helpful information about the medications you are taking. Take care :flowers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Hi Paintitblack! Welcome to the forum :hearts:

My heart goes out to you for the suffering you're going through. I certainly hope that a change in medication helps you enough so that you'll be able to get out.

I understand about your job situation and your resume. It would really help if you could apply for a job where you can be completely honest about your panic attacks so that the resume wouldn't matter. Right now, work is difficult for many people. When the new medication starts kicking in, maybe you could at least start volunteering so that you could add that to your resume. Volunteer opportunies take many different forms. Personally, I've been considering playing board games with school-agers who are mentally challenged because the schedule isn't set and it would be less "threatening" than some other work.

Hang in there and keep us informed!! -Iowa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Panic seems to have been a factor in losing my job so I feel your pain on that. I can also tell you that the drinking will actually make things much worse. It does not really calm you down even though it seems like it can take the edge off. You're not a loser or failure but with these attacks limiting what you can do, thoughts like this are far too easy to slide into. I felt the same way and have days where those thoughts come back. They are just awful. Panic can make you a prisoner and hold your life hostage.

Keep in mind that there are many treatments that can solve this issue and while it will take time, you can beat it. This forum is really supportive so you are among people who understand where you're coming from. For now, take things one small step at a time. Don't worry about the job yet if you have a place to say. This is a blessing because now you can work at beating this disorder. Once you get to a point where you can manage them, begin the job hunt. Hopefully your family understands what a serious and debilitating illness this can be. If not, talk to them about it because their support will help you big time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I can relate to you buddy. Don't feel like you're alone as many of us suffer the same thing you have or worse! My case was very similar as I became overrun with anxiety.

I used to work for a corporate office where I was a computer technician. Things were great for years, I made money, work was laid back, and the whole 9 yards. Then eventually my bosses started to put more stress on me as people were being laid off. I developed very high blood pressure due to my stress and being a little overweight at the time. At the same time I started struggling with self-esteem issues, so I developed full blown agoraphobia. I see a shrink later on to find out I have post traumatic stress disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and major depressive disorder. My PTSD comes from my not so average childhood, the OCD comes from my mind constantly putting myself down like there's a little voice or demon in there saying it over and over, the SAD wreaks havok on me when I'm in places like church, school, mall and the GAD/Panic disorder I've had since I've was a child as I've panic'ed. All this also boiled down to depression in the end.

My anxiety became so severe I began feeling like I was going to pass out in places like church, public, and other places. I could feel my heart beating so hard thinking I was going to have a panic attack. I would tremble uncontrollably and very very noticeable to others around me. Even at ease, I would be eating dinner, and others would say that my hand is shaking while holding my fork. :hearts:

I tried Effexor which killed the depression flat out like nothing, but it made my anxiety worse, and I had extreme insomnia which made it impossible to hold a job along with the social anxiety. Eventually the doctor switched me to Lexapro and Buspar and just WoW. I could feel the difference almost the same day. I felt very relaxed, happy, more confident, so the doctor increased my dosages to stablize me. He switched me to Celexa (Citalopram) which is nearly the same thing as Lexapro due to the price. I'm now on 40mg of Celexa (Citalopram), and I'm on 30mg of Buspar (Buspirone). I now hold a sales job where I go door to door and talk to people all day.

I hope the medication works for you. Sometimes a medication that works for me might not work for you. Everyone reacts differently to medication, but don't give up. There is something out there that works for you. Some advice also would be to exercise. It really helps calm me down by burning all that adrenaline my body creates while I get nervous (because I still get nervous sometimes!) and it also contributes to your heart health which can lower your blood pressure and make you feel more relaxed.

God Bless

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0