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      National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2016   05/01/2016

      Proclamation 9433 of April 28, 2016 National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2016 A Proclamation Nearly 44 million American adults, and millions of children, experience mental health conditions each year, including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and post-traumatic stress. Although we have made progress expanding mental health coverage and elevating the conversation about mental health, too many people still do not get the help they need. Our Nation is founded on the belief that we must look out for one another—and whether it affects our family members, friends, co-workers, or those unknown to us—we do a service for each other when we reach out and help those struggling with mental health issues. This month, we renew our commitment to ridding our society of the stigma associated with mental illness, encourage those living with mental health conditions to get the help they need, and reaffirm our pledge to ensure those who need help have access to the support, acceptance, and resources they deserve. In the last 7 years, our country has made extraordinary progress in expanding mental health coverage for more people across America. The Affordable Care Act prohibits insurance companies from discriminating against people based on pre-existing conditions, requires coverage of mental health and substance use disorder services in individual and small group markets, and expands mental health and substance use disorder parity policies, which are estimated to help more than 60 million Americans. Nearly 15 million more Americans have gained Medicaid coverage since October 2013, significantly improving access to mental health care. And because of more than $100 million in funding from the Affordable Care Act, community health centers have expanded behavioral health services for nearly 900,000 people nationwide over the past 2 years. Still, far too few Americans experiencing mental illnesses do not receive the care and treatment they need. That is why my most recent Budget proposal includes a new half-billion dollar investment to improve access to mental health care, engage individuals with serious mental illness in care, and help ensure behavioral health care systems work for everyone. Our Nation has made strong advances in improving prevention, increasing early intervention, and expanding treatment of mental illnesses. Earlier this year, I established a Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Parity Task Force, which aims to ensure that coverage for mental health benefits is comparable to coverage for medical and surgical care, improve understanding of the requirements of the law, and expand compliance with it. Mental health should be treated as part of a person's overall health, and we must ensure individuals living with mental health conditions can get the treatment they need. My Administration also continues to invest in science and research through the BRAIN initiative to enhance our understanding of the complexities of the human brain and to make it easier to diagnose and treat mental health disorders early. One of our most profound obligations as a Nation is to support the men and women in uniform who return home and continue fighting battles against mental illness. Last year, I signed the Clay Hunt SAV Act, which fills critical gaps in serving veterans with post-traumatic stress and other illnesses, increases peer support and outreach, and recruits more talented individuals to work on mental health issues at the Department of Veterans Affairs. This law will make it easier for veterans to get the care they need when they need it. All Americans, including service members, can get immediate assistance by calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK or by calling 1-800-662-HELP. During National Mental Health Awareness Month, we recognize those Americans who live with mental illness and substance use disorders, and we pledge solidarity with their families who need our support as well. Let us strive to ensure people living with mental health conditions know that they are not alone, that hope exists, and that the possibility of healing and thriving is real. Together, we can help everyone get the support they need to recover as they continue along the journey to get well. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 2016 as National Mental Health Awareness Month. I call upon citizens, government agencies, organizations, health care providers, and research institutions to raise mental health awareness and continue helping Americans live longer, healthier lives. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-eighth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand sixteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fortieth.  
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Guest Gareth

What About Darkness Makes Me Feel So Comfortable?

9 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Hello Everyone,

This is my first post in the Bipolar area. (Actually, I refer to it as Manic-Depressive Illness. It's the former term but I think it's more descriptive.) I was over in the Depression area since joining. I didn't know they had a forum for us folks.

Well, to my question. I love night. I feel so much more comfortable. It's dark. I have candles burning and I feel at peace. That is probably why I love winter: the days are shorter.

They say (I always wondered who "they" are but let that pass) that the darkness contributes to depression. Well, "they" I got news for you, it makes me feel great.

Do any of you folks share this view or am I the only odd-ball around here? :hearts:

Cymru am byth!

Gareth

Edited by Gareth

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Posted

I don't suffer from BP just depression, but I to love the dark. I think it is because it is quiet and more peacefull. Right now I hear the church bells going (the only pretty noise right now), my neighbour is banging around outside, the people in the house are going about their daily routines, I just heard a small plane, I can hear people talking, cars going by on the street, the phone never stops ringing...ect

It is just so busy during the day and it is like an overload on my senses. The night is much more quiet. On nice nights you can sit outside and stare up at the stars and loose yourself in their beauty. The dark seems to stop all the badness of the world, and offers a silenance to let your mind calm it's self.

I think my favourite time is just when the sun is going down and you can hear the birds singing themselves to sleep...it signifies that the calm is on the way for me.

So if this means we are strange so be it.

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Posted

I've always enjoyed night time. Even when I wasn't suffering from my MI I still did. It's just always been a peaceful, calm time for me. I guess it's when I got my alone time. I normally would just sit in the dark on my PC and browse my forums and such. It just gave me time to unwind and be by myself. My fiance, now wife, understood that I needed that time to myself. So no, you're not different in any way. It's perfectly normal for people to enjoy certain times of day.

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Posted

I like the peacefulness of nighttime. On warmer nights, I have a bonfire and look for shooting stars. I live out in the country with a busy road out front. The traffic dies down at night and I enjoy the silence.

However, I'm a day person and spend most of my time outdoors. I'm up early enough to watch the sunrise and the moonset.

Sheepwoman

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Posted

I have a mixed feeling about the night time. I have problems with racing thoughts and a normal day can easily overwhelm me. I feel a lot more calm during nights when nothing is going on.

On the other hand I

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Posted

I'll take an overcast day over a bright sunny day any day. I feel more comfortable for some reason. Maybe a little more hiden rather than out in the light?

As far as darkness, I like it before sunrise best. But yea, I prefer dark.

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Posted

Oh, I know exactly what you feel!

Lol, if it seems a little odd, then forgive me, I just felt like posting this little poem that I wrote years ago, it really describes how I felt about it, and still do in a way (although now it`s a little less depressive, lol) :

"Why I love the night!"

Thundering so wildly like a raging bull

Sneaking and crawling inside my skull

Feeling the tiredness crawling through

Holes in the skin, bleeding blue

How the pain stretches beneath the deep

A demon inside which lulls me to sleep

I cannot sleep through this blessed night

Sweet lies of darkness, they feel so right

Tomorrow again when the light returns

With no shadow to hide in, my soul will burn

Revealed will be the paths of day

Problems to solve and puzzles to play

It will take all the silence inside my mind

The peace that it took me the night to find

My failures so clear in the touch of light

Falls to my knees in this endless fight

But like the phoenix, you could say

The beetle will come for the dying day

As the Ashes gives birth to the darkest lies

The night awakens, and I open my eyes

My lies will soothe this beating heart

Where the demon makes the bleeding art

For I find in my darkest web of lies

My life, my reason, the peace inside

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Posted (edited)

:shocked: Not sure if i'm on the same wavelength but I feel different in the dark because

I can sort of stop thinking and hide in the blanket of darkness (sometimes it feels just as bad as the daytime because I realise I'm just kidding myself)- not healthy I know but it's what happens - certainly doesn't solve anything -

I've been like this for months now but am starting to accept it can't go on -

I go into my own little world and pretend outside and the past don't exist - (burying my head in the sand)

It sometimes feels there's nothing wrong and i'm not depressed then the morning comes and i'm in a panic again.

I really want to get past this and start facing reality asap I just feel in limbo atm

I suppose I know what it is I want to go back instead of going forward

I want to move on but there seems like a massive backlog of mess stopping me

I've just started on new anti dep so hopefully they will help

Anybody else recognise this?

Edited by Elie

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Posted

:shocked: Not sure if i'm on the same wavelength but I feel different in the dark because

I can sort of stop thinking and hide in the blanket of darkness (sometimes it feels just as bad as the daytime because I realise I'm just kidding myself)- not healthy I know but it's what happens - certainly doesn't solve anything -

I've been like this for months now but am starting to accept it can't go on -

I go into my own little world and pretend outside and the past don't exist - (burying my head in the sand)

It sometimes feels there's nothing wrong and i'm not depressed then the morning comes and i'm in a panic again.

I really want to get past this and start facing reality asap I just feel in limbo atm

I suppose I know what it is I want to go back instead of going forward

I want to move on but there seems like a massive backlog of mess stopping me

I've just started on new anti dep so hopefully they will help

Anybody else recognise this?

just to say re my previous post i'm not bi-polar - but i am posting re: the darkness question

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